Magic Line Pans Went In The Dishwasher

Decorating By SecretAgentCakeBaker Updated 1 Aug 2010 , 10:13pm by elvisb

SecretAgentCakeBaker Posted 20 Jul 2010 , 11:25am
post #1 of 24

During a visit to relative, I made a cake for uncle's birthday. The cakes were in the oven when I had to leave for church, so my dear aunt said she would take them out (they were close to being done, but I could not wait any longer.) When we got back, I find that my aunt put my 3 Magic Line cake pans into the dishwasher. I stopped the cycle, but it was close to finishing and the damage had already been done.

There are no pits in the pans yet, but the finish is destroyed. I compared to my other pans. They are no longer shiny and they feel funny. Can I still use these or are they now going to leech aluminum into the cakes, or make the cakes look or taste funny?


No, I'm not going to make my aunt buy me new pans. She is too dear and does so much for my entire family. I cannot be upset with her; I know she was just trying to help me.

Thanks for your help!

23 replies
KHalstead Posted 20 Jul 2010 , 11:49am
post #2 of 24

I put mine in the dishwasher all the time, aside from not being shiny I haven't noticed ANY change in the way the pan bakes the cakes!

tenleysmommy Posted 20 Jul 2010 , 11:57am
post #3 of 24

When my hubby does the dishes he always puts them in the dishwasher!I can't tell him not to,he might stop doing them : )

Karen421 Posted 20 Jul 2010 , 11:59am
post #4 of 24

I put a couple of the smaller ones in the dishwasher and they are just fine.

Doug Posted 20 Jul 2010 , 12:03pm
post #5 of 24

as for aluminum leaching....

if any did, it already has .

it would leach every time you used them, shiny or not.

gourmetsharon Posted 20 Jul 2010 , 12:12pm
post #6 of 24

I never put any of my non-stick baking or frying pans into the dishwasher. The dishwasher powder/soap makes them less non-stick over time. It is best to hand wash any type of non-stick pan.

Sorry about your pans. They are probably fine to use.

nhbaker Posted 20 Jul 2010 , 12:23pm
post #7 of 24

My DH has done the same with my pans. They discolored but still work fine. Have used them MANY time with no issues.

Mixer attachments are a different story! My DH put the whip & paddle attachment in and they came out discolored and coated. My fingers turned black when I touched them. No way I was going to let them touch cake batter or icing so I spent an hour scrubbing them with SOS pads to get the gray off. It worked thank goodness!

Needless to say my DH doesn't help pick up after I'm done a cake anymore!!

dsilvest Posted 20 Jul 2010 , 12:41pm
post #8 of 24

Try making a paste of baking soda and water and scrub the pans. I have cast aluminum pots that are 50+ years old and clean them this way every once in a while if they are really discoloured.

deah Posted 20 Jul 2010 , 1:36pm
post #9 of 24

Barkeepers Friend will work also.

leah_s Posted 20 Jul 2010 , 1:38pm
post #10 of 24

The pans may not be as pretty, but they will work fine.

SecretAgentCakeBaker Posted 1 Aug 2010 , 1:13pm
post #11 of 24

Thanks! I was asking because I used to put my professional grade 1/4 & 1/2 sheet baking pans (the ones like cookie sheets) into the dishwasher. The first time I put them in the dishwasher they got that dull cast to them, but I didn't think anything of it. Over the next several washings, the aluminum pitted terribly and the pans no longer work properly. It happened after about 5-8 washes. I had later read somewhere that something in the dishwasher detergent destroys the aluminum.


I also know that acid will eat away at aluminum. Have you ever made lasagna or baked ziti and covered it with aluminum foil, then later see all these tiny holes in the foil and black specks over the top of the sauce? Those black specks are the aluminum. The acid in the tomato sauce corroded it.

My mother-in-law used to make her sauce in an aluminum pot. I thought it tasted awful and didn't like to eat it, her son loved it and didn't like anyone else's sauce because it didn't taste like hers. She finally switched to a stainless steel pot and her sauce tastes good now. I'm convinced it was the aluminum pot causing the bad taste.

