Crusting Buttercream

Decorating By princesscatt Updated 10 Jul 2010 , 10:32pm by mamawrobin

princesscatt Posted 10 Jul 2010 , 11:53am
post #1 of 10

I feel like this is a stupid question but I can't get my buttercream to crust. I live on the east coast were we have been in triple digits lately so that may be a factor...what else can I add besides more powedered sugar to make it crust better?

9 replies
diabolicdesire Posted 10 Jul 2010 , 11:59am
post #2 of 10

Have you tried adding some meringue powder? I've heard that is suppose to help.

mamawrobin Posted 10 Jul 2010 , 1:32pm
post #3 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by princesscatt

I feel like this is a stupid question but I can't get my buttercream to crust. I live on the east coast were we have been in triple digits lately so that may be a factor...what else can I add besides more powedered sugar to make it crust better?




Our temperatures have been 100+ and I haven't had any trouble. What recipe are you using? Most of the time when there is a "crusting" issue the sugar to fat ratio is off. If you could share the recipe that you're using it would help to know what your problem may be.

I NEVER use meringue powder...it leaves an aftertaste...and my icing crust very well. The icing that I use crust within 5 minutes.

artscallion Posted 10 Jul 2010 , 1:53pm
post #4 of 10

I also live on the east coast. I normally don't use crusting buttercream under fondant. I use non-crusting and chill it so I have a good firm base to apply fondant to.

But since it's been so hot and humid here this week, I didn't want to do a lot of in-and-out-of the fridge. So, I've been doing a crusting recipe and no refrigeration at any point in the process.

So, back to your question. This morning, I iced my room temp cake with my own, never-fail-to-crust recipe...and after 20 minutes, no sign of crust. I moved the cake into an air conditioned room and it crusted perfectly in 5 minutes. So, I do think heat and humidity can be a factor in crusting, just like they are in gumpaste drying.

Incidentally, my recipe contains meringue powder. So, If your recipe normally crusts as it is, I don't think adding that will help you.

princesscatt Posted 10 Jul 2010 , 4:03pm
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamawrobin

Quote:
Originally Posted by princesscatt

I feel like this is a stupid question but I can't get my buttercream to crust. I live on the east coast were we have been in triple digits lately so that may be a factor...what else can I add besides more powedered sugar to make it crust better?



Our temperatures have been 100+ and I haven't had any trouble. What recipe are you using? Most of the time when there is a "crusting" issue the sugar to fat ratio is off. If you could share the recipe that you're using it would help to know what your problem may be.

I NEVER use meringue powder...it leaves an aftertaste...and my icing crust very well. The icing that I use crust within 5 minutes.




Here is my recipe
1cp butter
1cp shortening
1/2cp whipping cream or heavy cream
5cp powdered sugar
1tbls vanilla
1/2tsp creme bouquet

1234me Posted 10 Jul 2010 , 4:21pm
post #6 of 10

I live in a hot humid climate and have had no problem. I find the longer I wait for it to crust - the better. But i never wait longer than 10 minutes. The closer I smooth to the 10 minute mark, the better it looks! I sometimes get impatient and want to smooth before 10 minutes is up!

catlharper Posted 10 Jul 2010 , 4:24pm
post #7 of 10

I now use IndyDebi's recipe and never have a crusting problem...and it's over 100 in CA these days. It doesn't use merangue powder but "dream whip" instead and doesn't have that odd aftertaste.

mamawrobin Posted 10 Jul 2010 , 5:47pm
post #8 of 10

Here is my recipe
1cp butter
1cp shortening
1/2cp whipping cream or heavy cream
5cp powdered sugar
1tbls vanilla
1/2tsp creme bouquet[/quote]

Try Indydebi's recipe. The sugar/fat ratio is 2:1 and the addition of the Dream Whip makes it "humidity friendly". I promise that if you use her recipe IT WILL CRUST and it will do so within 5-10 minutes. I guarantee. Even Wilton's "humidity proof" icing calls for Dream Whip.

Also anytime that I notice a post about "crusting issues" it's with a 1:1 sugar to fat ratio with butter/shortening. Seems like the 1:1 sugar/fat ratio recipes that use shortening only are never the problem...it's always when butter is involved. icon_confused.gif Butter does have more liquid than shortening maybe that has something to do with it.

I use Indydebi's exclusively because of the heat and humidity. I've had cakes outdoors for up to 4 hours in over 100 degrees and they didn't melt or even sweat...and I have NEVER had a crusting issue with her icing. thumbs_up.gif

sweettreat101 Posted 10 Jul 2010 , 7:44pm
post #9 of 10

Try 8 cups sugar, 1/3 cup cream, 1/2 cup butter and 1 1/2 cup shortening and two tablespoons flavoring and it will crust. You can add more cream if you want a thinner consistency.

mamawrobin Posted 10 Jul 2010 , 10:32pm
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweettreat101

Try 8 cups sugar, 1/3 cup cream, 1/2 cup butter and 1 1/2 cup shortening and two tablespoons flavoring and it will crust. You can add more cream if you want a thinner consistency.




Yep. I would bet money that it will crust. thumbs_up.gif

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