Cake Dummies 101

Decorating By Jeep_girl816 Updated 17 Aug 2010 , 7:16pm by Cindy619

Jeep_girl816 Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 7:23pm
post #1 of 21

Ok, so I just ordered my dummy set, from eBay, and I don't expect to have any issues, I mostly work in fondant, so I was just wondering if those of you who use dummies cover them cover them with frosting or ganache before fondant? Or do you just spray with a little water and go for it? Any info or advice would be appreciated icon_smile.gif

20 replies
catlharper Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 7:27pm
post #2 of 21

I just spray a little water..actually I use a damp napkin<G> on the dummy then cover. No problems!

Cakelayer Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 7:28pm
post #3 of 21

I recently asked the exact same question. I was told that all you need is a spray of water under the fondant - no buttercream or anything else.

DianaJJ

adonisthegreek1 Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 7:29pm
post #4 of 21

When I want a very smooth finish then I put buttercream (all Crisco) underneath. If it's just practice and I don't care if you can see the imperfections of the foam underneath (although it is subtle) I use just a little Crisco.

TexasSugar Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 7:30pm
post #5 of 21

I've sprayed it with water, just make sure it is a very light mist, you want it slightly damp but not wet, it will melt your fondant if it is too wet.

I've also brushed the cake with piping gel and corn syrup.

You don't have to ice it like a cake, because you are already starting with a smooth even surface, so you are just looking for something to help it adhear to it.

Cindy619 Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 7:33pm
post #6 of 21

I usually just use a spritz of water as well.

LuluSweetArt Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 7:35pm
post #7 of 21

I just smear mine with crisco on a paper towel. Works great and smooths out any little imperfections.

Jeep_girl816 Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 8:20pm
post #8 of 21

Yay! less work for me= more time doing the fun stuff, the actual decorating!!! Thanks so much for all your answers! icon_biggrin.gif

BlakesCakes Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 8:26pm
post #9 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuluSweetArt

I just smear mine with crisco on a paper towel. Works great and smooths out any little imperfections.




Me, too!

Cheap, easy, and the crisco acts as a filler and a glue!

Rae

Darlene Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 9:12pm
post #10 of 21

I also use Crisco. It's also easier to reuse the dummy as the fondant will peel right off when you wish!

catlharper Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 9:14pm
post #11 of 21

You know, I've used water but I think I'm gonna try the Crisco thing this week. I have fondant covered dummy seperators for a cake this weekend...gonna try the Crisco thing for those! Thanx!

Cat

JustGettinStarted Posted 14 Aug 2010 , 3:31am
post #12 of 21

Hello, I'm new here and, as my screen name states, I'm just getting started in this cake making fun.

I am wanting to practice on dummy cakes, but I have no idea where to begin. Where do I get them? Can I just buy some plain foam? What kind should it be?

TIA!

Jeep_girl816 Posted 14 Aug 2010 , 4:22am
post #13 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustGettinStarted

Hello, I'm new here and, as my screen name states, I'm just getting started in this cake making fun.

I am wanting to practice on dummy cakes, but I have no idea where to begin. Where do I get them? Can I just buy some plain foam? What kind should it be?

TIA!


I got mine off ebay- less than $20 for a set, including shipping! Just search for "Cake Dummies". And thanks for the crisco idea, Adonis and lulu! I never would have though of that!

lorieleann Posted 14 Aug 2010 , 5:45am
post #14 of 21

i'm going to try that crisco idea! thumbs_up.gif

one tip i read and did when i did my first dummy cakes was to take a fine grain of sand paper and go around the edges of the dummies. Just enough to take off the sharpness so that it doesn't tear on your fondant.

cabecakes Posted 15 Aug 2010 , 2:02am
post #15 of 21

I use crisco too.

amandaluvscakes Posted 17 Aug 2010 , 1:31am
post #16 of 21

I took a fondant class a few years back from Carrie Biggers (Carries Cakes -in Utah) and she gave a great tip for covering the dummies which is great especially helpful if you are new to fondant. Take a scrap piece of styro-foam and rub it along the top edge of your cake dummy. This rounds the edge and helps so the fondant doesn't tear since the corners are so sharp. Id you want sharp corners just leave them alone - but I really like this look.

teresa13 Posted 17 Aug 2010 , 4:18am
post #17 of 21

If you use dummies as part of a wedding cake - how much do you charge for decorating the dummies?

JustGettinStarted Posted 17 Aug 2010 , 5:26pm
post #18 of 21

Where I live our local cake supply store sells cake dummy styrofoam. How do you wash them?

Also, I called for pricing on them..a 10" round is 5.99 and a 12" round is 6.99...is that a fair price or should I just try to order some online?

Oh, and if I do use them to practice stacking cakes, do I need to put the dowels in them as well?

Thanks so much!

Erin3085 Posted 17 Aug 2010 , 6:10pm
post #19 of 21

So I'm a little confused....are cake dummies for practicing fondant decorating or are they for adding to cakes when someone wants the look of a big cake but not all the actual cake?....

Vimalai21 Posted 17 Aug 2010 , 6:28pm
post #20 of 21

This is just a side note but I just ordered some dummies from the foam studio dot com and i received excellent customer service from them. I calles and spoke to Brian who is the owner and he was nothing but helpful and they have awesome price. you guys should check them out. As far as cake dummies go. I think they can be used for both practicing and adding high or wow factor for a cake that a customer wants to purchase. And as far as pricing goes a cake with a dummy ends up being about the same bc u still have to do all the work to decorate that tier. HTH

Cindy619 Posted 17 Aug 2010 , 7:16pm
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Erin3085

So I'm a little confused....are cake dummies for practicing fondant decorating or are they for adding to cakes when someone wants the look of a big cake but not all the actual cake?....




Both and some! Cake dummies are excellent for practicing, adding height and size to real cakes, as well as making cake displays to showcase your work.

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