Do I Fill Each Layer, Let Them Rest, Then Stack?

Decorating By Hollandy Updated 28 Jul 2010 , 1:33pm by threetiercake

Hollandy Posted 28 Jul 2010 , 11:46am
post #1 of 11

still trying to make sure I am doing all the steps in the right order! I have two tiers. Do I fill, stack and then crumb coat? Do I need to let them rest after stacking but before applying the fondant? Or do I fondant them first before stacking?

After I apply the fondant to they need to rest again? (and why are they so exhausted when I'm the one doing all the work? icon_rolleyes.gif)

When exactly do I insert the dowel support system, after the fondant goes on, correct? so that would mean I would have to fill, crumb coat and fondant the bottom tier, then insert the dowel supports, then stack, right? So then it would make the most sense to fondant both tiers before stacking? (yes that's a statament followed by a question mark).

I am making this harder than it should be I am sure.

10 replies
cutthecake Posted 28 Jul 2010 , 11:52am
post #2 of 11

" (and why are they so exhausted when I'm the one doing all the work? ) "

I've often wondered the same thing. Thanks for my morning chuckle.

Yes, the poor things need to rest after they're stacked and before the fondant is applied. And then apply fondant (after their nap) before the support system is put into place, then stack.

Hollandy Posted 28 Jul 2010 , 12:12pm
post #3 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by cutthecake

" (and why are they so exhausted when I'm the one doing all the work? ) "

I've often wondered the same thing. Thanks for my morning chuckle.

Yes, the poor things need to rest after they're stacked and before the fondant is applied. And then apply fondant (after their nap) before the support system is put into place, then stack.




so when you say "after they're stacked and before the fondant is applied" you mean after the layers are filled and stacked, right? So, at nap time, I will still have two seperate cakes, right (the bottom tier and the top tier)?

Tiffany29 Posted 28 Jul 2010 , 12:33pm
post #4 of 11

Yes that is what she meant.

Hollandy Posted 28 Jul 2010 , 12:36pm
post #5 of 11

great! Thanks!

03FLSTF Posted 28 Jul 2010 , 1:00pm
post #6 of 11

Hi Hollandy,

Steps are usually performed in the following order when stacking a cake with wooden dowels or similar plastic support system (e.g. bubble tea straws):

1) Tort and fill each individual cake (reminder: make a dam of stiff icing around the inside edge of each inner layer and smooth the filling inside the dam.) The bottom cake should be on a very sturdy base once you start stacking on additional cakes the entire cake will get quite heavy. Cakes which will be stacked on top of another cake should be on a cardboard cake circle the same size (e.g., a 5 inch cake should be on a 5 inch cake circle).

2) Crumb coat each individual cake and let them rest at least several hours. The reason why they need a rest is to let the cake settle before covering with fondant, otherwise it will settle under the weight of the fondant, creating unsightly bulges.

3) Smooth any bulges which may have occurred between the layers while settling. If you used a crusting butter cream to crumb coat it will be well crusted after resting for several hours. You can either apply another coat of icing, or mist the cake very lightly with water (spray bottle). The fondant needs something to adhere to.

4) Apply and smooth fondant in place.

5) Repeat step 3 & 4 until all of the cakes have been covered.

Once all of the cakes have been covered in fondant:

5) Insert support system into your bottom cake (e.g., wooden dowels, plastic supports, etc.), and be careful to insert them such that theyll be covered by the next tier (the Wilton website has some excellent photos with step by step instructions).

6) Spread a small amount of butter cream (1 tablespoon maximum, in a small circle) on the top center of your bottom tier. This is to help hold the next cake in place and should be small enough that its completely covered by the cake which is stacked on top.

7) Place and center the next cake gently on top of the bottom cake.

8 ) Repeat steps to stack remaining cakes.

9) Sharpen the tip of a wooden dowel.

10) Insert the dowel down the center of the cake, through all thicknesses of cake and cardboard. Trim the top of the dowel so it doesnt stick up above the cake.

Hope that helps icon_smile.gif

Hollandy Posted 28 Jul 2010 , 1:02pm
post #7 of 11

03FLSTF - you're a goddess! THANK YOU!

BosCakes Posted 28 Jul 2010 , 1:04pm
post #8 of 11

if the cakes need a nap after that, the decorater DEFINITELY deserves one, too : )

Here's a topic of debate...

Bake, cool, FREEZE?, torte, fill, stack layers, crumbcoat, rest & CHILL?, then apply fondant to chilled OR room temp cake?

I've heard so many people do these steps differently.

Does the process change when applying just a final coat of BC and no fondant?

Does the process change in the hot and humid weather?

cutthecake Posted 28 Jul 2010 , 1:13pm
post #9 of 11

Different people swear by different methods. The key is to find what works for you in your particular situation. I probably vary the procedure somewhat every time I make a cake. (Mostly because I can't remember what I did before.)

Hollandy Posted 28 Jul 2010 , 1:17pm
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by BosCakes

if the cakes need a nap after that, the decorater DEFINITELY deserves one, too : )

Here's a topic of debate...

Bake, cool, FREEZE?, torte, fill, stack layers, crumbcoat, rest & CHILL?, then apply fondant to chilled OR room temp cake?

I've heard so many people do these steps differently.

Does the process change when applying just a final coat of BC and no fondant?

Does the process change in the hot and humid weather?




are you just trying to freak me out here? Like I wasn't worried enough! icon_twisted.gif

threetiercake Posted 28 Jul 2010 , 1:33pm
post #11 of 11

Fom my own limited experience, I would recommend filling the cake(s) and leave them to settle before crumb coating with buttercream.I then would place the cakes in the fridge for 20-30 minutes to give the buttercream time to harden before placing fondant on top.
The 1st time I covered a buttercreamed cake with fondant I didn't do this and the buttercream started sliding underneath.
Also, don't apply the buttercream to thickly as this too will have an affect on your fondant.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%