I had also heard that aluminum is being considered one cause for Alzheimer's. My father-in-law has early onset Alzheimer's. I worry about my husband getting Alzheimer's now, so you can understand why I am just super cautious about stuff like this.

I just googled it and am finding conflicting info, but for anyone interested, here's what i found so far. Pans like we are talking about are anodized. That is some kind of process using acetone and electricity to change the surface of the aluminum, making it very hard. The caustic dishwasher detergent, coupled with the high heat, can erode this hard surface. Using my Sherlock Holmes deductive reasoning, I wonder if the damaged surface can now allow the aluminum to leach into the food. I think I will err on the side of caution for now and not use my pans until I can find out for sure.

I was hoping that those of you who had taken the food safety courses had learned anything about it. I'm still interested in hearing what anybody here knows, and I will continue to attempt to research this. I'll post if I find out anything interesting.

Thanks again!

gourmetsharon Posted 1 Aug 2010 , 1:24pm
post #12 of 24

Who needs Food Detective (Ted Allen) when we have SecretAgentCakeBaker!

Thanks for the info.

SecretAgentCakeBaker Posted 1 Aug 2010 , 1:34pm
post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by gourmetsharon

Who needs Food Detective (Ted Allen) when we have SecretAgentCakeBaker!

Thanks for the info.




Sorry, I wasn't intending to insult anyone; I hope I didn't. We love science in our house and tend to research things a lot.

Yep, we love shows like Food Detectives, Mythbusters, and the how-things-are-made type etc. Especially my 8-year old daughter. Oh, and her birthday party this year was a spy theme!! icon_smile.gif Yeah, we're family of geeks! icon_rolleyes.gif (She can't decide if she wants to be a spy or a piece of California roll sushi (her favorite food) for Halloween this year. Her agent name at her party was Secret Agent Sushi.)

ALR1955 Posted 1 Aug 2010 , 1:36pm
post #14 of 24

I have had my cake pans for over 25 year. I haven't had a problem.
It would be interesting to know you research results. Keep us informed.

gourmetsharon Posted 1 Aug 2010 , 4:35pm
post #15 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by SecretAgentCakeBaker

Quote:
Originally Posted by gourmetsharon

Who needs Food Detective (Ted Allen) when we have SecretAgentCakeBaker!

Thanks for the info.



Sorry, I wasn't intending to insult anyone; I hope I didn't. We love science in our house and tend to research things a lot.

Yep, we love shows like Food Detectives, Mythbusters, and the how-things-are-made type etc. Especially my 8-year old daughter. Oh, and her birthday party this year was a spy theme!! icon_smile.gif Yeah, we're family of geeks! icon_rolleyes.gif (She can't decide if she wants to be a spy or a piece of California roll sushi (her favorite food) for Halloween this year. Her agent name at her party was Secret Agent Sushi.)





Yup, we're a family of geeks too! Love your daughter's dilemma!

kansaslaura Posted 1 Aug 2010 , 4:53pm
post #16 of 24

There is something in me since I was a kid that always NEEDS to know WHY something does what it does. My mother was and still is a woman who believes that "because I said so" is plenty fine answer to any child. I remember being so frustrated and anxious as a kid because all I wanted to know is why and how!!

I remember being told by a home-ec teacher (boy did that date me!) how to mix a cake. dry, wet, dry, wet, dry--you know the drill. Of course I asked WHY??? She honestly didn't know and said because that is what the book said. So for many years, because I didn't know why and it seemed like a bother, I didn't do it.

Now I know better.

Now, thanks to my two favorite books.. On Food and Cooking and How Baking Works, Alton Brown, and the internet I'm one happy happy camper! Its the curious and questioning among us that have been responsible for every invention, cure and crazy gadget we own!


I love any thread that digs deep like this.. GEEK ON!! thumbs_up.gif

Adevag Posted 1 Aug 2010 , 5:53pm
post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by kansaslaura

There is something in me since I was a kid that always NEEDS to know WHY something does what it does. My mother was and still is a woman who believes that "because I said so" is plenty fine answer to any child. I remember being so frustrated and anxious as a kid because all I wanted to know is why and how!!

