Something We Can All Agree With!

Business By lulus Updated 13 Jul 2010 , 4:14am by kansaslaura

lulus Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 1:54am
post #1 of 19

I found this article online - feel like I should enlarge it and post it in my bridal consultation area!

How much should I spend on a wedding cake?
Wedding Cake Price Guide
As of February of 2010, these were the prices we found around the country from well-established bakeries:

California: 9 - 12 dollars a serving. (250 guests = average $3000.00)
New York and Eastern seaboard: 12 - 30 dollars a serving. (250 guests = average $3800.00)
Midwest: 6 - 12 dollars a serving. (250 guests = average $2100.00)
Most of the incredibly intricate and artistic cakes you see in wedding magazines range from 12-15 dollars a serving (find the price in the fine print at the bottom of the page). This will make a cake for 150 people cost about $2000.00. Does this sound expensive? Just think: In the grand scheme of things, the cake is the least expensive thing at your reception. It only costs a few hundred dollars more to do the best cake, whereas the best gown or the best flowers or the best catering will cost thousands of dollars more. So if you're on a budget, the first thing to consider spending a little more on is the cake. Every wedding guest looks forward to the cake. Taste and smell are the strongest memories. Long after your centerpieces and everything else is forgotten, your guests will remember the cake!

18 replies
jenmat Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 2:09am
post #2 of 19

Nice. Let's get a couple MILLION flyers printed off and pass it out at the bridal shows. Oh, and we can also do IndyDebi's "yes, there is a difference" poster too!

WendyVA Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 2:12am
post #3 of 19

Where is the "Like" button. icon_smile.gif

DerrellC Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 2:35am
post #4 of 19

Hi Lusus, what web site did you find this on ? I think if in a bridal magazine,or bridal web site, I think printing it with their header or logo may carry more weight or validity than just printing it on it's own.

cheatize Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 3:03am
post #5 of 19

I think I got this link from a previous post on here. You can look up the average prices of all sorts of wedding stuff from any zip code you wish:
http://www.costofwedding.com/

It's a good link to give your potential clients so they can look for themselves.

thecookieladycc Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 5:51am
post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by WendyVA

Where is the "Like" button. icon_smile.gif




no kidding! thumbs_up.gif

indydebi Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 12:08pm
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheatize

I think I got this link from a previous post on here. You can look up the average prices of all sorts of wedding stuff from any zip code you wish:
http://www.costofwedding.com/

It's a good link to give your potential clients so they can look for themselves.


This site is a good starting point but as I posted on Wedding Wire, it is sorely lacking in REAL information.

First it deals in averages, which I am not particularly fond of. If you have 4 cakes at $100 and one cake at $1000, the 'average' price paid is $280, which is nowhere CLOSE to either price. The median price is $100. I prefer to deal with median prices.

4 weddings that cost $5000 and one wedding that costs $100,000 will render an "average" of $24,000. Again ..... nowhere close to the median (most common) cost of $5000 and WAY short of the $100K.

Second, It shows the average price PAID for a wedding cake. This includes giving Aunt Sally fifty bucks to cover ingredients to the $500 paid to the expensive bakery for the very same cake. The average cost of $280 is very unrealistic because most brides don't have an Aunt Sally in the mix.

It also doesn't tell you if the $400 cake is for 500 people or for 50 people.

It's strictly a collection of averages but has no REAL information. It has just enough info to educate people in a bad way.

costumeczar Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 1:54pm
post #9 of 19

Maybe averages don't tell the whole story, but I'll happily take the average price of $12-30 for the Eastern Seaboard that they're listing. If people would pay me that I'd do one cake a week and get more sleep!!

indydebi Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 1:57pm
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

Maybe averages don't tell the whole story, but I'll happily take the average price of $12-30 for the Eastern Seaboard that they're listing. If people would pay me that I'd do one cake a week and get more sleep!!


icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif Amen, sista!!!

snarkybaker Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 3:14pm
post #11 of 19

I guess the point that is missing is that the very first sentence says " well-established bakeries" and so they are talking about Buddy Valestro , not home bakers. In fact, I would say that the price in the northeast is probably higher because most states from Maryland through New York don't allow home baking thus making the market possible for artisan bakeries. If you take a look in the South with it's hot and cold running cake ladies, you'll see a much lower average price, in fact, they don't even bother to mention an average price in the South...hmmm?

costumeczar Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 3:23pm
post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by snarkybaker

I guess the point that is missing is that the very first sentence says " well-established bakeries" and so they are talking about Buddy Valestro , not home bakers. In fact, I would say that the price in the northeast is probably higher because most states from Maryland through New York don't allow home baking thus making the market possible for artisan bakeries. If you take a look in the South with it's hot and cold running cake ladies, you'll see a much lower average price, in fact, they don't even bother to mention an average price in the South...hmmm?




