What About This Idea?

Business By Cakechick123 Updated 28 Jul 2010 , 2:59pm by all4cake

Cakechick123 Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 7:39am
post #1 of 14

I have a wedding cake booked for 7 Aug, they paid the 50% deposit but has been dragging their feet paying the balance. When I spoke to the groom 2 weeks ago he asked for a few days because he was waiting for a payment from someone and then he would pay me. The few days has now turned into almost 2 weeks and their wedding is only a few days away.
My contract says that they will lose all their money and the cake will be cancelled, so Im covered there.

But, I was thinking this morning that maybe I should do them a cake that will cost whatever they paid me for the deposit. So instead of the 2 tier cake with all the decorations I will make them a single cake so that they will still have a cake at the wedding. It will not be what they ordered, but at least its something. its a small wedding to begin with, so a one tier should not look very out of place.

I will let them know about it 1st, and give them the opportunity to pay me before say Saturday (one week before the wedding) and inform them if I dont have full payment as per our contract I am substituting the cake for one to the value of payment received.


Do you think this will work???

13 replies
janeoxo Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 8:01am
post #2 of 14

At the end of the day they clearly know your T&C's and have had a copy of your contract, so as that says, no payment, no cake...end of!

pixiefuncakes Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 8:17am
post #3 of 14

I think they would appreciate having the option. Weddings get really expensive ...... and whilst they havn't treated you with much consideration, you may just save the situation with your compromise. Give them a call, then you will know one way or the other.

iamcakin Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 11:05am
post #4 of 14

I think it's a creative solution.

Yes, your contract "covers" you, but this seems to me to be a nice gesture on your part. thumbs_up.gif

Yum2010 Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 1:09pm
post #5 of 14

That is very, very sweet. If they are pressed for cash, they probably would really appreciate that!

LisaPeps Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 1:55pm
post #6 of 14

The compromise is a nice gesture. I would make sure they are aware how much you are saving their backsides! Point out the clause in your contract icon_razz.gif

LisaMarie86 Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 2:12pm
post #7 of 14

I think that this is an awesome solution and it will hopefully make them customers for a while. (As long as they can pay lol) It is tough paying for a wedding and I can understand how they might not have what they thought that they would.

Maluisa Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 2:24pm
post #8 of 14

I am just a hobby cake baker/decorator so I don't encounter these dilemmas. Here is my 2 cents anyways, in light of all the threads on this forum that have to do with contracts and bridezillas lately. Make sure you ammend the contract and get it approved in writing. Even though your contract covers you and technically you have no obligation to make them anything, these days a nice gesture can turn into a nightmare that never ends. I would have done the same thing though. Just my kind-hearted self not wanting to disappoint even though I have had many an opportunity to say "be nice and look at the "thanks" I get". Taught me many lessons along the way.

all4cake Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 2:32pm
post #9 of 14

I agree. That it's very nice for you to offer them an option. If money became tight, it may be difficult for them to trim areas of the event at this time. Your options will allow them to save face (if that happens to be an issue.) as well as keeping customers and maybe even gaining a few more.

I also agree with Maluisa, cover your ass.

CakeFaerieK Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 2:49pm
post #10 of 14

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Even though your contract covers you and technically you have no obligation to make them anything, these days a nice gesture can turn into a nightmare that never ends. Just my kind-hearted self not wanting to disappoint even though I have had many an opportunity to say "be nice and look at the "thanks" I get". Taught me many lessons along the way. "

I also make cakes for my hobby. I sell to friends and family and friends of friends..... I had a woman contact me to do an anniversary cake. She wanted metallic gold numbers covering the entire cake. I didn't have the metallic color at the time and told her so. I also referred her to an awesome guy that is a professional, has been in the business for over 20 years.
It got closer to the due date and I never heard from her. I repeatedly sent her emails. I also asked her to PLEASE let me know if she decided NOT to have have me make it!
Never a response.

This taught me something. Do NOT chase someone to get their business, it's not worth it!

I charge less than bakeries and put way TOO MUCH time in my creations that I never get paid for. I am a bit of a perfectionist, lol.
And even with all the time I spend, people still want a 'break'....
I just recently did a cake for a friend and he paid me $30. It took 2 cake mixes and a LOT of gumpaste.
It wasn't perfect but I think it was worth more. And I told him more...so I won't sell to him again. Period.

Sorry about all this rambling.
My actual point was: They may have decided not to use you for their cake and don't have the balls to face you and tell you. Whether that be email or over the phone or in person.

Just follow your conscience, I've never found my 'inner voice' to be wrong!
LL
LL

Writecakes Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 3:24pm
post #11 of 14

Nice butt icon_smile.gif

johnson6ofus Posted 28 Jul 2010 , 2:49pm
post #12 of 14

I would "enforce" the contract and "cancel" their order, and send documents to say that. They violated the contract, it is null and void.

Second, if you want to be "nice", you can "gift" them a cake. No contract, no obligation, no "warranty"... that's all. I agree, this is a nice gesture, but don't forget "no good deed goes unpunsihed". And it happens all the time. Wouldn't it be "fun" if you ended up in court with your half price cake that they didn't like, thought was dry, or was too peachy in color? icon_eek.gif It happpens.... A gift, however, carries no obligation or warranty. Very nice, on your part however... But please DO NOT CONTRACT the free cake!

Yum2010 Posted 28 Jul 2010 , 2:58pm
post #13 of 14

Good thinking johnson6ofus!

all4cake Posted 28 Jul 2010 , 2:59pm
post #14 of 14

Smart thinkin' there johnson6ofus!

She still held to the contract but can make a nice gesture without getting bit in the butt.

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