What Is The Easiest Fondant To Make?(Not Concerned W/ Taste)

Decorating By grossoutqueen Updated 10 Jul 2010 , 4:36am by kricket

grossoutqueen Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 3:02am
post #1 of 28

I have made a second attempt at making Michelle Foster's fondant recipe. I am sure it is something I am doing wrong, but it is a pain in the butt to make. I have no idea how much p. sugar I actually had to add before it stopped being a goopy mess and still don't think it was right before I wrapped it up to sit for the night... Both times it was messy and didn't go well.

I am only making this fondant to use on dummies for my portfolio so taste isnt important. Is there a very easy, cheap fondant recipe that I can try that will look good, since looks are the only thing I am concerned about with these cakes?

27 replies
chellescountrycakes Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 3:54am
post #2 of 28

I love the marshmellow fondant- and its easy as pie in your stand mixer- look for a recipe that says "easy MMF in kitchen aid" or some such- it really is easy- My kids make it for me.

mamawrobin Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 4:47am
post #3 of 28

I have made literally 100's of batches of Michele Foster's fondant and I have never had any trouble with it...even before I bought my stand mixer and did it all by hand. icon_confused.gif I don't know that marshmallow fondant is any "easier" because I've made several batches and all I got was something that I couldn't even cover a cake with. icon_lol.gif I know that you're just using it on a dummy but the "workability" of the fondant would still be a factor even though the taste wouldn't be. For workability MMF sucks IMO icon_lol.gif

You said that you didn't know how much sugar to add to MFF. I usually add a total of 3 1/4 pounds of sugar. I keep adding as it's kneading in my mixer until I can stick a finger in it and none of the fondant sticks to my finger and my finger leaves and impression in the fondant. That's when to stop adding sugar. Then I liberally grease my work table with Crisco and knead it a little. It will be a little sticky so grease your hands as well....then I wrap and the next morning it's perfect. I actually had to use some the other day that was freshly made...I did have time to let it "rest" for about 4 1/2 hours and it worked great.

Maybe this batch that you've made will be "right" This is "hands down" the best fondant for workability that I've ever used. Sorry that you've had problems with it.

jjkarm Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 4:59am
post #4 of 28

If you want cheap easy and no worries about taste... I'd say definitely marshmallow fondant.

jjpow Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 5:13am
post #5 of 28

i agree with marshmallow fondant! It is easy to work with and an easy recipe. Though i have been wanting to try MF fondant!

metria Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 5:23am
post #6 of 28

try Toba Garrett's recipe w/o the flavoring:

http://cakecentral.com/recipes/2127/toba-garretts-fondant

gelatin/glucose based like MFF, but water instead of cream/butter. it's my go-to when i'm not concerned about taste.

hollyml Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 6:01am
post #7 of 28

MMF is super easy to make, but there is an experience factor when it comes to just how much shortening to coat your hands or mixer with, how much powdered sugar to add and so on -- it's probably the same with the Michele Foster. I made a huge mess the first couple of times I made MMF. icon_lol.gif But now I have the hang of it and it's not goopy or messy at all, and the fondant is just the right texture and easy to use.

The absolute easiest, when you don't care about taste, is to use Wilton's. icon_smile.gif It costs more than making your own, of course, but it's cheap compared to other brands of pre-made!

grossoutqueen Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 3:44pm
post #8 of 28

I hope this isn't a completely stupid question but what is MF? I know that MMF is marshmallow fondant but I keep seeing MF or MFF?

I know I could use some more experience with making my own. I have always bought it when I needed it but I don't want to spend the extra money just to throw it on a dummy and pull it off again. I just figured with all of the steps involved such as the gelatin and double boiler and letting it cool and such, there might be an easier recipe to make for this particular purpose. I think I will go the MMF route next time for sure! thumbs_up.gif

cattycornercakes Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 3:58pm
post #9 of 28

I think the easiest fondant to make is T's Fondant - look for it in the recipes. You basically put water, flavoring and mini marshmallows in the microwave until the marshmallows are melted. Then you mix that with the powdered sugar...which I do in my KA with the dough hook. I make this stuff in less than 10 mins and it tastes great!

cattycornercakes Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 4:03pm
post #10 of 28

I'm sure someone will correct me if I'm wrong but I believe MMF is marshmallow fondant and MFF is Michele Foster's Fondant.

