Freaking Out About A Cake For This Weekend!

Decorating By Hollandy Updated 26 Jul 2010 , 1:57pm by Hollandy

Hollandy Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 8:36am
post #1 of 15

I am starting to really panick about making my daughters 2nd birthday cake this week. Now I'm not sure if I am supposed to refrigerate the cake or not after I decorate it. I am not 100% on my timeline. I don't know if filling with plain buttercream is good enough. I am super duper doubting all of my choices now! icon_sad.gif

I baked two - 9 inch square cinnamon swirl, vanilla buttercakes and they're in my freezer along with the two 6 inch rounds, same recipe but without the cinnamon, as not everybody likes it. They're already leveled.

I'm planning on taking them out of the freezer Friday to crumb coat and fill, but then I have to apply the fondant and stack so should I crumb coat and fill on Friday, put in the fridge and then fondant and stack on Saturday (party is Sunday?)? icon_surprised.gif

I will do all of the fondant characters and decorations (polka dots, stripes) for the cake on Friday and apply them on Saturday. Well at least that was my plan. I don't know now! icon_surprised.gif


I make buttercream without the shortening because I can't find it easily here so I think once I crumb coat and ice the cake they will need to be in the fridge, but I am also covering them with fondant, so then I don't think I am supposed to refridgerate! What do people do in those situations where filling needs to be in the fridge but fondant should stay out?

I planned on using cinnamon buttercream for the cinnamon layer and just plain BC for the top layer but now I think I want to fill the top layer but I'm not sure with what! Dutch people aren't "super sweet" lovers, so I'm thinking Jam but then I think it'll all sink/bleed into the cake. Maybe just plain old BC in the layers would be better?

I'm afraid my BC isn't going to turn out or that I won't be able to get it "fluffy" enough because I have a crappy mixer. I'm just freaking out about everything!

I've attached what I hope my cake will look like in the end (only two tiers though) and it's only my 3rd cake attempt. What was I thinking!
LL

14 replies
tinygoose Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 9:01am
post #2 of 15

I refrigerate my fondant cakes all the time. I use Satin Ice, and don't have any problems. I've also heard good things about Michele Fosters homemade fondant, but not sure what MMF will do.

I'd do the characters ASAP, they will need time to dry, or they may sag. If you have problems add some tylose if you have it, just need a little bit.

If it's not hot out or if as long as your cake is in fine temps...approx 75 or below, I wouldn't worry about the shortening, butter will be fine.

Personally I'd take the cake out Thursday morning, torte, fill, stack, cover and (chill or set) for 12 hours, or overnight. Crumb coat Thursday night, cover with fondant Thursday night or Friday morning. Decorate Friday ....leave in fridge, if you can...be done before Saturday. If your stacking system is good, it will be fine on Sat. ( I uses SPS-single plate system)

Jen80 Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 9:03am
post #3 of 15

You've planned well. Nothing to worry about thumbs_up.gif .

I would do exactly the same regarding the timeline. Except I'd probably start making the decorations as soon as possible, even now would be good.

Yes, once you crumb coat it put it in the fridge. I don't use shortening in my buttercream either.

A lot of people cover their cakes straight out of the fridge. This causes a problem for me, as the condensation of the warming cake wreaks havoc with my fondant. So, I let it come to room temperature first, then wipe off any condensation.

Once you cover in fondant you can leave it out, as the buttercream will not go off in this short time frame and the fondant helps keep the freshness in. Just store it in a cool dry place.

The jam filling in the top tier will be fine as jam is water based and will not leak through a good coating of buttercream as which is fat based. If you are planning on putting a thick layer of jam you'll need to pipe a wall of thick buttercream around the edge so the jam doesn't squash out. I find piping the wall, then refrigerating, then filling, then refrigerating again before putting the top of that layer on works good for me.

If you are making the plaque ahead of time, I would put it straight into an airtight container so it doesn't dry out and is still pliable when you go to put it on the cake.

I noticed that you haven't got any tiered cakes in your photos. Do you have a support system you can use in the bottom layer?

Good luck with your cake! I hope it all goes well icon_biggrin.gif

Jen80 Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 9:05am
post #4 of 15

Ahahaha! Well said tinygoose icon_biggrin.gif . Gee I type slow.

Hollandy Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 9:23am
post #5 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jen80

You've planned well. Nothing to worry about thumbs_up.gif .

I would do exactly the same regarding the timeline. Except I'd probably start making the decorations as soon as possible, even now would be good.

