Fondant Questions

Decorating By ohayr639 Updated 22 Jul 2010 , 2:42am by ohayr639

ohayr639 Posted 19 Jul 2010 , 3:47pm
post #1 of 11

I am going to be covering a cake next week with fondant and wanted to practice this week as it will only be my 2nd fondant cake. It is for back to school, I teach and we are starting back next week so I wanted to give everyone something good to come back to!

1. What is the best way to roll out enough fondant, all the same thickness, for a 10in square without the use of a sheeter?

2. Any other tips you have about covering a cake that big would be greatly appreciated as well!

3. I have read a lot about ganache vs buttercream and really not sure which way to go, any suggestions?

Thanks so much! icon_biggrin.gif

10 replies
ohayr639 Posted 20 Jul 2010 , 2:53pm
post #2 of 11

Any help would be appreciated!

AnotherCreation Posted 20 Jul 2010 , 3:07pm
post #3 of 11

Old fashion rolling pin!!!!! I just keep running my hand over it to feel if it is the same thickness and if not I roll some more. Some use a vinyl mat to roll the fondant on. I use the counter coated with a little p/s ( if it's a dark colored fondant I use shortening) I usually just measure how much fondant I have rolled out by using a cake board the size of the cake I am doing and add about 3 inches on each side. When I feel I have enough, I roll the fondant up with the rolling pin to the center and lift to put on the cake. This way I know where the center is. AS far as b/c and ganache. I have never used ganache, just a crusting b/c. There are a lot that swear by using ganach though. hth

mamawrobin Posted 20 Jul 2010 , 3:41pm
post #4 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohayr639

I am going to be covering a cake next week with fondant and wanted to practice this week as it will only be my 2nd fondant cake. It is for back to school, I teach and we are starting back next week so I wanted to give everyone something good to come back to!

1. What is the best way to roll out enough fondant, all the same thickness, for a 10in square without the use of a sheeter?

[i][b]Rolling pin...I have the one by Wilton and I also have a piece of PVC pipe that is 26" long (cost me $3.00) that I use for larger cakes. Never have used a sheeter. Once I've rolled it out I kind of push my rolling pin over the fondant to make sure that I have it the same thickness acro
ss.


2. Any other tips you have about covering a cake that big would be greatly appreciated as well!
Roll your fondant on a vinyl mat and flip the entire thing over onto your cake...peel the vinyl off the fondant..it's a lot easier to do it this way than trying to move the fondant to the cake with your rolling pin. It helps me prevent tearing.
3. I have read a lot about ganache vs buttercream and really not sure which way to go, any suggestions?
either will work...ganache will give you sharper corners and a firmer foundation for your fondant. If you do use buttercream it's recommend that you use a thin crumbcoat for the best results when covering with fondant, rather than a regular coat of bc.

Thanks so much! icon_biggrin.gif




You can buy vinyl by the yard at some Wal-Marts and most fabric stores. I paid $2.22 a yard for mine at Wal-Mart. thumbs_up.gif

ohayr639 Posted 20 Jul 2010 , 4:14pm
post #5 of 11

Thanks so much!

Amberly10 Posted 20 Jul 2010 , 9:17pm
post #6 of 11

Great idea about using flipping vinyl and all onto the cake. My fondant always tears when I am trying to transfer it onto my cake. Thanksicon_smile.gif

aej6 Posted 20 Jul 2010 , 9:45pm
post #7 of 11

Today I, on vinyl, cut out the shape for the cake I am doing. I put powdered sugar on the vinyl.
Any thoughts on the best way to remove the PS once I flip the fondant on to the cake?
Thanks again...this place is SOOOO helpful!

Rylan Posted 20 Jul 2010 , 9:52pm
post #8 of 11

I prefer ganache better. It gives a nice stable base and helps me achieve sharper edges.

ohayr639 Posted 20 Jul 2010 , 10:01pm
post #9 of 11

So how thick should the crumbcoat be?

I am worried about the people that don't eat fondant and I work in the kind of school that someone will probably think I did it on purpose!

Also, I am worried about ganache. I tried to make it once and messed it up. Any advice on making that would be appreciated too!

Rylan Posted 21 Jul 2010 , 9:51pm
post #10 of 11

A crumbcoat is really thin--it is usually done just to seal the crumbs.

There is a ganache tutorial on my signature. That is what I usually use =]

ohayr639 Posted 22 Jul 2010 , 2:42am
post #11 of 11

DUH!!! If I would have just read that probably would have helped! Thanks again! I am sure I will have more questions later!

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