JaeRodriguez Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 4:04pm
post #11 of 28

I've only tried homemade once, it was MMF and I agree with mamawrobin workability? NONE! I had to chunk it and buy Wilton. I'm sure it was a user error but if I ever tried a homemade again it would probably be MFF!

CakeMakar Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 4:09pm
post #12 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by metria

try Toba Garrett's recipe w/o the flavoring:

http://cakecentral.com/recipes/2127/toba-garretts-fondant

gelatin/glucose based like MFF, but water instead of cream/butter. it's my go-to when i'm not concerned about taste.




I agree, Toba Garrett's is a million times easier than MMF. Even my brother, who I coerce into making my fondant and give him the choice which to make chooses Toba's. I recently introduced my friend to it, and now its all she makes instead of her MMF.

ycknits Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 4:13pm
post #13 of 28

I use Edna's (Designmeacake.com) recipe for MMF. Here's the link to her recipe:

http://www.designmeacake.com/mfrec.html

I make it using my KitchenAid Pro mixer with a dough hook. I do weigh out the marshmallows to make sure I have 15 oz. I use one full 2 pound bag of CANE powdered sugar. After all of the powdered sugar is incorporated, I knead it a little by hand, form a nice "log", wrap it, bag it, let it sit overnight or for weeks. It is soft enough to work nicely, strong enough to cover anything I need to cover.

My results have been very consistent. I sometimes make three or four batches, one after the other. However, I probably would not attempt this recipe without a KA stand icon_smile.gif mixer or equivalent.

Did I mention that it tastes pretty darned good too?

kger Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 5:13pm
post #14 of 28

I've only made mmf once, but used this video for a tutorial beforehand:




I thought it turned out pretty good, but I'd never done anything with fondant before so I had nothing to compare it to. Probably will make some again very soon.

mamawrobin Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 5:19pm
post #15 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by grossoutqueen

I hope this isn't a completely stupid question but what is MF? I know that MMF is marshmallow fondant but I keep seeing MF or MFF?

I know I could use some more experience with making my own. I have always bought it when I needed it but I don't want to spend the extra money just to throw it on a dummy and pull it off again. I just figured with all of the steps involved such as the gelatin and double boiler and letting it cool and such, there might be an easier recipe to make for this particular purpose. I think I will go the MMF route next time for sure! thumbs_up.gif




MFF is Michele Foster's fondant. I certainly don't use a double boiler to make mine...I use the microwave..I use the "updated" recipe and I have NEVER had any problem with it. For workability it can't be beat and for taste...the white chocolate version is devine. thumbs_up.gif The regular taste awesome as well.....I don't find it any more complicated to make than MMF and it is a much higher quality fondant.

metria Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 5:23pm
post #16 of 28

ditto! i've had no problems using the microwave for Toba's, MFF, or MMF.

mamawrobin Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 5:28pm
post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by metria

ditto! i've had no problems using the microwave for Toba's, MFF, or MMF.




I think I'm going to try Toba's recipe for covering my dummies. It would certainly be less expensive than MFF...that stuff is so good that I really hate wasting it on dummies...LOL...

metria Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 5:28pm
post #18 of 28

IMO MMF is the easiest to make. It's less number of ingredients and tools. I've just been eyeballing the PS and even the water. I don't like working with it though. It doesn't have the pliability of one made w/ straight up gelatin.

