Rolling Fondant Thin

Decorating By ylescu Updated 27 Jul 2010 , 1:03am by kimbordeaux

ylescu Posted 24 Jul 2010 , 8:07am
post #1 of 13

How can some bakers roll their fondant really thin? I use a regular scratch recipe for rolled fondant and whenever I try to roll it thin it either a) sticks like crazy to my table (even with the aid of cornstarch/ powdered sugar), or b) when I drape it over my cake, it'll end up tearing on me on the top edges of say, a round cake, like its too soft or something, it doesn't stay put and just tends to pull on it. Here's the recipe I use:

2 lbs powdered sugar
1 tbsp gelatin
1/4 cup water
1/2 cup glucose
1 tbsp glycerin
2 tbsp shortening

The only way I can cover my cake without much trouble is to roll it thick (about 1/2 an inch)

Any suggestions? Is it because their using pre-made fondant like SatinIce?

12 replies
kimbordeaux Posted 24 Jul 2010 , 6:42pm
post #2 of 13

I've never tried that recipe before. I've made MMF before. I used marshmallows, powdered sugar, water, vanilla. That one was fine, you have to find the right consistency that works best for you by changing the amounts of sugar and water. Now, I purchase Satin Ice. Never had any problems until the last bucket I bought but, I contacted Satin Ice and after I gave them the batch # they told me they had a recipe error with that batch and sent me a new one.

cathyscakes Posted 24 Jul 2010 , 6:54pm
post #3 of 13

I use Jennifer Dontz's recipe for fondant. She adds white chocolate candy clay to pettinice fondant, and you can roll that fondant really thin. Doesn't tear very easy, doesn't crack, or dry out, it has a long work time, I loved it.

kimbordeaux Posted 24 Jul 2010 , 7:07pm
post #4 of 13

I've been hearing raves for Jennifer Dontz's fondant recipe. Where do I find the recipe? I don't have too many problems with SI except that it has a short work time, will dry, crack and get elephant skin if you are not fast.

cathyscakes Posted 24 Jul 2010 , 7:54pm
post #5 of 13

Hi Kim, I got the recipe from her fondant video. If you go to her site, you can order it there. She has lots of other hints too. I don't think I should give out her recipe. She is such a sweet lady trying make a living, so I would rather you buy her video. You could contact her, but I don't feel like its my place to give it out. She is wonderful.

kimbordeaux Posted 24 Jul 2010 , 8:30pm
post #6 of 13

Thanks cathycakes. I couldn't find anything about her fondant recipe on here that's why I asked and so many talk about it. Didn't know about the site/video. Thanks!

ylescu Posted 25 Jul 2010 , 1:45am
post #7 of 13

I can't resort to using pre-made fondant like satin ice or pettinice because its too expensive where I live.

Any other ideas?

tiggy2 Posted 25 Jul 2010 , 1:50am
post #8 of 13

You have to buy her DVD to get the recipe but it's worth it.

dsilvest Posted 25 Jul 2010 , 2:03am
post #9 of 13

ylescu

I use a recipe very similar to this and love it. Try adding a bit of tylose to the batch to help with stretchiness.
I usually put some shortening on my hands and work it into the fondant before rolling it out. I only use a bit of PS on the counter and lift and reposition it every couple of rolls. If it is beginning to stick I put a bit more PS underneath. I try to keep the PS to a minimum.
If you are able to roll the fondant thinner it will not be as heavy and you should not have the tearing problem.

kimbordeaux Posted 25 Jul 2010 , 2:15am
post #10 of 13

ylescu,
Not sure what precentage of your cakes are covered or use fondant but it really is worth my money to buy my fondant. Just about all my cakes are covered in fondant. I buy mine from www.fondantsource.com. They have the cheapest Satin Ice I can find. I live in SC and they are located in FL. My last order was one 20lb white Satin Ice and one 5lb blue Satin Ice and my cost was $74.77. $45.99 for 20lb, $16.99 for 5lb and shipping was $18.09. It really is worth the cost if you use a lot of fondant. It frees up time, less clean up, easier application...

Tiggy2 thanks. I'm always open to trying something new because you never know... might be better than what you are using or doing now and I'm always looking for ways to make my life better icon_smile.gif

sols Posted 25 Jul 2010 , 2:44am
post #11 of 13

ylescu,

I use the same recipe that you do but without the glycerin and shortening. I usually make a batch before I actually have to use it. I let it sit in the fridge overnight and let it thaw just before I need to use it. I find that it works better this way, it's less sticky and doesn't tear as easily. I also add some type of flavouring when I make it so it tastes great too.

I add cornstarch to my work surface periodically when I roll it out and I'm able to get it really thin. Hope that helps

millicente Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 4:48pm
post #12 of 13

I just bought 2 20lb buckets of satin ice. I used it to make 2 cakes this weekend andI got hard & cracks very fast.......I looked at the bucket and it was made in april. was your bad batch then. Is it normal for satin ice to dry and crack within five minutes? i bought it because I got tired of making my own fondant and the results were always different.any help please

kimbordeaux Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 1:03am
post #13 of 13

millicente,
I don't remember my batch number, I've thrown bucket away. All I remember is that it was a bunch of numbers. I email Satin Ice and told them of my problems and that it wasn't my first bucket or attempt at covering a cake with fondant and they wrote me back wanting the batch number. Then they wrote me back telling that was a batch because they had some equipment and recipe problems. All I can suggest is go to their site and email them your problem, you never know icon_smile.gif

~KIM

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%