Cake Pricing...not What You Think...

Business By catlharper Updated 27 Jul 2010 , 8:57pm by catlharper

catlharper Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 11:49pm
post #1 of 13

I've been approached about making a Croquembouche wedding cake. Now I've made creme puffs before so I know what goes into that process but it's not terribly expensive for product or seriously labor intensive. But I need to know two things..how many creme puffs are considered a "serving" and how much would you charge per serving? My BC pricing begins at $3 and my fondant at $4 but I have no idea how to charge for this even tho I feel like I'm up to the task. Any thoughts?

Thanx!
Cat

12 replies
Doug Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 12:05am
post #2 of 13

mfmamsdfmas mbmambmm bmbamm fmmmmfm


ok, now that I'm done testing the number of creme puffs that I can stuff in my mouth at one time -- make that eat such that it seems I've had a piece of cake.

the answer for me is ---- the whole box of premade ones from Sams Club.....

ok....that's not the least bit realistic.

3 is skimpy

9 is pushing it

say anywhere from 4 to 7 depending upon size.

an online search found these, which are 6 to the serving:
http://www.zeer.com/Food-Products/Delizza-Belgian-Mini-Cream-Puffs/000091717

----

now if it is 6/serving...

just how big is this thing going to be!?????

----

costco sells 110 minis for $11.35, or just over 10cents each.

that would be about 61cents/serving.

so.. yep I could see doing $3/serving as your price.

mamawrobin Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 12:53am
post #3 of 13

Oh..I love those pre made ones from Sams Club...I can eat a whole box by myself in just a couple of days. icon_surprised.gif

step0nmi Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 12:54am
post #4 of 13

DOUG! icon_lol.gif you made me laugh and then think "YOU ROCK!: ')

PiccoloChellie Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 1:02am
post #5 of 13

cat, if I were approached with this request, I'd probably price it the same as my fondant cakes. That spun sugar on the outside can go awry....
http://cakewrecks.blogspot.com/2009/12/merci.html
...and I'd want to plan for the extra labor of likely touchup work.


Quote:
Originally Posted by mamawrobin

Oh..I love those pre made ones from Sams Club...I can eat a whole box by myself in just a couple of days. icon_surprised.gif




A couple of days? I can polish that off in an evening if it's PMS time. icon_twisted.gif

Doug Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 2:30am
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by PiccoloChellie

cat, if I were approached with this request, I'd probably price it the same as my fondant cakes. That spun sugar on the outside can go awry....
http://cakewrecks.blogspot.com/2009/12/merci.html




are we sure someone wasn't trying to create Miss Havisham's cake?


-----------------

ONE MORE THOUGHT

just how big will your cream puffs be???

if not the minis -- will they be big enough that ONE could count as a serving.
(that would be one big cream puff)

mccorda Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 5:04am
post #7 of 13

I made a double batch of choux paste and made puffs in various sizes and the croquembouche I made ended up being about 18 inches tall. The base was about 9-10 inches in diameter. There were about 180-200 puffs and it was "glued" together with white chocolate (High humidity day, didn't want to use spun sugar because it would weep). It was not the only dessert and it disappeared fast.

catlharper Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 6:10am
post #8 of 13

Thank you everyone! I don't have a headcount yet but I assumed I'd be making about 200 minis. But after talking to a friend of the bride tonight it may well be the grooms cake and I'll be doing the wedding cake as well so it may end up being about 100 minis and then a full size wedding cake to go with it. We'll see! I have to say I love the idea of chocolate on the outside rather than the spun sugar or caramel...what a nice twist! I may, indeed, suggest that as an option!

Thanx!

Cat

panipuri Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 10:50am
post #9 of 13

Also, the spun sugar has to be done just before delivery, or it will melt.
And it takes a bit of time to do. for 100 minis, you would have to reheat the sugar to cover all those and those sugar and temperratures are finicky. Add summer humidity - .....!
If you havent done the spun sugar before I would practise and see on a small model

catlharper Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 6:22pm
post #10 of 13

I have done spun sugar once and it is quite messy<G> but I didn't find it too hard to do (now clean up was a whole other subject). This would be in January so no heat to worry about. The time I did it I was able to put it right on the table and it held up fine till the party later that night. Do you think it would hold up for a 2 hour drive?

Thanx!

panipuri Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 8:01pm
post #11 of 13

I honestly dont know! An easier way I found was to cover the floor with newpapers/ so butcher paper and then place your platter with the rolls on that, it was easier to do from "on high"!
And then jsut roll the newspapers up and discard. For the sugar falling all over from the pan to the news papers - no help there!
Maybe make a small " cage " of sugar and leave it for 2 - 3 hours and you would know how long it would last?

tesso Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 8:43pm
post #12 of 13

the cakewreck one just about made me wet myself !! icon_lol.gif

catlharper Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 8:57pm
post #13 of 13

Turns out the spun sugar is a moot point...they don't want it. She said she is going to talk to her family about the chocolate idea but thought white chocolate would be awesome. They still haven't come to the decision on whether this is the grooms cake and there will be a full wedding cake as well but she will let me know.

Thanx everyone!

Cat

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