Fondant And Humidity

Decorating By duriancheesecake Updated 15 Jul 2010 , 2:48am by ambercscott87

duriancheesecake Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 3:35pm
post #1 of 21

Hello all!

I had some grief over fondant recently. I yielded different results on different occassions when making fondant figurines. I tested several brands/batches and found them to behave differently. Came up with 2 conclusions.

1. the brand may have different compositions that determine how well they hold their shape (i.e. the little doggie figurine became more 'stout' after the head was attached, while another stood up relatively well).

2. humidity. Enough said. (I can hear a resounding 'Duh'!)

Can any expert voice out there confirm this? You may tell me that the solution to problem number 1 is to find a brand that works for me, but how do I control problem number 2? I live in a high humidity area, so it's pretty hard to avoid. Anything I can add to the fondant to make it behave better? Any other tips appreciated. I don't want to tell people "Cake next Wednesday? Sure, if the weather is good Monday and Tuesday".

Thanks lots.

20 replies
JaeRodriguez Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 5:57pm
post #2 of 21

I use 50/50 Wilton fondant and gumpaste, a lot easier and faster drying then just fondant! I know people add tylose to their fondant as well.

mamawrobin Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 6:17pm
post #3 of 21

I also use 50/50 gumpaste/fondant or just straight fondant. Adding tylose doesn't always work for me. I think it's a humidity issue. I made a bow for my niece's birthday cake and after 5 days it still wasn't dry. So...I always use gumpaste now because IT always works.

JaeRodriguez Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 6:34pm
post #4 of 21

It does always work! Which is why I haven't tried tylose! Btw OP- Wilton makes premade gumpaste you can buy it at Michaels, AC Moore, etc. I just use this and haven't had a problem with it!

Ruth0209 Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 7:06pm
post #5 of 21

I always use gumpaste. Fondant isn't really intended to dry hard and solid. As Jae noted, Michael's has Wilton gumpaste that works like a charm for me, although I buy the powdered version and mix it when I need it.

Also, if you make your gumpaste pieces in stages and let the bottom parts dry first, then it won't squish down when you add the head. Stick a toothpick into the first part when it's still soft so you have something to stick the head on to when it's ready to be added. I have some Harleys with riders in my pictures that had to be dried in literally five stages in order to work.

olgalopez Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 7:16pm
post #6 of 21

.good afternoon last week I saw this same problem with other people in the forum have not been able to work while the fondant with damp.
first humid climates can not be used to carry glycerin fondant that's what it is to stand much softer, as the glycerin gives moisture to the fondant, second when you stretch the fondant using a silicone mat and do not use fat stretch would be good only with the cornstarch absorbs moisture and lets the fondant easier to handle. although the fondant in your recipe carry the added fat but stretch it with cornstarch
I give this advice because I live in a city that moisture is seasonal and I have had to accommodate my fondant recipe and gump to this climate.
for working pastillaje Gump or use the loge Nicholas you used to wet or dry climates when I make my flowers with this paste with cornflour the same stretch.
I leave you here a recipe for you to try and others also hope that you will find it much help that has helped me a lot especially for those days with so much rain
This recipe is for humid climates and is good for flowers and also dolls
modeling paste
25 ml (5 t) cold water
10 ml (2 t) gelatine
15 ml (1 T) white vegetable fat (15 grams)
Sifted icing sugar 400g
Ml 25 (5 tonnes) or CMC gum tragacanth
1 egg white

In a bowl place the sugar and the cmc that we heat in double boiler for 10 minutes, while in another bowl place the cold water and sprinkle gelatin, dissolve in double boiler. when dissolved put it in the blender and started to beat adding powdered sugar one cup at this point add half the whipped egg whites continue mixing the dough. and continue adding the sugar gradually until completing the 400 grams to 375 grams Sometimes I add sugar and let dough rest but it is appropriate to add all 400 grams when we either take it out mixing the frosting with a spatula and store in a tightly sealed container and store it in the refrigerator for 12 hours.
the next day we got it out we let it come to room temperature and begin kneading by placing the fat in your hands if you just add the 375 grams of sugar when you love have to add the rest of the recipe is correct.

JaeRodriguez Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 7:26pm
post #7 of 21

Ruth made a very good point! I started my animal figures for my son's cake a whole month in advance, because I had to make sure the bottom pieces were firmly dry before I put on the top pieces. I have a picture of my first fondant figures in my photos, needless to say, I had NO idea you had to let the pieces dry! icon_razz.gif Those guys didn't make it! ;]

mamawrobin Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 7:53pm
post #8 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaeRodriguez

Ruth made a very good point! I started my animal figures for my son's cake a whole month in advance, because I had to make sure the bottom pieces were firmly dry before I put on the top pieces. I have a picture of my first fondant figures in my photos, needless to say, I had NO idea you had to let the pieces dry! icon_razz.gif Those guys didn't make it! ;]




I've made figures only once (my Mario cake) and I used gumpaste ONLY. I only uses the 50/50 mix if I'm making a bow or something.