Yes, once you crumb coat it put it in the fridge. I don't use shortening in my buttercream either.

A lot of people cover their cakes straight out of the fridge. This causes a problem for me, as the condensation of the warming cake wreaks havoc with my fondant. So, I let it come to room temperature first, then wipe off any condensation.

Once you cover in fondant you can leave it out, as the buttercream will not go off in this short time frame and the fondant helps keep the freshness in. Just store it in a cool dry place.

The jam filling in the top tier will be fine as jam is water based and will not leak through a good coating of buttercream as which is fat based. If you are planning on putting a thick layer of jam you'll need to pipe a wall of thick buttercream around the edge so the jam doesn't squash out. I find piping the wall, then refrigerating, then filling, then refrigerating again before putting the top of that layer on works good for me.

I have Regal Ice fondant as it is the only one I could find in the bold primary colors (which is why i didn't try to make it on my own, I was afraid I couldn't get the colors bold enough.).

If you are making the plaque ahead of time, I would put it straight into an airtight container so it doesn't dry out and is still pliable when you go to put it on the cake.

I noticed that you haven't got any tiered cakes in your photos. Do you have a support system you can use in the bottom layer?

Good luck with your cake! I hope it all goes well icon_biggrin.gif




Well the reason I wasn't making the character faces ahead of time is because I wanted them to lay on the cake, so kind of rounded on the cake (if that makes sense), like the Sesame Street Sign with her name in it and I was afraid if they were made ahead of time when i tried to apply them to the cake they would crack and break. Is this not the case?

I've never made a tiered cake before, that's correct. I bought little straw sized wooden dowels and cardboardy-cake-plate-looking things (very technical, I know) and was told to insert 4 dowels into the center of the bottom tier, use two cake platey things (one with the waxy side down and one with the waxy side up, so they won't stick to the plate) and then put the top tier on. Does that sound right?

Hollandy Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 9:26am
post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinygoose

I refrigerate my fondant cakes all the time. I use , and don't have any problems. I've also heard good things about Michele Fosters homemade fondant, but not sure what MMF will do.

I'd do the characters ASAP, they will need time to dry, or they may sag. If you have problems add some tylose if you have it, just need a little bit.

If it's not hot out or if as long as your cake is in fine temps...approx 75 or below, I wouldn't worry about the shortening, butter will be fine.

Personally I'd take the cake out Thursday morning, torte, fill, stack, cover and (chill or set) for 12 hours, or overnight. Crumb coat Thursday night, cover with fondant Thursday night or Friday morning. Decorate Friday ....leave in fridge, if you can...be done before Saturday. If your stacking system is good, it will be fine on Sat. ( I uses SPS-single plate system)




thanks! It's not going to be hot, I don't think but the weatherman has known to be wrong once or twice!

Thanks for the additional help on my timeline! I work all day long so I will take the cakes out Wednesday evening, so then I can follow the rest of your timeline!

cr8zchpr Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 9:57am
post #7 of 15

Hey there,

As I understood the party is on Sunday... I would suggest you crumb and cover the cake on Friday, Stack and decorate on Saturday. I keep my fondant cakes in the fridge all the time as well there has never been any problems for me either. Here is a cake I made similar to yours and the pic is inside the fridge where it lived for a whole day.... Good luck and just be patient, but I would put in maybe six dowels on the bottom tier just to be sure, I never use the plate system I never learned how I guess, so I use straws or dowels even on my five tier cakes and I haven't had any problems yet, (knocking on wood right now)...

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1676089⊂=1676095

Texas_Rose Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 10:30am
post #8 of 15

If you want the characters to curve with the cake, then it would be best to cut them out and attach them to the cake on the same day. If you want them standing out from the cake, then make them as soon as possible.

Hollandy Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 10:50am
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by cr8zchpr

Hey there,

As I understood the party is on Sunday... I would suggest you crumb and cover the cake on Friday, Stack and decorate on Saturday. I keep my fondant cakes in the fridge all the time as well there has never been any problems for me either. Here is a cake I made similar to yours and the pic is inside the fridge where it lived for a whole day.... Good luck and just be patient, but I would put in maybe six dowels on the bottom tier just to be sure, I never use the plate system I never learned how I guess, so I use straws or dowels even on my five tier cakes and I haven't had any problems yet, (knocking on wood right now)...

