How To Prevent Cake Balls From Sweating In The Fridge? W/pic

Decorating By Artsygurl Updated 13 Jul 2010 , 7:28pm by katnmouse

Artsygurl Posted 13 Jul 2010 , 2:37am
post #1 of 9

I made a batch of cake balls tonight and used Wilton melting chocolate as a coating. After I dipped them I put them in the fridge on a wax paper covered tray. After a little while they began to "sweat" and now I see that they've started to dry. Where it's now dry, the chocolate coating turned a dusty light brown color....not attractive. (See picture below)

Does anyone know how to prevent this from happening? Would sealing them in a container after dipping fix this problem?


P.s.- I used Hershey's milk chocolate on another batch and this didn't happen, but I very much prefer the taste of Wilton's chocolate on the cake balls more so than Hershey's.
LL

8 replies
BlakesCakes Posted 13 Jul 2010 , 2:46am
post #2 of 9

That's not sweat. It's fat coming to the surface. And the spots are the cold fat.

It's ironic that you had better results with the Hershey's because it's real chocolate and needs to be in temper in order to not have the same thing happen.

I'd guess that with the candy melts, they got too hot when being melted. Although they don't technically require tempering, if they overheat, the fats separate and cause this fat "bloom".

I melt candy melts in the microwave in a microwave safe plastic bowl (never glass) for short bursts at 50% power, stir, and repeat until they're about 90% melted. I stir it until the rest melt and they're smooth.

HTH
Rae

Artsygurl Posted 13 Jul 2010 , 2:54am
post #3 of 9

Wow that's really interesting. I never would have thought it was fat coming through. This may have happened because I used Crisco to thin out the chocolate in order to make the dipping process a little easier and quicker. Next time I won't use any Crisco.

Thanks for the helpful tip!!

BlakesCakes Posted 13 Jul 2010 , 2:59am
post #4 of 9

The crisco could have contributed to the problem. Too much and you have no emulsion, so the fat breaks away from the solids quickly.

Rule of thumb is that if you want shiny chocolates with a nice snap when you bite them, thin with paramount crystals for dipping consistency.
if you want softer chocolate for some reason, use shortening or veg. oil to thin. These will be duller, too.

HTH
Rae

Artsygurl Posted 13 Jul 2010 , 3:04am
post #5 of 9

Thanks icon_smile.gif Where can I find paramount crystals? I've never heard of them

BlakesCakes Posted 13 Jul 2010 , 3:08am
post #6 of 9

Most cake supply shops carry them. You can find them online (search froogle.com ).

Rae

katnmouse Posted 13 Jul 2010 , 3:09am
post #7 of 9

Do not eliminate the Crisco. You won't be able to get the candy thin enough consistency to dip them without the Crisco...unless you overheat the candy then you have the same problem you have now. I know because I have done the same thing you did with the same results. Melt your candy in 30 second increments to start with and stir each time the timer beeps. When melting starts then stop it every 15 seconds or so and stir until it appears that the candy is melted small lumps of solid candy may still be present but you will stir them until they melt into the mix. Now is when you stir in 1-2 Tbsp of Crisco until the candy is sufficiently liquid for dipping. The heat from the melted candy is all you need to melt the Crisco. The Crisco helps "temper" the candy to a lower temp. Good luck. icon_smile.gif

BlakesCakes Posted 13 Jul 2010 , 3:33am
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by katnmouse

Do not eliminate the Crisco. You won't be able to get the candy thin enough consistency to dip them without the Crisco...unless you overheat the candy then you have the same problem you have now. I know because I have done the same thing you did with the same results. Melt your candy in 30 second increments to start with and stir each time the timer beeps. When melting starts then stop it every 15 seconds or so and stir until it appears that the candy is melted small lumps of solid candy may still be present but you will stir them until they melt into the mix. Now is when you stir in 1-2 Tbsp of Crisco until the candy is sufficiently liquid for dipping. The heat from the melted candy is all you need to melt the Crisco. The Crisco helps "temper" the candy to a lower temp. Good luck. icon_smile.gif




I'm sorry, but whole heartedly disagree with that advice thumbsdown.gif Crisco is NOT the only solution and it WILL result in softer and less shiny products. If that's not what someone want to produce, then paramount crystals are the best option.

With fresh candy melts, you CAN often get them to melt properly without adding anything. I do it all the time.

It's often after the melts age that they require additional "oil". It's the type of oil that makes a big difference in the quality of product that you get after the chocolate sets.

Rae

katnmouse Posted 13 Jul 2010 , 7:28pm
post #9 of 9

Sorry for implying that Crisco was the ONLY answer...and I'm not trying to dis Paramount - I don't even know what it is. icon_rolleyes.gif And the PP did not say that she wanted a hard shell on her cake balls....just a coating that did not have the white filmy look. So I just made an assumption that the PP (like myself) was using items that are easily accesible in the grocery/hobby store for her cakeballs. To me Crisco is on hand and works well and would be better than using nothing...I have yet to come across super fresh candy melts that can melt smooth and thin enough on their own. So my experience is one sided I suppose. icon_redface.gif

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