Ruth0209 Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 9:47pm
post #9 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamawrobin

Quote:
Originally Posted by JaeRodriguez

Ruth made a very good point! I started my animal figures for my son's cake a whole month in advance, because I had to make sure the bottom pieces were firmly dry before I put on the top pieces. I have a picture of my first fondant figures in my photos, needless to say, I had NO idea you had to let the pieces dry! icon_razz.gif Those guys didn't make it! ;]



I've made figures only once (my Mario cake) and I used gumpaste ONLY. I only uses the 50/50 mix if I'm making a bow or something.




Yes, with bows it's nice to have it be a bit stiffer but still be able to mold them to the curve of the cake and cut them when it's time.

superstar Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 10:49pm
post #10 of 21

I don't use gumpaste at all. I mix fondant (preferably Satin Ice) with tylose, cream of tartar & egg white. It dries as hard as a rock. We don't have the worst humidity in the world but it can get pretty bad if we have too much rain. Remember if you are making figures to let the body dry before making & placing the head. Dampness & humidity are not sugar friends at all but I have learned to deal with it.

duriancheesecake Posted 13 Jul 2010 , 1:51pm
post #11 of 21

Thanks for all your responses, and I will take them to heart. On one of the experiments, I added tylose to the fondant and it held up better. Still, it's soft and has a wet 'shine' on the surface, but at least it did not melt into oblivion.

Superstar, can I ask what amounts of tylose, cream of tartar and egg white you use to the fondant. I'd like to give it a shot.

Olgalopez, thanks for your recipe. Can you please confirm the amount of CMC? How many tsp/tbsp?

I think I'm just going to have to find the best recipe so that the fondant handles well in humidity, with minimal 'shine'. And assemble as close to the delivery time as possible.

Thanks.

superstar Posted 13 Jul 2010 , 10:05pm
post #12 of 21

1 lb. fondant
1 teaspoon tylose
2 teaspoons cream of tartar
1/3 teaspoon egg white
crisco
spread a small amount of crisco on work mat/board

Knead fondant till nice & soft
sprinkle tylose onto board & knead well.
Make small well in fondant & add egg white. Knead in well
add a little more crisco if it is a bit sticky
sprinkle cream of tartar on board & knead into fondant very well. Wrap in cling wrap & store in an airtight container overnight. This will keep for weeks.
This recipe came from Fran in Australia & I find it amazing.I got it from Louise's websike (Cake Journal)

duriancheesecake Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 11:08am
post #13 of 21

Thanks for sharing superstar!

sheilabelle Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 11:36am
post #14 of 21

Superstar - Is the eggwhite in powder form or is it hydrated?

superstar Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 6:47pm
post #15 of 21

It is real egg white for decorations not meant to be eaten. You can use the egg whites by eggbeaters if you are concerned. I only use this recipe for items that are not going to be eaten as they really have a sour taste from the cream of tartar. If making items that will be eaten I just do the fondant & tylose & flavor it. It holds up very well.

LindaF144a Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 10:11pm
post #16 of 21

Is there any reason why you can't leave it out?
and is that right 1/3 teaspoon of egg white, that is not much, rather miniscule compared to the amount of cream of tartar. Maybe it is 1/3 cup. I don't even know how to measure 1/3 teaspoon. icon_wink.gif

superstar Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 10:29pm
post #17 of 21

Linda it is definitely 1/3 teaspoon. Jennifer Dontz also uses this recipe & she might have an answer , I just follow the recipe & it works for me but as I say I only use this for decorations that will not be eaten. You do get measuring spoons for 1/3 tspns it is just a tad more than a 1/4.

LindaF144a Posted 15 Jul 2010 , 12:40am
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by superstar

Linda it is definitely 1/3 teaspoon. Jennifer Dontz also uses this recipe & she might have an answer , I just follow the recipe & it works for me but as I say I only use this for decorations that will not be eaten. You do get measuring spoons for 1/3 tspns it is just a tad more than a 1/4.


Superstar - Thanks. I'll have to look for that. I suppose that if I use a 1/2 tsp and then just take a little out it would be close enough. It doesn't have to be dead on, does it?

And what about the cream of tartar, can you leave it out. Not that I would eat a gumpaste flower anyways, nor suggest it to anybody else. I was just curious.
Thanks for your help.

superstar Posted 15 Jul 2010 , 12:47am
post #19 of 21

The cream of tartar is a vital part but as I have said, fondant & tylose work very well for figures that someone might want to eat....I know kids love eating the decorations. For making flowers the cream of tartar is I think important as the paste can be rolled really thin & is quite tough.

LindaF144a Posted 15 Jul 2010 , 2:00am
post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by superstar

The cream of tartar is a vital part but as I have said, fondant & tylose work very well for figures that someone might want to eat....I know kids love eating the decorations. For making flowers the cream of tartar is I think important as the paste can be rolled really thin & is quite tough.


Thanks, good to know.

ambercscott87 Posted 15 Jul 2010 , 2:48am
post #21 of 21

I live in Florida... one word.... HOT HOT HOT and all humidity.... when I do figures I use 100% gumpaste and it still NEVER dries. Guess it's just summer that will give me trouble or either i'll have to make things a year ahead of time =p

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