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1676089⊂=1676095




I love your cake! How fitting that you made a Sesame Street one and that's what I want to do too. Thanks for your advice, I really appreciate it!

Hollandy Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 10:51am
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas_Rose

If you want the characters to curve with the cake, then it would be best to cut them out and attach them to the cake on the same day. If you want them standing out from the cake, then make them as soon as possible.




Thanks for that! I do want them to curve with the cake, not sticking out. I've done a practice run with making them a month or so ago and it went pretty okay so I think I will be okay making them on Friday or Saturday.

eeeekkkkk!

Jen80 Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 12:41pm
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hollandy

Well the reason I wasn't making the character faces ahead of time is because I wanted them to lay on the cake, so kind of rounded on the cake (if that makes sense), like the Sesame Street Sign with her name in it and I was afraid if they were made ahead of time when i tried to apply them to the cake they would crack and break. Is this not the case?




Yes it does make sense, and you're absolutely right icon_smile.gif . They will crack if they are already dry if you want to round them with the cake. That's why I suggested keeping the plaque in an airtight container so it didn't dry out. The ones in the picture seem to be flatter and not right up against the sides of the cake, which is the effect I thought you were going to do. I think it would look great either way, but more work for you to do on Saturday if you go with making them then.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hollandy

I've never made a tiered cake before, that's correct. I bought little straw sized wooden dowels and cardboardy-cake-plate-looking things (very technical, I know) and was told to insert 4 dowels into the center of the bottom tier, use two cake platey things (one with the waxy side down and one with the waxy side up, so they won't stick to the plate) and then put the top tier on. Does that sound right?




I'm not familiar with the waxed cake boards that you are talking about, but yes, that does sound right thumbs_up.gif . If you are travelling with the cake (which I'm guessing you aren't, but anyway), I'd put a central dowel down through the whole cake so the top tier doesn't slip off the bottom tier. It's just that those waxed cake boards sound slippery (like I said I'm not familiar with them).

Hollandy Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 12:47pm
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jen80

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hollandy

Well the reason I wasn't making the character faces ahead of time is because I wanted them to lay on the cake, so kind of rounded on the cake (if that makes sense), like the Sesame Street Sign with her name in it and I was afraid if they were made ahead of time when i tried to apply them to the cake they would crack and break. Is this not the case?



Yes it does make sense, and you're absolutely right icon_smile.gif . They will crack if they are already dry if you want to round them with the cake. That's why I suggested keeping the plaque in an airtight container so it didn't dry out. The ones in the picture seem to be flatter and not right up against the sides of the cake, which is the effect I thought you were going to do. I think it would look great either way, but more work for you to do on Saturday if you go with making them then.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hollandy

I've never made a tiered cake before, that's correct. I bought little straw sized wooden dowels and cardboardy-cake-plate-looking things (very technical, I know) and was told to insert 4 dowels into the center of the bottom tier, use two cake platey things (one with the waxy side down and one with the waxy side up, so they won't stick to the plate) and then put the top tier on. Does that sound right?



I'm not familiar with the waxed cake boards that you are talking about, but yes, that does sound right thumbs_up.gif . If you are travelling with the cake (which I'm guessing you aren't, but anyway), I'd put a central dowel down through the whole cake so the top tier doesn't slip off the bottom tier. It's just that those waxed cake boards sound slippery (like I said I'm not familiar with them).




well the cake store lady gave me the waxy cake board things (they are just really thinly cut out circles of cardboard but one side is slick, maybe not exactly wax, but the other side is plain cardboard. She said I would need to use them so the top tier doesn't stick to the bottom tier, but I think I want the top tier to stick to the bottom tier, don't I? I guess maybe it's a cake seperator? I have no clue, I was just going to use it on top the dowels because she said I should. LOL

Luckily I am not moving this cake far at all, just within my house!

Jen80 Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 12:58pm
post #13 of 15

Hehehe! Yes cake separators they are.

It's just added protection so your top cake doesn't sink into your bottom cake and for your icing to stay somewhat neat when you separate the cakes for slicing.

nana_marta Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 1:05pm
post #14 of 15

You are going to somehow "glue " those two cardboard cake boards together so they do not slide against each other right? I'm sure you were and just forgot to mention it in your list! icon_wink.gif

Hollandy Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 1:57pm
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by nana_marta

You are going to somehow "glue " those two cardboard cake boards together so they do not slide against each other right? I'm sure you were and just forgot to mention it in your list! icon_wink.gif



well I am now! thumbs_up.gif

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