Help Needed

Decorating By manomi Updated 21 Jul 2010 , 1:14am by manomi

manomi Posted 20 Jul 2010 , 2:11am
post #1 of 10

Hi everyone,
I need some opinion on doing this cake. I was thinking of using a pillar and separator plate for the tree..I have never used one. I understand that u use the pillar the goes inside the bottom tier and then use the separator plate on the top of the pillar. Is it right? How does the top tier (the leaves part) stay put? Also any ideas on how to attach the branches to it? Thanks.
LL

9 replies
Doug Posted 20 Jul 2010 , 3:33am
post #2 of 10

easier --

wood base....

central wooden dowel glued and screwed to base like this:
http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-photo_1420079.html

then another wood plate on top of dowel, glued and screwed like base.

adjust length of dowel to get height need.

drill small holes into to dowel and insert wire (18 gauge or so) to form the branches.

manomi Posted 20 Jul 2010 , 5:01am
post #3 of 10

okay, thanks! but i have never tried drilling and all..Won't the separator plates and pillars work?

aprilblack Posted 20 Jul 2010 , 10:44am
post #4 of 10

Ditto to Doug icon_smile.gif I would go with the wood base as well.. You can use RKT for the tree around the wooden dowel. If you notice how thick the cake board is, that looks exactly what the original caker did!

manomi Posted 20 Jul 2010 , 5:13pm
post #5 of 10

Okay,so let me get this straight..I use the base, put the screw in it and then hammer the dowel in the screw? then do i slide the cake thru the dowel?? Then for the top base, i screw and g;ue it to the dowel? sorry,but i have never tried this..

mamawrobin Posted 20 Jul 2010 , 5:19pm
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by aprilblack

Ditto to Doug icon_smile.gif I would go with the wood base as well.. You can use RKT for the tree around the wooden dowel. If you notice how thick the cake board is, that looks exactly what the original caker did!




I agree with Doug. thumbs_up.gif You asks for advice and got the best icon_wink.gif

Doug Posted 20 Jul 2010 , 6:22pm
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by marianauman

Okay,so let me get this straight..I use the base, put the screw in it and then hammer the dowel in the screw? then do i slide the cake thru the dowel?? Then for the top base, i screw and g;ue it to the dowel? sorry,but i have never tried this..




LOL -- you remind of a student I had once who was helping try to build the set for a play. I heard "bad" words from him as he pounded away with a hammer. Went over to see what was up. Found him trying to hammer a screw in. Nope, we screw screws; we hammer nails. Introduced him to the modern marvel of a portable electric drill. But, hey, not his fault. He'd lived in an apartment all his life and they just called the "super" when anything broke.

so here's how it goes:

step 1: get circle of mdf or plywood for the base. This should be at least 1/2" thick, better is 3/4". I usually suggest 2x the diameter of the circle that will be on top of the dowel. So if cake will be on an 10" circle, base would be 18 to 20". This helps to keep it all from tipping over and lets you go higher. The wider the base the higher you can go.

step 2: get circle for top of dowel. this can be thin masonite

(re 1 & 2 -- 1 can be done with one of those $10 instant decor 3-legged tables that they sell at places like Bed Bath & Beyond. http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/product.asp?SKU=123601&RN=2032& #2 will have to custom cut or ordered most likely (check local cake supply for precut masonite)

step 3: get a dowel--at least 1/2" in diameter, better 3/4" or even a full inch. Remember the thicker the dowel, the higher you can go and more stable it will be. Length = distance you want bottom of top plate to be from top of base + half the thickness of base.

step 4: using a spade bit that matches diameter of dowel -- drill a hole dead center into base that only goes maximum of 1/2 thickness of base. If possible use a bit that is a "scosh" smaller so will have a tight fit. spade bit: http://www.homedepot.ca/wcsstore/HomeDepotCanada/images/catalog/SB5005RGB_476789_4.jpg

step 5: using a regular drill bit that matches the thickness of the SHAFT of screw you will use -- do not include threads in measurement -- drill a whole dead center in the hole you just put in the base. go all the way through.

step 6: using same bit, drill hole dead center in top plate that goes all the way through.

step 7: using same bit, drill pilot holes dead center in BOTH ends of dowel. Go in deep enough to match length of screw.

step 8: squirt carpenters glue into half way through hole in base and spread all around and work some into one hole in dowel.

step 9: force dowel into halfway through hole, may have to use hammer to encourage. wipe off glue that squeezes out.

step 10: flip this assembly home and put screw in predrilled holes of base and dowel. Can help to dip screw in carpenters glue.

step 11: lay assembly down as it will stand and work some glue in hole in top of dowel.

step 12: center top disk's hole with hole in dowel and screw in place.

ready to go!

---

note: screws should be FLAT head and made for wood. Phillips drive works better than slot type.

manomi Posted 20 Jul 2010 , 8:14pm
post #8 of 10

Thanks Doug! you're the best thumbs_up.gif That was sooo detailed!
One last question icon_redface.gif Do i slide the cake thru the dowel?

Doug Posted 20 Jul 2010 , 10:04pm
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by marianauman

Thanks Doug! you're the best thumbs_up.gif That was sooo detailed!
One last question icon_redface.gif Do i slide the cake thru the dowel?




yes. that would be:

10.1) cover base with "whatever" (cake foil, fondant, etc.)

10.2) cut a core out of base cake (apple corer will work -- make multiple cuts as necessary to get hole big enough to accept dowel) OF COURSE the cake is on a cake board that has already had the proper size hole cut out

10.3) slide base cake down over dowel

manomi Posted 21 Jul 2010 , 1:14am
post #10 of 10

Thanks! icon_biggrin.gif

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