Do You Frost Your Layers While Frozen?

Decorating By iLVbkng Updated 14 Jul 2010 , 11:44pm by JulieMN

iLVbkng Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 8:55pm
post #1 of 8

I am get some conflicting answers on this so I figured Ill ask all of you...

I have my cake frozen right now and I am planning on torting and crumbcoating my cake on Friday and serve on Sat.

My question is do you wait for the cakes to defrost completely before torting and crumbcoating them or can I do that while they are defrosting?

TIA!

7 replies
Texas_Rose Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 9:01pm
post #2 of 8

Let it thaw first. There are lots of issues that can happen when frosting a frozen cake, which you can avoid just by letting it thaw out first icon_biggrin.gif It doesn't take very long to thaw a cake.

catlharper Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 9:19pm
post #3 of 8

I bake, cool, level, torte, wrap, freeze, unwrap, fill and crumbcoat while frozen and then leave to settle/come to room temp for at least 3 hours...more if I have the time and this is why.

If you wait till the cake is cool and then level and torte it's easier to do than to try to cut a frozen cake. When you bring it out of the freezer, all those lovely little ice crystals are going to give your cake moisture..if you let it thaw out you may have to deal with some soggy cake edges to try to crumbcoat but if you fill/crumbcoat while frozen then it locks in the moisture. BUT you never want to do your final coat on a cold cake so let the cake come up to room temperature before putting on that final coat of BC or fondant. This is because as it comes to room temp it will expell air and gas bubbles...thru a thin crumbcoat that's no problem...just smooth the splooshes and cover...but if you have put on a final coat it can actually make a huge bubble that can distort your cake. Also, if you give it that time it will have a chance to settle, thus giving you less of a chance of having that mid cake bulge from filling splooshing out as the cake settles. So the settling part is really important. Even a room temp cake needs settling time (lots put tiles on the cake to help this process but if you are waiting for a cake to come to room temp then this won't help you anyway).

HTH

Cat

Kitagrl Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 9:21pm
post #4 of 8

Chilled, but not frozen.

Actually yesterday I took a frozen round out of the freezer and iced it, frozen, for my family to eat for dessert for later...this morning I noticed a crack in the top, from the cake expanding with the warmth under the buttercream.

So I don't think it'd be a great idea to ice it frozen for a customer...chilled, but not completely frozen solid.

mamawrobin Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 10:12pm
post #5 of 8

I don't even crumbcoat a frozen or very cold cake. I use Indydebi's buttercream and I have issues with it crusting on a frozen or cold cake. I did crumbcoat and ice a frozen cake ONCE. It took close to forever to crust icon_lol.gif

catlharper Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 10:15pm
post #6 of 8

Robin,

I think that's the difference between AR and CA...humidity. I don't have any problems with crusting (same recipe) on a frozen cake but my humidity levels are NOWHERE near where yours are. What is it today anyways...I hear that there is rain in your area? It's going to be 99 and 22% humidity.

Cat

mamawrobin Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 10:42pm
post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by catlharper

Robin,

I think that's the difference between AR and CA...humidity. I don't have any problems with crusting (same recipe) on a frozen cake but my humidity levels are NOWHERE near where yours are. What is it today anyways...I hear that there is rain in your area? It's going to be 99 and 22% humidity.

Cat




Cat, you are absolutely right about the humidity. That's why I'm always whinning about the humidity issues. icon_lol.gif It rained here yesterday for about 20 minutes and after the rain the humidity was suffocating. It really isn't the heat here as much as it is the humidity. And don't even get me started on "bad hair days." icon_lol.gif My dad always says that's what he misses most about California is the climate. High humidity sucks, it really does. thumbsdown.gif

JulieMN Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 11:44pm
post #8 of 8

No I don't....we have humidity issues here too.....

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