Oh Wow!

Decorating By Freddie9125 Updated 13 Jul 2010 , 4:25am by mamawrobin

Freddie9125 Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 7:37pm
post #1 of 10

no one has said that you needed to be "strong as bull" to knead the fondant LOL.

So, I got my bottom layer covered in fondant. Not to shabby considering I don't have the right tools for smoothing the fondant out and this is my first crack at this.

My questions for the day is:
1)how do I store this cake in fondant until Saturday? Let me guess, I started too soon? Perhaps I should wait to do the top layer?
2) when will be the best time to start adding the decorative icing - can this be frozen?
3) I had a little problem putting on crumb coat in one area of the cake. Like the icing wouldn't stick to the cake. Could my cake have been too cold - I did have it in the freezer, but it was out in room temp for about 30 minutes.

Thanx a bunch

BTW, I didn't find Duff's fondant oily

9 replies
CWR41 Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 9:24pm
post #2 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Freddie9125

1)how do I store this cake in fondant until Saturday? Let me guess, I started too soon? Perhaps I should wait to do the top layer?



Yes, you started too soon, and yes, you should wait to do the top "tier". I can't tell you how to store this cake that you don't need for 6 days (I don't freeze/refrigerate finished cakes), but since you've started it so early anyway, perhaps you should continue and finish it up and then freeze the entire thing until you need it and take your chances with condensation problems.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Freddie9125

3) I had a little problem putting on crumb coat in one area of the cake. Like the icing wouldn't stick to the cake. Could my cake have been too cold - I did have it in the freezer, but it was out in room temp for about 30 minutes.



Depending on how large the tier was, it probably wasn't still frozen. If the icing wouldn't stick, you're icing was too dry or stiff. (if the icing was slip sliding around and wouldn't stick, then you'd know it was because the cake was still frozen or trying to thaw and you were dealing with ice crystals, or a wet gooey mess.) I hope this helps.

Freddie9125 Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 9:50pm
post #3 of 10

Thanks CWR, what do you expect from a newbie, oh well. In regards of condensation problems, would I expect water droplets on the fondant while it thaws out?

When do you suggest I do the piped icing on?

soph917 Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 10:20pm
post #4 of 10

I usually take 3 days to do a cake.
I may bake the cake layers on a Sunday or Monday for the following weekend, wrap in plastic and foil and freeze.
Thaw, torte, assemble and crumb coat on Wednesday.
Cover with fondant on Thursday.
Complete on Friday.
That's for a Saturday cake.

Of course it depends on how much decor is involved. And if it's not a fondant cake I do it all in one day.

thatslifeca Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 10:37pm
post #5 of 10

I have a thing for schedules, so this is how I do it:
Wedding cake needed for Friday
Monday........bake my cakes, cool, swran crap and leave on counter
Tuesday.......Tort, fill, crump coat and throw into frig
Wednesday.....prepare and for Thursday (make sure I have all the fondant I need ready, decorations etc.)
Thursday......cover cakes in fondant and decorate.
Friday......deliver cake.
I don't like to freeze cakes, that's my personal choice. Some people like to do that if they have a lot of cakes going out. I don't do that many so this schedule works for me. Find your own pace, and time yourself. That way what you love to do won't become a nightmare. LOL

thatslifeca Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 10:38pm
post #6 of 10

icon_surprised.gificon_eek.gif OMG thats suppose to say swran wrap. I'm sorry, how rude of me. My apologies.

emiyeric Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 10:40pm
post #7 of 10

Rather than freezing, I would MUCH rather store my fondant-covered cake in a cardboard box (make sure it's covered so that the condensation that will occur happens on the box and not on the cake) in the fridge. Having covered cakes in fondant when they were not completely thawed, I have nothing but BAD anecdotal evidence against chancing it with frozen/thawing fondant. It get's HORRENDOUSLY sticky and misshapen, not to mention the air bubbles that will occur. No ... as long as the cake is already done and you have no options but to use this tier (as opposed to rebaking/redecorating), I would definitely prefer to refrigerate than to freeze. HTH!

emiyeric Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 10:41pm
post #8 of 10

And, for the record, my schedule when I'm planning on making is a cake is very similar to soph917's!

Freddie9125 Posted 13 Jul 2010 , 4:05am
post #9 of 10

Kind of figured I started too soon, but with working and doc's appointments, cleaning the house and simply getting ready for Saturday (our 25th) today (Monday) seemed to be the right day.

I guess it doesn't have to be eatable, I'll take it out of the freezer and just let thaw.

Thank-you everyone for your input

mamawrobin Posted 13 Jul 2010 , 4:25am
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Freddie9125

Kind of figured I started too soon, but with working and doc's appointments, cleaning the house and simply getting ready for Saturday (our 25th) today (Monday) seemed to be the right day.

I guess it doesn't have to be eatable, I'll take it out of the freezer and just let thaw.

Thank-you everyone for your input




I would re bake and start over. I would not freeze and I would not refrigerate and expect this cake to be ok for a Saturday cake. A cake is at it's best the first 3 days. IF it were for a PAYING customer (which I assume that it isn't) I wouldn't consider not re baking.

I would bake no earlier than Wednesday for a Saturday cake and that would be Wednesday evening unless I were going to freeze the cake until I was ready to fill and crumbcoat.

I NEVER refrigerate a cake. EVER.

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