Is It Possible To Stack Moist Chocolate Cake?

Decorating By jesh728 Updated 28 Jul 2010 , 2:55am by jesh728

jesh728 Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 12:59pm
post #1 of 17

Hi! I'm planning to make a 3 tier moist chocolate cake for my dad's birthday, but am not sure if it will be able to stand? I'm planning of decorating the cake with buttercream and ganache.. need suggestions pls... thank you!

16 replies
mamawrobin Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 1:20pm
post #2 of 17

What recipe are you using?

leily Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 1:24pm
post #3 of 17

when doing a tiered cake, the support structure is what holds the tiers up, not the cake itself. You can do a tierd "cake" with jello. It's all in your support structure.

momomom Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 5:16pm
post #4 of 17

that jello comment was enlightening

Chasey Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 5:28pm
post #5 of 17

I knew someone would be referencing jello before I even opened this thread!! icon_biggrin.gif

Cenell Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 5:34pm
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by leily

when doing a tiered cake, the support structure is what holds the tiers up, not the cake itself. You can do a tierd "cake" with jello. It's all in your support structure.




I know my question can sounds silly , but, how can you tier a cake with jello?

artscallion Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 5:41pm
post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cenell

Quote:
Originally Posted by leily

when doing a tiered cake, the support structure is what holds the tiers up, not the cake itself. You can do a tierd "cake" with jello. It's all in your support structure.



I know my question can sounds silly , but, how can you tier a cake with jello?




The dowels hold up the cardboard circle which holds up the dowels on it, which holds up the next cardboard circle, which hold up the next set of dowels. All weight is supported by this structure.

You can put a penny on the cardboard, or an apple or a cake or a jello mold...it doesn't matter because it's not supporting anything but itself. It's not supporting the apple or jello above it. The structure is.

Cenell Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 5:51pm
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion


The dowels hold up the cardboard circle which holds up the dowels on it, which holds up the next cardboard circle, which hold up the next set of dowels. All weight is supported by this structure.

You can put a penny on the cardboard, or an apple or a cake or a jello mold...it doesn't matter because it's not supporting anything but itself. It's not supporting the apple or jello above it. The structure is.




Thank you, thank you, thank you!!! thumbs_up.gif

sweet_honesty Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 6:08pm
post #10 of 17

I see people quoting that jello thing all the time but unless you have your dowels perfectly straight and perfectly flat and all at the same height and ensure that nothing at all shifts I can't see how dowels will work with jello...

It's the mass of stuff around the dowels that kinda keeps em standing up. If I wanted to stack jello I'd use SPS or cake stackers.

artscallion Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 6:28pm
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweet_honesty

I see people quoting that jello thing all the time but unless you have your dowels perfectly straight and perfectly flat and all at the same height and ensure that nothing at all shifts I can't see how dowels will work with jello...

It's the mass of stuff around the dowels that kinda keeps em standing up. If I wanted to stack jello I'd use SPS or cake stackers.




That's a good point. I don't think you could move it around. But I think you could stack it. Maybe more stably with bubble tea straws. But I think the jello example is intended to be more of an illustration that the cake is not supporting any weight, the structure is. Now whether it's stable enough to carry around is a different matter, as your post indicates.

sweet_honesty Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 6:36pm
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion

Quote:
Originally Posted by sweet_honesty

I see people quoting that jello thing all the time but unless you have your dowels perfectly straight and perfectly flat and all at the same height and ensure that nothing at all shifts I can't see how dowels will work with jello...

It's the mass of stuff around the dowels that kinda keeps em standing up. If I wanted to stack jello I'd use SPS or cake stackers.



That's a good point. I don't think you could move it around. But I think you could stack it. Maybe more stably with bubble tea straws. But I think the jello example is intended to be more of an illustration that the cake is not supporting any weight, the structure is. Now whether it's stable enough to carry around is a different matter, as your post indicates.


Point taken and I get that the whole jello thing is illustrative but I fear that for some people who are truly green to stacking cakes that the wrong impression is being given if you know what I mean...

Sometimes from the responses I kinda get the feeling that people are taking it a bit too literally...

Cenell Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 6:53pm
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweet_honesty

Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion

Quote:
Originally Posted by sweet_honesty

I see people quoting that jello thing all the time but unless you have your dowels perfectly straight and perfectly flat and all at the same height and ensure that nothing at all shifts I can't see how dowels will work with jello...

It's the mass of stuff around the dowels that kinda keeps em standing up. If I wanted to stack jello I'd use SPS or cake stackers.



That's a good point. I don't think you could move it around. But I think you could stack it. Maybe more stably with bubble tea straws. But I think the jello example is intended to be more of an illustration that the cake is not supporting any weight, the structure is. Now whether it's stable enough to carry around is a different matter, as your post indicates.

Point taken and I get that the whole jello thing is illustrative but I fear that for some people who are truly green to stacking cakes that the wrong impression is being given if you know what I mean...

Sometimes from the responses I kinda get the feeling that people are taking it a bit too literally...




Thanks ladies. Just in case I want to make sure that what you are talking about is what I think it is. "Yo hablo español". LOl icon_lol.gif

mamawrobin Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 7:21pm
post #14 of 17

Collette Peters is where I first heard the "jello" reference. She said something like 'honey you can stack jello with the right support system'.
I cannot remember exactly the way she worded it....so I do know that I'm not quoting her exact words...so if anyone does know exactly what she did say....please correct me.

Anyway...what leily and artscallion are saying is absolutely correct. The cake has nothing to do with the support. Some are under the impression that if you're stacking a cake that you have to use a "sturdy" cake. Fact is you can stack angel food cake if you wish.
thumbs_up.gif

sweettreat101 Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 7:37pm
post #15 of 17

Yes you can as long as you have the proper supports. This cake was what I call the soggy cake. LOL All the tiers are white and chocolate tres leches iced in Frostin Pride whipped frosting with fondant accents. This cake was a nightmare because I rented the pillars and plates for the fountain and they wobbled. The only thing I had to use was a tube of royal frosting. My mother kept yelling it's going to fall down. Why do people put the cake table next to the entrance? I figured if someone bumped the table it wasn't my problem. I let my friend know that this could happen and was on my way. http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1686079

jesh728 Posted 28 Jul 2010 , 2:43am
post #16 of 17

thank you everyone for your advice =)

jesh728 Posted 28 Jul 2010 , 2:55am
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion



The dowels hold up the cardboard circle which holds up the dowels on it, which holds up the next cardboard circle, which hold up the next set of dowels. All weight is supported by this structure.

You can put a penny on the cardboard, or an apple or a cake or a jello mold...it doesn't matter because it's not supporting anything but itself. It's not supporting the apple or jello above it. The structure is.




thank you thank you =)

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