Cakes Sticking To Pans....ugh!!!!!!

Baking By smokeysmokerton Updated 24 Jul 2010 , 1:58am by Bakingangel

smokeysmokerton Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 2:31pm
post #1 of 29

I'm doing a cc tower for my son's bday tomorrow with a six inch cake on top. The first one I made and froze on wed, thawed yesterday. I had a really hard time getting it level and decided to make a new one. I made my baking strips with a towel thinking I wouldn't have to level it and baked at 325. It took forever to bake and when it was done, the sides weren't even brown but the top was really dark. It stuck so badly to the pan around the sides that it was completely unusable. I made two more after that with the same problem both times. Is it possible for the strips to be too wet?

The party is tomorrow, so I accepted defeat and ordered an 8" smooth buttercream cake from Kroger(gasp!) and had it airbrushed blue. It's a spongebob cake and I've already made the fondant accents....so at least it's partly mine. I'm so ashamed! icon_biggrin.gificon_cry.gificon_lol.gificon_redface.gif

28 replies
indydebi Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 2:44pm
post #2 of 29

No, the strips can't be too wet. I've used them for years.

The sides not being browned is not a bad thing. I actually WANT my cakes to come out that way. If the top seemed too brown, you might want to check your oven temp to make sure it's right and not hotter than you think it is.

How do you treat your pans? I stopped using Pam spray because the cakes stuck and when they did come out, the sides were "fried" (crispy!). I grease-only-no-flour and don't be afraid to slap that grease on the pan! I find a lot of folks just barely coat the pan. Put a good thick coat on there.

What kind/brand of pan is it?

KieslerKakes Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 2:47pm
post #3 of 29

I've been doing the wax paper trick. You line your pans with wax paper, no spraying or anything. Once they cook they pop right out. The cakes can be stored out in the open with the wax paper still attached and a piece of clear wrap over the top. The cakes are very moist and you don't have to wash after each baking. Remember to trim the excess wax paper from the edges or they will smell when the cake is cooking. I saw this on a cake video I have at home, can't remember the name. Also cakes don't need to be leveled so you lose all that extra left over cake trimmings.

indydebi Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 3:06pm
post #4 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by KieslerKakes

Also cakes don't need to be leveled so you lose all that extra left over cake trimmings.



How does the wax paper on the bottom prevent doming? icon_confused.gif

KieslerKakes Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 3:07pm
post #5 of 29

I don't know, but it works. Wax paper on the bottom and sides.

sweet_honesty Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 3:14pm
post #6 of 29

I use a either a combo of waxed paper in the bottom and homemade pan grease on the sides or fully lined with waxed and parchment depending on the type of cake I'm making and in my experience waxed paper does nothing for doming. I think that depends on your recipe and your baking methods.......

KieslerKakes Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 3:17pm
post #7 of 29

Without being at home looking at my DVD's, I think it was a Sugarcraft video that demonstarted this.

indydebi Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 3:18pm
post #8 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweet_honesty

.... and in my experience waxed paper does nothing for doming. I think that depends on your recipe and your baking methods.......



That's what I was thinking because the few scratch cakes I've made tend to dome less than the cake mix cakes I make, so I wondered if that was a factor.

smokeysmokerton Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 3:20pm
post #9 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

No, the strips can't be too wet. I've used them for years.

The sides not being browned is not a bad thing. I actually WANT my cakes to come out that way. If the top seemed too brown, you might want to check your oven temp to make sure it's right and not hotter than you think it is.

How do you treat your pans? I stopped using Pam spray because the cakes stuck and when they did come out, the sides were "fried" (crispy!). I grease-only-no-flour and don't be afraid to slap that grease on the pan! I find a lot of folks just barely coat the pan. Put a good thick coat on there.

What kind/brand of pan is it?





I think you might be on to something with oven temp. I thought it was strange that the top got so brown, but again, I thought maybe the strips were too wet and I was't getting enough heat to the sides.

I just grease the sides and put wax paper in the bottom. I do only use a thin coating though because I thought I'd get the crispy sides if I used too much. And it's the "Celebrate" pans from Michaels.

I have another tower for a birthday next saturday, so I'll try again then.

KieslerKakes, I assume you just cut the strip to size and line the inside?

Thanks so much, guys! I wish I'd asked yesterday when I had more time icon_smile.gif

KieslerKakes Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 3:29pm
post #10 of 29

I'll find out more information tonight when I get home and find out the video owner. I'll post more then. You cut the wax paper a little larger than your cake pan so one piece covers the bottom and the sides. Smooth it out so you don't have an wrinkles. Also I use box cake mixes, I just bake for family and friends so I don't invest in alot of extra tools. I try to use things I have at home.

mamawrobin Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 3:42pm
post #11 of 29

I use homeade pan grease. Equal amounts of oil, shortening and flour. I "paint" it on the bottom and sides of my pans using a pastry brush..and like Indydebi said...use plenty of it.

You can line your pans with wax paper but with the pan grease there is no need. And NO lining your pan with wax paper will not prevent doming. icon_confused.gif

PANGREASE:
1 cup shortening
1 cup oil
1 cup flour
use hand mixer and blend until thoroughly mixed. Store in airtight container. NO refrigeration required.

Mama_Mias_Cakes Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 3:49pm
post #12 of 29

I use the home made goop as well and not had a cake stick since that. I do the same thing as Mamarobin.

Cindy619 Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 3:54pm
post #13 of 29

I'm personally a fan of Wilton's Cake Release - never had a cake stick when using it! You just have to be generous with it. Although...homemade would be a lot cheaper! I think I might give the flour, shortening, and oil a try sometime.