I remember being told by a home-ec teacher (boy did that date me!) how to mix a cake. dry, wet, dry, wet, dry--you know the drill. Of course I asked WHY??? She honestly didn't know and said because that is what the book said. So for many years, because I didn't know why and it seemed like a bother, I didn't do it.

Now I know better.

Now, thanks to my two favorite books.. On Food and Cooking and How Baking Works, Alton Brown, and the internet I'm one happy happy camper! Its the curious and questioning among us that have been responsible for every invention, cure and crazy gadget we own!


I love any thread that digs deep like this.. GEEK ON!! thumbs_up.gif




I love when kids ask "why" and I LOVE that children are so curious. My kids ask me all the time how things work and why things are the way they are. When I don't know (or when I want them to see something rather than getting it explained by me) it's so easy today because we just google any topic. And then we all learn from it.

deMuralist Posted 1 Aug 2010 , 6:14pm
post #18 of 24

[quote="kansaslaura"]There is something in me since I was a kid that always NEEDS to know WHY something does what it does. My mother was and still is a woman who believes that "because I said so" is plenty fine answer to any child. I remember being so frustrated and anxious as a kid because all I wanted to know is why and how!!

I remember being told by a home-ec teacher (boy did that date me!) how to mix a cake. dry, wet, dry, wet, dry--you know the drill. Of course I asked WHY??? She honestly didn't know and said because that is what the book said. So for many years, because I didn't know why and it seemed like a bother, I didn't do it.

Now I know better.

Now, thanks to my two favorite books.. On Food and Cooking and How Baking Works, Alton Brown, and the internet I'm one happy happy camper! Its the curious and questioning among us that have been responsible for every invention, cure and crazy gadget we own!


I love any thread that digs deep like this.. GEEK ON!! thumbs_up.gif[/quote]


opps=edited to add- ditto! I also really like Shirley Corriher who wrote "Cookwise" don't care for the recipes in it, but the info is invaluable!!!!

gourmetsharon Posted 1 Aug 2010 , 8:45pm
post #19 of 24

ok, so what's the theory on the dry, wet, dry, wet for the cake ingredients??

kansaslaura Posted 1 Aug 2010 , 9:34pm
post #20 of 24

Mixing in stages helps to preserve the little bubbles produced in the creaming of the sugar and butter. Adding all the liquid or dry at once can destroy those bubbles and produce a dense, rather that light and moist cake. It's a gentle way to introduce those ingredients.

LisaPeps Posted 1 Aug 2010 , 9:46pm
post #21 of 24

My On Food and Cooking (although I had to get the McGee on Food and Cooking: An Encyclopedia of Kitchen Science, History and Culture one rather than the original as amazon.co.uk only had it for £50.. which is approx $80.. slightly on the expensive side...) and How Baking Works books are in the post ^___^ Glad I read this post now icon_smile.gif

kansaslaura Posted 1 Aug 2010 , 9:58pm
post #22 of 24

Those books can be a little pricey--they're text books and those run big $$'s I either got mine from half.com or eBay, I don't remember. There is also several used textbook sites you may be able to find them on.

gourmetsharon Posted 1 Aug 2010 , 10:09pm
post #23 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by kansaslaura

Mixing in stages helps to preserve the little bubbles produced in the creaming of the sugar and butter. Adding all the liquid or dry at once can destroy those bubbles and produce a dense, rather that light and moist cake. It's a gentle way to introduce those ingredients.




Ah, ha! Interesting. I never knew that myself. Thanks!
You can teach an old dog new tricks!

elvisb Posted 1 Aug 2010 , 10:13pm
post #24 of 24

I put all my pans in the dishwasher as long as they say they are dishwasher safe. They are a little darker and not shiny anymore, but mine are not pitted at all and I've never noticed a taste or anything on the cakes. I figure it beats spending all that time standing at the sink when a machine can do it for me. icon_smile.gif

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