First Tiered Cake Help

Decorating By kirigami Updated 26 Jul 2010 , 7:10pm by carmijok

kirigami Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 3:36pm
post #1 of 9

I am making my first 2 tier cake, 8" and 6". icon_surprised.gif I ordered SPS on-line but it was on back order and now will not be delivered to me in Canada in time. icon_cry.gif
I am sure this can be done with out SPS but want all the advice I can get to make sure this cake doesn't fall apart in travel.
My plan is to put 4 bubble tea straws into the 8' round, put some buttercream on the fondant and stick the 6" round(on a cake board) on top. Will this hold? My girlfriend is picking it up, driving it home about 20 minutes and then taking it to her mother's party later in the day about another 20 minute drive.
It is for a friend who understands this is my first tiered cake but it is for her mom's 65th birthday and I do not want a cake disaster.
Thanks everybody.

8 replies
ddaigle Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 3:46pm
post #2 of 9

Your plan sounds good...Just take one more step and instert a travel rod down both cakes and slightly into your bottom board (sharpen the end). You need to use a thicker cake board to hold these cakes.

Suzisweet Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 3:48pm
post #3 of 9

The straws are a good start but what type of cake board/drum is the 8 on? Once you stack (which your 6 should have a cardboard or foamcore circle under it) Sharpen a dowel and hammer through the center of both cakes and into the bottom cakeboard (if it is composed of cardboard or foam core.) This holds the cakes together as well as keeping them stable on the cake board. If you are boxing it. Select the box the same size as the cake board, this way the board will hold it in place...you should be fine. I just traveled with a somewhat large tiered cake done exactly as stated (except that I had forgotten the straws...ooopps!)The destination was an hour ride and it arrived perfectly...it was also buttercream not fondant traveling in extreme heat.
You'll do fine!!
Best of Luck icon_biggrin.gif
Suzi

crystal18_corpus Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 3:51pm
post #4 of 9

yes it will work I would sharpen a dowl rod cut to length of the two tiers and jam it thru both so it will have one center colum support you will be fine icon_smile.gif

carmijok Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 3:53pm
post #5 of 9

If you want to be certain your cake will be more stable, I'd also run a dowel from the top tier through to the bottom tier--especially since it is your friend that will be delivering the cake. I use the white plastic dowels and get them at Michaels. I've never used bubble straws so I don't know how sturdy they are...that might work also. Are you boxing your cake? I always use a grippy pad (my term for that perforated rubbery stuff they sell as shelf liner) under the cake in the box and then another one in the car under the box so it won't slide. Remind her to put the cake on a flat surface in the car if at all possible. Good luck! thumbs_up.gif

kirigami Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 4:03pm
post #6 of 9

Thanks everybody. I will have both cakes on the silver foil covered cardboard cake circles they sell everywhere.
One more question though. How do I cover the hole in my fondant that will be caused by inserting a dowel through the top cake? The cake will just be painted using the brush embroidery technique.
Thanks

AnotherCreation Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 4:15pm
post #7 of 9

If you are talking about the thin cardboard circles then you will need to use more than one under the 8 inch. hth

Suzisweet Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 4:18pm
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by kirigami

Thanks everybody. I will have both cakes on the silver foil covered cardboard cake circles they sell everywhere.
One more question though. How do I cover the hole in my fondant that will be caused by inserting a dowel through the top cake? The cake will just be painted using the brush embroidery technique.
Thanks



You put icing, fondant or a decoration over it.
EASY!!
PS - You are using the (approx) 1/2" covered board on the bottom correct?
I forgot to add that I have an electric pencil sharpener that I use specifically for my cake dowels...sharpens them very quickly and makes then really sharp so they go through the cardboard or foam core fairly easily. I use an actual hammer to hammer it through.

carmijok Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 7:10pm
post #9 of 9

I actually slide my cake down the dowel. I pre-cut the hole in the top tier cake board AND the cake so when it pushes up it won't make a mess,(did that once). If you cut your dowel about a half inch shy of the top tier, then you won't have to cover anything up and the cake will still be secure. If you try this method, just make sure a dowel slides easily in the top tier pre-cut hole so you don't have to push down hard (did that too once...not pretty). I like doing it this way, but plenty of other people do the sharpened dowel thing. I'm just scared of that for some reason! At least you have some ideas now!

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%