Weeping Buttercream Under Fondant

Decorating By dukeswalker Updated 11 Jul 2010 , 5:22pm by catlharper

dukeswalker Posted 10 Jul 2010 , 2:43am
post #1 of 8

I have a square Rubik's cube cake sitting on my counter. It is covered in vanilla buttercream (requested by birthday girl) and then wrapped in darl chocolate/black fondant. I also made a 12" round to go under the rubik's cube, it is all buttercream.

About 30 minutes after frosting, the round's buttercream began to weep (liquid pooling around edges, etc) I immediately put that baby in the fridge - the problem is I KNOW the buttercream under the fondant of the rubik's cube MUST be getting all weepy too (and doing who knows what to the cake! blech!) but I'm afraid to put it into the fridge because of the fondant. I've cranked my a/c down....but....any ideas on how to save this?

I was thinking of peeling off the fondant, re-frosting it with vanilla and then trying out some of the Wilton or Duff brand black sprays.

7 replies
JanetBme Posted 10 Jul 2010 , 6:41am
post #2 of 8

I put fondant in the fridge all the time- it will go thru a shiny phase as it comes up to room temp, but then it dries just fine..


However, if your buttercream is weeping- it will probably get worse... toss the shortening you've been using or add cornstarch to it...or use high ratio... if it isn't the shortening, then I don't know what else would be causing it.

catlharper Posted 10 Jul 2010 , 4:40pm
post #3 of 8

Ok, a few questions...are you using a crusting buttercream? Did you ice a cold cake and then put the final coating of fondant onto a cold cake? After crumbcoating did you put the cake back into the fridge and then try to put fondant on it?

Ok, now the reasons behind this. Non crusting buttercream can sometimes be too...uh..not sure how to put this...creamy, smooth, almost runny... crusting holds it shape much better. If you ice a cold cake then the condensation of the cake coming to room temp will effect your crumbcoat and then the final coating on top of the crumbcoat will slide. You always want to be doing your final coat of buttercream or fondant on a room temp cake that's had time to settle. (about 3 hours out of the freezer, one hour out of the fridge). Crumbcoating right out of the freezer or fridge is fine but you have to let it come to room temp after crumbcoating. Lastly, if you crumbcoat and then put it into the fridge when you take it out again you still have to let it come up to room temp. If you are using a good crusting buttercream you won't have any problem with the condensation evaporating quickly.

HTH.
Cat

dukeswalker Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 2:46am
post #4 of 8

Thanks for the help guys. I did use a crusting buttercream and I didn't ice a cold/cook cake. In fact - I think it was the fact that it was about 80-82 degrees in my kitchen and it was just too hot. I ended up peeling off the fondant (which stunk because I had done a really nice job on the square/corners!), whipped up some chocolate buttercream and redid the cake with that. I just delivered the cake the afternoon and they were super thrilled. They had just come back from a trip where they visited The Cake Boss's bakery and were super psyched to see what I had done. icon_smile.gif

catlharper Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 5:55am
post #5 of 8

Cool! Glad it worked out! The only thing I could think of is that your buttercream has real butter in it? But I'm happy the client was thrilled...it's the best feeling!

dukeswalker Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 5:59am
post #6 of 8

Yup - my BC did have 50% butter, 50% shortening. I just c.a.n.t. do it without butter - but this is the risk I run, right? Here is my question though - could I have refrigerated the fondant covered Rubik's cube? I have always read/heard that you do no stick a fondant covered cake in the fridge. Is that true?

carmijok Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 6:20am
post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by dukeswalker

Yup - my BC did have 50% butter, 50% shortening. I just c.a.n.t. do it without butter - but this is the risk I run, right? Here is my question though - could I have refrigerated the fondant covered Rubik's cube? I have always read/heard that you do no stick a fondant covered cake in the fridge. Is that true?




You can if you box it and wrap the box with cling wrap. I deliver cold cakes and let them warm up slowly after delivery. Since most events let the cakes sit out for several hours I don't have a problem. Keep your cake in the box a while after taking it out of the refrigerator. The condensation is not as intense as if you take a cold fondant covered cake directly into a warm room. I use 100% butter in my BC. But then I don't completely cover with fondant, I use that for decor. I've never had a problem with it. I kept my Uncle Sam hat cake in the fridge completely decorated for 1 day and night (in a box). Came out great.

catlharper Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 5:22pm
post #8 of 8

You sure can put a fondant cake inside the fridge. I would box it up tho so that the condensation forms on the outside of the box not the cake BUT if you can't box it up, weird size/shape, then just give time for the cake to come too room temp again and the condensation will evaporate. Cat

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