CookieMeister Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 4:04pm
post #14 of 29

I may have to try the homemade grease. I use PAM for baking and it's EXPENSIVE. Thanks, mamawrobin!

mamawrobin Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 4:25pm
post #15 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieMeister

I may have to try the homemade grease. I use PAM for baking and it's EXPENSIVE. Thanks, mamawrobin!




You're welcome..but I'm just passing on something that I've learned from some other cc members. thumbs_up.gif

sweet_honesty Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 4:27pm
post #16 of 29

I am a recent convert to homemade pan grease and I cannot stop singing its praises. It works like a charm.

KieslerKakes Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 6:11pm
post #17 of 29

Ok, the DVD was from Sugar Delites - Jennifer Dontz. If you search under Cathyscakes July 8th post she also talks about the wax paper method and how level the cakes are. I suggest you purchase the DVD and see for yourself before deciding it doesn't work.

Bakingangel Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 6:40pm
post #18 of 29

Jennifer Dontz also uses the wet towel wraps to insulate her cakes. That is what helps with the dome problem.

Bakingangel Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 6:59pm
post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by smokeysmokerton

I'm doing a cc tower for my son's bday tomorrow with a six inch cake on top. The first one I made and froze on wed, thawed yesterday. I had a really hard time getting it level and decided to make a new one. I made my baking strips with a towel thinking I wouldn't have to level it and baked at 325. It took forever to bake and when it was done, the sides weren't even brown but the top was really dark. It stuck so badly to the pan around the sides that it was completely unusable. I made two more after that with the same problem both times. Is it possible for the strips to be too wet?

The party is tomorrow, so I accepted defeat and ordered an 8" smooth buttercream cake from Kroger(gasp!) and had it airbrushed blue. It's a spongebob cake and I've already made the fondant accents....so at least it's partly mine. I'm so ashamed! icon_biggrin.gificon_cry.gificon_lol.gificon_redface.gif




I'm sorry you're having a hard time with your cakes.
Here's what I do and it works for me.

I liberally spray Baker's Joy in my pans (sides and bottom) and wrap the outside with the wet strips.

Bake on the middle rack at 325. I let my cakes cool for about 15-20 minutes then turn out on racks to completely cool down.

***

To: Those of you who make your own brush on mixture: I made this once and my cakes had a graininess or grittiness on the outside and I had to trash the cakes. I used the equal parts oil, Crisco, flour and mixed it with my KA a long time until it was creamy. I didn't spread it on too heavily either, you could see the pan through brush strokes. I'm wondering if I did something wrong or if that's the way they come out? Any thoughts?

indydebi Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 7:03pm
post #20 of 29

You folks really buy a special brush to put this stuff on the pans? icon_confused.gif I grab a small sandwich bag or a sheet of wax paper and use that. I dont' want to spend any time picking brush hairs out of my pans that may have come loose from the brush and when I'm done, I dont' have to wash a brush! thumbs_up.gif

mamawrobin Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 7:35pm
post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

You folks really buy a special brush to put this stuff on the pans? icon_confused.gif I grab a small sandwich bag or a sheet of wax paper and use that. I dont' want to spend any time picking brush hairs out of my pans that may have come loose from the brush and when I'm done, I dont' have to wash a brush! thumbs_up.gif




I didn't buy a special one just happen to have one. If something ever happened to it I'd go back to using a paper towel like I use to... icon_lol.gif
I have a really good one and it just don't loose hairs like some I've used...as far as washing...that sucker goes in the dishwasher. thumbs_up.gif

leah_s Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 7:44pm
post #22 of 29

Bakingangel, No I don't have that problem with the outside of the cakes, and even if I did, I'd just rub it off. I've been using homemade pan grease for 10+ years. And yes, i did go to the restaurant supply store and purchase a high quality pastry brush that doesn't shred. icon_smile.gif

Mama_Mias_Cakes Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 7:47pm
post #23 of 29

I'm a brush user. I actually bought a silcone one that doesn't shed.

Marianna46 Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 7:49pm
post #24 of 29

Thanks, y'all, for bringing up the pan grease recipe. I wanted to search for it, but I couldn't for the life of me remember what it was called (okay, no harsh comments about my mental state!). I don't really have any sticking issues with the standard shortening-followed-by-flour method, but it's the step in baking that I always hate! I've always thought that if I could use this one-step method I'd be a much happier camper. I'm off to see whether this is actually true or not.

saapena Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 8:25pm
post #25 of 29

I always use the homemade pan grease with waxed paper on the bottom--the cakes always come out beautifully. I used to buy Wilton's and really liked it, but I found it got rather expensive since I always seem to be baking. icon_biggrin.gif

sweet_honesty Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 9:25pm
post #26 of 29

Homemade pan grease is the reason that I no longer sit on tenterhooks every time I make a bundt cake....

mamawrobin Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 9:46pm
post #27 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweet_honesty

Homemade pan grease is the reason that I no longer sit on tenterhooks every time I make a bundt cake....




Isn't that the truth. I've made several of the giant cupcake cakes and the hm pan grease works great for those.


Leah, I also bought my pastry brush at a restaurant supply store. thumbs_up.gif It doesn't 'shred' at all.

leah_s Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 9:49pm
post #28 of 29

Meh, shred, shed, same effect.

Bakingangel Posted 24 Jul 2010 , 1:58am
post #29 of 29

Thanks, Leah, I'll make another batch and try it again.

Indydebi, thanks for the tip, I like the "not washing the brush" idea too. icon_razz.gif

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