I Am In Need Of Help With A Camo Cake Please.

Decorating By luvbuttercream Updated 25 Jul 2010 , 7:00am by cathyscakes

luvbuttercream Posted 22 Jul 2010 , 5:09pm
post #1 of 13

I have been asked to make a two tier camouflage wedding cake icon_confused.gif . I have never done camo and I don't cover cakes in fondant so I am unsure how to get this effect... I have thought of painting on buttercream... maybe. What are the best colors to use to get the right effect if that will work?? Any help would be greatly appreciated!! TIA

12 replies
kger Posted 22 Jul 2010 , 5:21pm
post #3 of 13
Doug Posted 22 Jul 2010 , 5:22pm
post #4 of 13

color separate blobs of fondant in the colors you want for camo (so if 5 colors -- 5 blobs)

tear off random sized pieces from each blob

flatten them out but leave "thickish"

lay them out randomly touching each other, even overlapping a bit here and there -- do not leave any big gaps.

repeat until large area covered

bring on the rolling pin and smoosh it all out flat and smooth -- in the process of doing this the pieces will meld together to get a single sheet.

and there's your camo.

preseliz Posted 22 Jul 2010 , 5:29pm
post #5 of 13

I have made a few camo cakes and I did a two tiered camo cake, as well, with all buttercream. It's in my pictures. It's obviously not that great as far as the bulging (first two tiered I ever did) and I foolishly didn't add a border around the tiers (another dumb, rookie mistake) but the camo part actually turned out really well. I simply made different colors of buttercream (I don't care for fondant) and after crumbcoating I went back and used a round tip and just made the random camo designs for the various colors. Once it had all crusted over, I went back and smoothed it all with a Viva paper towel and Voila!

Good luck! It's very easy to do, actually, just a little time consuming.

Aeropanda Posted 22 Jul 2010 , 5:39pm
post #6 of 13

I learned Doug's method the hard way after doing one that took so long it dried out and the pieces looked like they would fall apart. If you don't like the fondant, preseliz's idea seems like a good one! Best of luck!

luvbuttercream Posted 22 Jul 2010 , 5:52pm
post #7 of 13

Thank you all for the advice. TexasSugar those tutorials are great and exactly what I needed!!! Thank you all again so much!

cathyscakes Posted 22 Jul 2010 , 5:56pm
post #8 of 13

I know you said you didn't do fondant, but its so easy. I took three colored pieces of fondant and made logs, and twisted them together, and roll out and cover the cakes, it makes it so easy. I made a grooms cake that I did this method for the elk hunters clothes.

luvbuttercream Posted 22 Jul 2010 , 6:04pm
post #9 of 13

cathyscakes: I am sure it is pretty easy I just have never covered a cake in fondant and am not wanting to make someones wedding cake my first try. And it isn't really something I have time to practice for as it was a last minute request and is needed next week. But I would love to try that technique in the future I am sure my son would love a camo cake, and if it isn't perfect well then it doesn't really matter...LOL

dguerrant Posted 22 Jul 2010 , 6:36pm
post #10 of 13

do you have an airbrush?

that's what i use. I frost my cake usually with a light tan and let it crust over, I never place them back into the fridge, the sweating is a nightmare on the camo effect. While it's crusting, i use stiff paper or acetate (transparancy sheets, or thin plastic like tab dividers for binders. cut out various sized leaves (several on the sheet). I like to do a couple so they are different. once crusted, i start with the lighter color and place the stencil on the cake and spray, rotate sparay again , so on and so on. let the color dry and the add another color ontop of that. build it up in thin layers, and go back and add some shadows and simple veining for definition.

i have uploaded a couple of pics, check them out to see what it looks like finished icon_smile.gif if you have any questions let me know.

luvbuttercream Posted 22 Jul 2010 , 6:41pm
post #11 of 13

dianaguerrant: I love the look of your camo! Unfortunately I do not have an airbrush system right now. I do plan on getting one one day, especially after seeing your cake icon_biggrin.gif

dguerrant Posted 22 Jul 2010 , 6:50pm
post #12 of 13

well thanks, my husband got me an airbrush for a christmas gift the first year we were together (5 years ago), he recently upgraded that one for a stystem that has 6 different brushes and lines so i don't have to change them out icon_biggrin.gif i use it for tie dye effects, spray my finished cakes, just about everything, i couldn't imagine not having it. He got my new set up from Harbor Freight Tools for about $150 and i already had the compressor, that is the expensive part, but if you watch for Hobby Lobby or Micheals coupons, you can get one there and save some $. Good Luck, do what I do, set a business goal and apply all/part of the money toward that, and before you know it you're there. My next goal is a Cake Safe icon_biggrin.gif

cathyscakes Posted 25 Jul 2010 , 7:00am
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by luvbuttercream

cathyscakes: I am sure it is pretty easy I just have never covered a cake in fondant and am not wanting to make someones wedding cake my first try. And it isn't really something I have time to practice for as it was a last minute request and is needed next week. But I would love to try that technique in the future I am sure my son would love a camo cake, and if it isn't perfect well then it doesn't really matter...LOL


I know what you mean, I have been doing cakes on and off for years and no one ever wanted fondant. I did my first cake covered in fondant a month ago, a wedding cake. I didn't practice, used jennifer dontz's fondant recipe, never used it before, I was scared to death. So many firsts, I should have practiced, but I didn't. It turned out great, I couldn't believe how easy it was. I have watched so many cake shows where they have so much trouble with fondant, so I didn't think I could do it. It went on so nice, didn't have a wrinkle or blemish anywhere. Now its how I would like to do every cake. I did get Jennifers video, and she walks you through the process, and I didn't have a bit of problems. I was taking alot of risk, doing the wedding cake without practicing, and like I said I was so stressed out about it. But it did work out, I think her fondant was the key, it had such a long work time, didn't dry out or crack, it worked great. I know you could do it too, but I sure understand you not wanting to experiment on a wedding cake.

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