Innnnteresting....

indydebi Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 3:27pm
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

Maybe averages don't tell the whole story, but I'll happily take the average price of $12-30 for the Eastern Seaboard that they're listing. If people would pay me that I'd do one cake a week and get more sleep!!


Oh just to clarify ..... my above post is referring to the www.costofweddings.com, not to the article referenced by the original poster.

FullHouse Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 8:18pm
post #14 of 19

WOW, I just clicked on the article "Hows to shop for and select your wedding cake" from that site, there is SO much misinformation there I was getting very aggravated just reading it. The fact that the title is "HowS to shop for..." rather than "How to..." just goes to show how wrong they are icon_smile.gif.

Especially love the part that compares cutting fondant to cutting chewing gum icon_confused.gif and the taste of fondant to cardboard; also love the warning that baking a cake days before the wedding and freezing it will result in a poor tasting cake.

Doug Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 9:19pm
post #15 of 19

noticed one big piece of bad advice.

site rants about NO FROZEN cakes.

then says that they are ok if stored in refrigerator -- but NEVER below 44 degrees.

WRONG! ! ! !

proper food storage (see ServSafe) requires cold foods to be held BELOW 40 degrees (range of 33-40) -- frozen is to be at zero or below.

So, site is encouraging people to eat unsafe cake!!!

------------

ALSO

did you see that they site has a link to Leah_s !?!?!

on the very bottom of the how to shop page.

FullHouse Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 9:44pm
post #16 of 19

Scary. The average bride may not know any better and believe what she reads on this page. So frustrating.

I hadn't noticed the link to Leah_S' bakery. Wonder if the bakeries listed there would prefer not to be associated with all of this incorrect information. They do say good things about these cakers, but still.... Leah_S, are you seeing this????

Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug

noticed one big piece of bad advice.

site rants about NO FROZEN cakes.

then says that they are ok if stored in refrigerator -- but NEVER below 44 degrees.

WRONG! ! ! !

proper food storage (see ServSafe) requires cold foods to be held BELOW 40 degrees (range of 33-40) -- frozen is to be at zero or below.

So, site is encouraging people to eat unsafe cake!!!

------------

ALSO

did you see that they site has a link to Leah_s !?!?!

on the very bottom of the how to shop page.


kansaslaura Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 10:01pm
post #17 of 19

It is not unsafe to store a cake at 44 degrees anymore that it is unsafe to have it sitting outside at 80 degrees.

Doug Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 10:07pm
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by kansaslaura

It is not unsafe to store a cake at 44 degrees anymore that it is unsafe to have it sitting outside at 80 degrees.




depends upon the filling.

refrigerated anything, including fillings needing refrigeration, according to ServSafe & FDA requirements, are to be kept BELOW 40 degrees.

when health department checks temp in fridge -- they are checking to see it is no warmer than 40 degrees. NOT 44 or 43 or 42 or 41 -- but 40 or down to just above freezing.

knowing that is a part of getting health dept. certification as well as ServSafe certification (look for the certificates next time you are in a restaurant)

kansaslaura Posted 13 Jul 2010 , 4:14am
post #19 of 19

I've been licensed twice for two different restaurants and currently hold a vaild license in the state of KS-- Inspected numerous times and never once failed or gotten a 'ding' for improper storage of foods. I do know the rules.

Nearly every cake, and most fillings are stable at room temperature. If that were not the case how could any of the chain bakeries have stacks of cakes of all types out for you to simply pick from a display? Why the author of that piece chose 44 degrees is beyond me. Maybe it's a temp he/she finds most beneficial to the fondant/glaze/whatever. Maybe it was a typo...

If cakes were not stable enough to be held at room temp for long periods of time there would be lines around the block at the ER every weekend from food poisoning due to wedding cakes.

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