Duffs Fondant

Decorating By attackofthecakes Updated 15 Oct 2011 , 12:13am by BlakesCakes

attackofthecakes Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 3:19am
post #1 of 38

Has anyone used duffs fondant??...i tried to use his chocolate flavored one today and it was useless. it was really soft and crumbly..not sure if i did something wrong but it was not a good experience...and very $$$$$$$

37 replies
hollys_hobby Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 3:32am
post #2 of 38

I have used the red and white when I was in a pinch. Thankfully I did have a 50% off coupon both times!!
Both of them were rock hard to start, but once softened, they were very workable and covered really nice! Tasted pretty good too! I am still a huge MMF fan, but will use Duff in a pinch over Wilton any day!!

catlharper Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 5:53am
post #3 of 38

I have the black for the first time and found it very easy to work with. I'm making a rolled cake topper with it and I mixed in tylose and it's drying up very nicely. Seemed easy enough to work with. I'll be covering spacers with it this upcoming week...something tells me I'll want to add a little PS to it to firm it up a bit...seems a bit thin. Also, if it were not for the coupon I wouldn't get it either...but pure black is hard to make so the 10 bucks is worth it.

Cat

attackofthecakes Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 3:23pm
post #4 of 38

hmm..i dont know maybe i heated it too much in the microwave..but those michaels 50% coupons are the best...i agree im not thrilled with wilton but its just so available..maybe ill try agin and add some ps to it..i havent tried making my own mmf yet but i may soon...im sure youll be hearing from me when i do

catlharper Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 5:03pm
post #5 of 38

don't know if it was just the black but I didn't need to microwave it at all to use...it was soft in the bucket. I'm thinking it will be TOO soft for covering the dummies I need to cover so I will probably need PS to firm it up a bit. But I think it will work out well for the rolled curlie ques I'm making for the sides. But seriously...10 bucks a pound? Nope...too much.

Barb00 Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 5:04pm
post #6 of 38

I just used his black this morning. Was very soft. I need decorations for next Saturday so I hope they dry firmly. Bought it at Michael's with the 50% off coupon because I knew I probably could not get the black-black I wanted doing it myself.

catlharper Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 5:16pm
post #7 of 38

If you are drying decorations you will need to add tylose or gumpaste to make it dry in time!

Momma_D Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 5:19pm
post #8 of 38

I've used the white. It's pretty soft, but workable. It tints easily, too and tastes great. I don't think it's worth the price, but a far cry better than Wilton. I prefer Satin Ice, myself, but when in a pinch, I'm going with Duff.

retaunton Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 5:22pm
post #9 of 38

Duff's fondant is made by Satin Ice.

Momma_D Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 5:28pm
post #10 of 38

I know, but Satin Ice is not as soft as Duff's and the flavor is not the same.

Barb00 Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 5:33pm
post #11 of 38

Uh oh, Cat. I made fondant balls and just a large, flat 5 piece tiger paw print with flat tiger stripes. The tiger paw print will be on the top, so I am not too worried about it drying firm, but hopefully the tiger stripes I plan to put on the sides won't sag. I did not add tylose. Think for this purpose they might dry enough so as not to loose their shape? I have not used this fondant before.

cblupe Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 5:34pm
post #12 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by retaunton

Duff's fondant is made by .




How do you know it is made by Satin Ice? There was another thread that said it was by Fondex. I can't bring myself to spend that much money on it yet. Homemade is really cost effective.

catlharper Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 5:36pm
post #13 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barb00

Uh oh, Cat. I made fondant balls and just a large, flat 5 piece tiger paw print with flat tiger stripes. The tiger paw print will be on the top, so I am not too worried about it drying firm, but hopefully the tiger stripes I plan to put on the sides won't sag. I did not add tylose. Think for this purpose they might dry enough so as not to loose their shape? I have not used this fondant before.




If they are flat decorations just make sure you moisten with water or gumglue at all points and you won't have any problems. You really only need to use tylose when the figures stand up or out from the cake. I'm making a fondant/tylose cake topper so I need it to stand up on the cake. But your stripes will do just fine on the sides.