For MFF and Toba's, it's a bit more complicated. Don't skip the part about straining the gelatin or you'll get chunky/chewy bits in your fondant.

mamawrobin Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 6:48pm
post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by metria

IMO MMF is the easiest to make. It's less number of ingredients and tools. I've just been eyeballing the PS and even the water. I don't like working with it though. It doesn't have the pliability of one made w/ straight up gelatin.

For MFF and Toba's, it's a bit more complicated. Don't skip the part about straining the gelatin or you'll get chunky/chewy bits in your fondant.




Yes you will...I didn't strain one time and that's exactly what happens...LOL...I actually let the cheese cloth slip out of my hands that I was straing the liquid in and the gelatin mixture poured into the powdered sugar without going through the cloth. Yeah..it ruined the entire batch of fondant. icon_lol.gif I'm way more careful how I do things now so that doesn't happen again.

I agree with you 100% on the pliability of "straight up gelatin" fondant. The workability of this type of fondant makes it worth the extra effort.

TexasSugar Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 6:56pm
post #20 of 28

http://ladycakes.com/toppage3.htm

The is the recipe I use for my dummies. Made alot like MFF, just has water and crisco in it. It is good to me too. I'd use it on cakes, except my family doesn't like the texture of fondant. icon_smile.gif

cattycornercakes Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 7:02pm
post #21 of 28

Gosh...I'm I the only one that uses T's Fondant recipe? icon_smile.gif

dsilvest Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 7:13pm
post #22 of 28

I use MMF if I want the finished product to be off white and my own version of Toba's recipe if I want a whiter fondant. The flavouring is left out and I use the least expensive ingredients I can get because no one will ever eat the fondant.

mamawrobin Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 7:14pm
post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar

http://ladycakes.com/toppage3.htm

The is the recipe I use for my dummies. Made alot like MFF, just has water and crisco in it. It is good to me too. I'd use it on cakes, except my family doesn't like the texture of fondant. icon_smile.gif




I'm going to give this a try for my dummy cakes. I just like the workability of a gelatin based fondant. So much more "user friendly" icon_lol.gif

kger Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 11:10pm
post #24 of 28

I'm going to try Edna's recipe next, which seems to be essentially and MMF recipe with a few tablespoons of corn syrup.

justkist Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 11:22pm
post #25 of 28

I use a recipe I got from a friend. Essentially gelatin, glucose, powdered sugar and find it so much tastier than MMF, I will need to look into this MFF too though. I have a good friend named Michele Foster so perhaps its a sign! Have never tried fondant in the KA, only mixing and kneading by hand. DEFINITELY trying that next. Do I do anything special to the mixer bowl or hook?

mamawrobin Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 11:36pm
post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by kdripley

I use a recipe I got from a friend. Essentially gelatin, glucose, powdered sugar and find it so much tastier than MMF, I will need to look into this MFF too though. I have a good friend named Michele Foster so perhaps its a sign! Have never tried fondant in the KA, only mixing and kneading by hand. DEFINITELY trying that next. Do I do anything special to the mixer bowl or hook?




I don't own a KA icon_sad.gif I do however own a Sunbeam stand mixer and I use it to make my MFF. I do grease my dough hooks with crisco. I made many many batches by hand before I bought my mixer and it is so much easier with the mixer. Would HATE to have to do it by hand again.

I guarantee that you'll love MFF if you try it...like someone else mentioned..be sure to strain the gelatin mixture before adding so that you don't have any "solids" in your fondant. I use cheese cloth to strain mine thru.

ycknits Posted 10 Jul 2010 , 4:22am
post #27 of 28

Although I've been very happy with Edna's MMF, I will give the MFF a try so that I can compare. Sounds like many of you think the MFF is great, so I'll give it a go and report back. It's fun being able to do side-by-side comparisons of so many wonderful recipes and ideas. The Cake Central members ROCK! Thank you for being so unbelieveably helpful and supportive!!

kricket Posted 10 Jul 2010 , 4:36am
post #28 of 28

For covering dummies, I take advantage of those Michaels 50% off coupons and buy the big box of Wilton fondant.

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