Charge For A Toothless Cake?

Decorating By Ms_Cake_Lady Updated 9 Jul 2010 , 6:21pm by cakesbycathy

Ms_Cake_Lady Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 2:48am
post #1 of 8

A potential customer emailed this cake to me for her daughter's birthday. It would be a 10 inch cake, using fondant. A basic buttercream cake (little to no decorations) would usually run ~$40.

My first thought for pricing was $50 if the customer is planning on bringing in a topper or toy, and $60 if I model one out of frosting, but I always undercharge and regret it later. I'm getting better at pricing my cakes. I've been decorating a couple years now, mostly for fun but starting to entertain ideas of starting my own business so I'm taking this a little more seriously than before.
Any thoughts please? Thanks!
LL

7 replies
eatCakes Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 3:10am
post #2 of 8

My advice would be use a toy or don't charge for the cake.

KoryAK Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 3:41am
post #3 of 8

If your usual buttercream cake is $40, the $50 is probably appropriate for the fondant upgrade. However, this is not a standard round, there is a bit of carving to the shape.... +$10=$60. How are your modeling skills? How fast will it be to make this topper? I'm pretty fast, and I'd charge no less than $25 for the dragon (also did you see that his belly is off the ground, he's sitting on his legs? That's a greater difficulty factor) and another $10 for the basket and fish. =$95.

thatslifeca Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 3:56am
post #4 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by eatCakes

My advice would be use a toy or don't charge for the cake.




I'm sorry but am I missing something here? What do you mean when you say don't charge for the cake? Why wouldn't she charge for the cake? icon_confused.gif

PiccoloChellie Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 8:50am
post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by thatslifeca

Quote:
Originally Posted by eatCakes

My advice would be use a toy or don't charge for the cake.



I'm sorry but am I missing something here? What do you mean when you say don't charge for the cake? Why wouldn't she charge for the cake? icon_confused.gif




It's a copyright violation if she models the dragon herself. If she wants to sell this cake legally with a modeled dragon, she needs to get a copyright release from Dreamworks and/or the author of the original books.
If she makes the rock base out of cake and the customer purchases a toy Toothless dragon to place on the cake, it's not against the law.

CBMom Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 12:24pm
post #6 of 8

Just had to say LOL at the subject...

I'm thinking:
"Toothless cake??? Huh? Maybe the customer has dentures and can't chew fondant?? No nuts?? No dragees??"

icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

Have fun with the cake - it's cute! Don't forget to post your interpretation!

icon_smile.gif

thatslifeca Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 2:34pm
post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by PiccoloChellie

Quote:
Originally Posted by thatslifeca

Quote:
Originally Posted by eatCakes

My advice would be use a toy or don't charge for the cake.



I'm sorry but am I missing something here? What do you mean when you say don't charge for the cake? Why wouldn't she charge for the cake? icon_confused.gif



It's a copyright violation if she models the dragon herself. If she wants to sell this cake legally with a modeled dragon, she needs to get a copyright release from Dreamworks and/or the author of the original books.
If she makes the rock base out of cake and the customer purchases a toy Toothless dragon to place on the cake, it's not against the law.




Ohhhh I see....this little dragon fellow is like a cartoon or something icon_confused.gif I get know LOL thanks! icon_biggrin.gif

cakesbycathy Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 6:21pm
post #8 of 8

The client needs to purchase a toy of the dragon or you should turn down the order. You cannot legally make (and accept payment for) the cake otherwise.

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