Cat

VickiChicki Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 5:37pm
post #14 of 38

Actually Duff's fondant is FONDARIFIC and is made in Savannah, Ga. I order directly from them wholesale. I order the "Wedding White" which is still not a true "white, white", but I cut it 50/50 with Satin Ice and I have been estatic and THRILLED with the results. And to me, it tastes GREAT!
you can go to www.fondarific.com I believe. They have lots of flavors and colors and I did confirm with them that it is their's that has Duff's name on it. I have used the black and red and was very happy with results.

cakeflake80 Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 5:44pm
post #15 of 38

I love the Duff fondant, but agree that it's too soft for decorations that need to dry hard. I did a Hannah Montana cake last week and the bottom tier was zebra print. I used the Duff for the stripes and then I used Wilton black for the starts on wires and music notes that needed to stand up. The Duff is way better tasting than Wilton and so much easier to work with....but it's useless if you need something to dry hard.

retaunton Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 5:47pm
post #16 of 38

I have a friend that has a cake decorating supply shop that sells it and it says on the label that it is made by Satin Ice.

Suzisweet Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 5:47pm
post #17 of 38

I actually think that Duffs Fondant is made by Fondarific. I too bought it because of the coupon (plus I wanted to taste the buttercream flavor which I thought was ok)
PLEASE BEWARE that if you make decorations that need to dry, it is not an easy thing to do! I made bow loops over a week ago and accidentally forgot tylose...they never dried! They were so soft (even in air conditioned home) that I was able to ball it back up and knead back to softness, put tylose in it and start over. The loops are drying again (2 days now) and even after using a generous amount of tylose. They are still soft. After speaking to another cake decorating friend, she too had this problem and said no way will she use this for anything besides covering cakes.
I always buy black and red and for those colors I use Satin Ice. I have made things with very little tylose mixed in and things dry over night. When using white or making any other colors I use Fondex, again I add tylose and over night decorations are dry.
Nothing against the Duff stuff as it has its purpose...covering a cake thinly and nicely while being edible as well as never having cracks and dryness.
For that I give it a thumbs up as for the decorations though...it is a no go in my book.
Curious to see if others continue to have this issue with it.
Suzi

ginger6361 Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 6:13pm
post #18 of 38

yes, I agree... it was useless!!! too soft for anything!!! and what a waste of $19!!!!

catlharper Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 6:16pm
post #19 of 38

hmmm...I added about a tbs of tylose to 1/2 cup of the black and the decorations are hard as a rock today...about 36 hours since I formed them. Now I wonder if I just go lucky?

mfruchey Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 6:23pm
post #20 of 38

I just used the pink Duff fondant to cover my DD's cake and LOVED it. I did not attempt to use it for any of the decorations, as I heard it was too soft for that, but for covering the cake, it was a dream. I usually stick with Satin Ice, but it's not been so great lately. The pink shade was a hot mess in the container, but once it "dried" it deepened to a really nice shade--got lots of compliments on the color. I do prefer the taste of the Satin Ice (to me, it tastes like Lucky Charms marshmallows while the Duff tastes like candy corn), but the coverage was so much better with the Duff that I will absolutely use it in the future (with a Michael's coupon, of course).

Suzisweet Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 6:42pm
post #21 of 38

Just found this posted some where else on CC......It is saying that the "whole sale" items are made by Satin Ice hence your friends bakery...
Michaels Duff products...Fondarific. Why they would market this way is beyond me but here is what it said...

"There have been a few other posts on this topic. The wholesale Duff product is manufactured by Satin Ice. The retail Duff product (the one sold at Michael's) is made by Fondarific. A rep from Fondarific posted on one of the other threads and confirmed this."

I am not trying to start a war, just trying to make clear that what is in that bucket marked Duff (at Michaels) is not in any way, shape or form Satin Ice. People need to know that so that they do not make the exspensive mistake of going to Michaels thinking that is what they are buying and then being very dissapointed that it does not function as Satin Ice.

cblupe Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 6:46pm
post #22 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suzisweet

Just found this posted some where else on CC......It is saying that the "whole sale" items are made by hence your friends bakery...
Michaels Duff products...Fondarific. Why they would market this way is beyond me but here is what it said...

"There have been a few other posts on this topic. The wholesale Duff product is manufactured by . The retail Duff product (the one sold at Michael's) is made by Fondarific. A rep from Fondarific posted on one of the other threads and confirmed this."

I am not trying to start a war, just trying to make clear that what is in that bucket marked Duff (at Michaels) is not in any way, shape or form . People need to know that so that they do not make the exspensive mistake of going to Michaels thinking that is what they are buying and then being very dissapointed that it does not function as .




Thank you for clarifying this for me. This is quite confusing trying to determine who makes the fondant sold at Michael's.

