How Do I

Baking By summersusu Updated 9 Aug 2010 , 7:20pm by MikeRowesHunny

summersusu Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 7:00pm
post #1 of 18

How do you do the little cakes wrapped in fondant? Are they cupcakes...they look like the size of cupcakes but thay are the same shape all the way down like a cylinder wrapped in fondant.

17 replies
awatterson Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 7:03pm
post #2 of 18

Are you talking about petit fours? There is a tutorial on here on how to make it. Just do a search on petit fours.

summersusu Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 7:17pm
post #3 of 18

Is this a petite four?
LL

matthewkyrankelly Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 7:31pm
post #4 of 18

I think I saw this on another thread.

I would bake, torte, and fill a sheetcake and cut individual cakes with a ring(or can with top and bottom removed). Then chill, crumbcoat, and fondant.

tomswife Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 7:32pm
post #5 of 18

If I were doing these, I would be using pound cake or a dense cake and cutting 2 or 3 with a round cookie or biscuit cutter, icing in between, icing all over and then covering with fondant. Those are definitely not petits fours. Hope that helps

awatterson Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 7:55pm
post #6 of 18

The little ones do look like petit fours. They do make a pourable fondant that you can use on them.

JaeRodriguez Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 8:07pm
post #7 of 18

These are bigger than petit fours, I would bake the sheet cake and cut rounds out of it like Matt said. That would give you a nice tall even look to your "cupcake"

kakeladi Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 8:15pm
post #8 of 18

Basically a petit four is "one bite" and only about 1" to 1&1/2" sq.
Many people do refer to what you pictured as a petit four but it really isn't.

Do as has been suggested: bake a sheet cake and cut out rounds. Stack as many as you want for heigth, then ice w/buttercreeam before adding fondant.

awatterson Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 8:32pm
post #9 of 18

Thanks for the correction!

summersusu Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 11:30pm
post #10 of 18

yikes, sounds like more trouble than I want, thanks again for all your help!

Kiddiekakes Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 11:36pm
post #11 of 18

These cakes pictured are called mini cakes and are a huge PIA to do...They looks cute and all but take 3 times as much work than a regular cake.Many decoraters charge anywhere from $7.00-$20.00 each for these depending on the area of the counrty and the Cake Company.

Ballymena Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 11:49pm
post #12 of 18

Can't remember where I saw them but there are cake pans available that are sectioned into small cakes. They come in a lot of shapes but if I remember right they are $80-$90 each.

carlee521 Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 4:14am
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ballymena

Can't remember where I saw them but there are cake pans available that are sectioned into small cakes. They come in a lot of shapes but if I remember right they are $80-$90 each.




They are from global sugar art:

http://www.globalsugarart.com/search.php?search=mini+cake&searchimage.x=0&searchimage.y=0

I thought they were awesome when I saw them on CC's front page...wish I had the $$$

cutthecake Posted 26 Jul 2010 , 4:48am
post #14 of 18

A Wilton yearbook from a few years ago had them pictured too.

summersusu Posted 27 Jul 2010 , 10:36pm
post #15 of 18

So would you use poured fondant or regular fondant?

summersusu Posted 9 Aug 2010 , 7:11pm
post #16 of 18

I had another question about this....how do you adhere satin ribbon to fondant like the bottom of this pic above?

iwantalicakes Posted 9 Aug 2010 , 7:20pm
post #17 of 18

You could probably use both, I would use regular fondant. I use MMF.

MikeRowesHunny Posted 9 Aug 2010 , 7:20pm
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by summersusu

I had another question about this....how do you adhere satin ribbon to fondant like the bottom of this pic above?




Personally, I secure them in the back of the cake with sterilised stainless steel dressmaking pins that have a pearl head (for easy visibility).

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