CupQuequito Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 7:33pm
post #23 of 38

I used the chocolate fondant, this weekend. Tastes great, like a Tootsie Roll! Rolled out beautifully. I think I rolled mine out to thin, but I've only done 2 cakes with any Fondant.

It is pricey, but I have 40% coupons, galore! I will defiantly use it again, especially for black, red, and brown. Since it will take more gels to make the colors just right.

attackofthecakes Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 1:52am
post #24 of 38

ok thanks guys...i will try to use it again, can you tell me more about adding tylose?...and where do you buy satin ice?

BlakesCakes Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 1:55am
post #25 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by catlharper

hmmm...I added about a tbs of tylose to 1/2 cup of the black and the decorations are hard as a rock today...about 36 hours since I formed them. Now I wonder if I just go lucky?




Not actually lucky...........just used way more tylose (at least 3X, maybe even 5X) than you would normally need to add to fondant to get it to hold it's shape. That said, the items still could be heat sensitive because of all of the extra fat in it.............

Normal amounts would be 1 tsp. to a pound of Satin Ice or 1/2 tsp. to a pound of Wilton.

Rae

apetricek Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 2:08am
post #26 of 38

not made by satin ice first off, I have heard that it is fonderific...I have used it I agree completely USELESS!!! It is tooooo soft, and doesn't dry worth a damn. Oh, and you can't airbrush it since it has so much grease in it the airbrush coloring actually beads up. I posted this big rant about this before. All of the things I made with it were put into the garbage. I ONLY use satin ice, and it def. is not the same thing, no comparison really. I also didn't think it tasted all that great, I think it is over-hyped because of the label attached to it. My question is that why does he only have satin ice buckets on the show if this stuff is SOOO great???? I did have the coupon which I used and only bought black to see what the rave was about. NOT impressed. My only suggestion for it would be for newbies to use it to cover cakes till they get the hang of fondant, as it is tooo soft. Thanks but no thanks Duff...

Q-Squared Posted 18 Jul 2010 , 8:16pm
post #27 of 38

When I first tried Duff's I almost cried. It was my first cake disaster -- because it will NOT set up hard for decorations (which is what I was trying to do). I added a ton of tylose, and 2 days later (after laying under a fan running full speed) it was still pliable and had not set up. At that point, the only good thing I thought about it was that it tasted really good (for fondant).

But then I decided to cover a cake with it, and I have to say, it worked really well for that. Just don't try to make anything that needs to harden with it -- tylose or not.

I've tried both the white fondant and the chocolate fondant, and I think they taste great. You really have to work with it though, because straight out of the tub, it's hard. I didn't microwave mine very long. Just long enough to break a piece off. Then I just worked with it until it became softer.

My only other warning is: don't keep it too hot in your house. When I was working with it, I had it down to 72, and it was fine. Cake is done now and the leftovers are still around. I turned off the ac and it's up to 76 in here and the fondant is mush!

Very $$$ though, so use those Michael's coupons!!

aej6 Posted 18 Jul 2010 , 9:44pm
post #28 of 38

I am working on a large cake (of a face with ears) and I was planning to use Duff's black for the entire background of the face ..then I would lay on eyes, mouth, etc.

My plan was to do just the top layer in fondant..not up and down the sides of the cake, just a layer on top of black fondant.

Any thoughts on whether I should do this early and add tylose or should I leave as is and lay it on top with no tylose?

First fondant experience this large...have done small pieces but not a sheet-like layer of this.

Thoughts/ideas appreciated!

Ally

Q-Squared Posted 18 Jul 2010 , 9:59pm
post #29 of 38

If you're just laying it on top of the cake, I think it would be fine. Like I said, it covered my cake very well, it just didn't do well setting up or molding. Are you making the eyes, ears, etc. out of Duff's fondant? If so, I would consider mixing tylose with those, in case they do have to set up a little.

But if the black is just laying on the cake, no need to let it set up. I did mine over night and it was fine.

KayMc Posted 18 Jul 2010 , 10:53pm
post #30 of 38

Adding my Duff fondant experience: I made a big loopy bow from the chocolate Duff fondant. I had the loops drying on my counter for 7-8 days. By the way, I forgot to add the tylose,so it was plain Duff. The loops were still a little soft by the end of the week, but they held their shape. I made the bow with NO difficulty, and the loops held their shape perfectly. Now, the cake never left the air conditioned house, but even though they didn't feel hard to touch, they kept their form 100%.

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