60 People

Decorating By Rita1969 Updated 12 Jul 2010 , 6:31pm by dawncr

Rita1969 Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 12:11am
post #1 of 20

Can somebody tell me how big cake will feed 60 people?
Squire or round?

Thank you very much!!!!

Rita

19 replies
BakedAlaska Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 12:22am
post #2 of 20

I use Earlene's cake serving chart.

http://www.earlenescakes.com/ckserchart.htm

According to that, a 12" square will serve exactly 60 people.

HTH

leah_s Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 1:43am
post #3 of 20

The Wilton chart is the industry standard. If you use Earlene's chart you're simply giving away free cake unless you increase your per serving price.

http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

cutthecake Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 1:52am
post #4 of 20

I still find it hard to believe a 12" cake can feed more than a family. I like leftovers.

leah_s Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 1:56am
post #5 of 20

How many people in the family?

cutthecake Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 2:02am
post #6 of 20

5 in our immediate family. BIG extended family. We're Italian and we like food. It's not unusual for us to serve numerous cakes and desserts at family functions. My mother was a fabulous baker, and my sisters and I have carried on her baking tradition.

After a party, everybody takes food and cake home. I guess we never learned to cook or bake for just a few people.
(And a 1x2x4" piece of cake isn't dessert. It's an appetizer to eat before dessert.)

indydebi Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 7:47am
post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by cutthecake

I still find it hard to believe a 12" cake can feed more than a family. I like leftovers.


12" round serves 56; 12" square serves 72.

And you find it hard to stretch this to feed FIVE people??????

Remember .... each piece of cake that is taken home is ALSO considered a serving. So if 5 people eat 3 pieces (15) and then each of them also take 3 pieces home, that's a grand total of 30 servings. You wouldn't really say the cake served 5. It served 30.

TheBlonde Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 12:02pm
post #8 of 20

I use Earlene's cake serving chart as well. I find that Wilton's serving chart is more for wedding style portions. Most of my cakes are for birthday parties. I'm never there to actually cut the cake and I'm sure they will not cut it properly even after I give them my serving chart on how to cut it. I rather them have a little extra than not enough.

indydebi Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 12:20pm
post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBlonde

I use Earlene's cake serving chart as well. I find that Wilton's serving chart is more for wedding style portions. Most of my cakes are for birthday parties. I'm never there to actually cut the cake and I'm sure they will not cut it properly even after I give them my serving chart on how to cut it. I rather them have a little extra than not enough.


The number of servings is a suggested based on a pre-determined serving size. how the customer cuts it or serves it is not really something we should worry about.

KFC says their 16 pc bucket serves 8 people. I say it serves 4. 2 pieces is what "polite" people eat. I'm planning on serving this at a free-for-all picnic. Does KFC double the amount of chicken because I serve more per serving? No, I have to buy more chicken. KFC isn't worried that I'll "run out of chicken". They sold me 8 servings of chicken based on 2 pcs each. If I give each person 4 pcs, it's not KFC's fault.

A small can of Campbell's soup says it holds 2.5 servings of soup. Yeah, right! On what planet?! Do they give me double the amount of soup because I may not measure each serving correctly? No, I have to buy bigger cans of soup. Campbell's isn't worried that I'll "run out of soup". They sold me 2.5 servings of soup based on their pre-determined measurement. If I give each person more than that amount of soup, it's not Campbell's fault.

It is amazing to me that theoretically a customer will say, "Oh but we cut the pieces bigger than that!" and expects the cake maker to just provide more free cake. The amazing part is the cake baker who says, "Ok, I'll give you more cake because your family eats like Jethro Bodine and you expect ME to pay for it." icon_confused.gif

I would tell a customer, "The 8" round cake serves about 20, when cut in the standard 1x2x4 .... that's about the size of a folded over peanut butter sandwich." When the customer would say, "Oh we usually cut them bigger than that." I would tell them, "SOunds like you would want to purchase a 10" round cake, then. The price of that is......"

I don't worry about if they run out or not. It's part of my marketing and sales job to sell them enough cake and that's based on my conversation with them, not on my own personal insecurities. I KNOW an 8" cake will serve 24. I've cut 24 pieces from it for years. When they have the information and they still choose to cut it like bricks ..... not my problem.

It's not intended to sound as cold as it does ..... it's just business.

KFC ain't giving me extra free chicken ..... I ain't giving extra free cake.

TheBlonde Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 12:27pm
post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBlonde

I use Earlene's cake serving chart as well. I find that Wilton's serving chart is more for wedding style portions. Most of my cakes are for birthday parties. I'm never there to actually cut the cake and I'm sure they will not cut it properly even after I give them my serving chart on how to cut it. I rather them have a little extra than not enough.

The number of servings is a suggested based on a pre-determined serving size. how the customer cuts it or serves it is not really something we should worry about.

KFC says their 16 pc bucket serves 8 people. I say it serves 4. 2 pieces is what "polite" people eat. I'm planning on serving this at a free-for-all picnic. Does KFC double the amount of chicken because I serve more per serving? No, I have to buy more chicken. KFC isn't worried that I'll "run out of chicken". They sold me 8 servings of chicken based on 2 pcs each. If I give each person 4 pcs, it's not KFC's fault.

A small can of Campbell's soup says it holds 2.5 servings of soup. Yeah, right! On what planet?! Do they give me double the amount of soup because I may not measure each serving correctly? No, I have to buy bigger cans of soup. Campbell's isn't worried that I'll "run out of soup". They sold me 2.5 servings of soup based on their pre-determined measurement. If I give each person more than that amount of soup, it's not Campbell's fault.

It is amazing to me that theoretically a customer will say, "Oh but we cut the pieces bigger than that!" and expects the cake maker to just provide more free cake. The amazing part is the cake baker who says, "Ok, I'll give you more cake because your family eats like Jethro Bodine and you expect ME to pay for it." icon_confused.gif

I would tell a customer, "The 8" round cake serves about 20, when cut in the standard 1x2x4 .... that's about the size of a folded over peanut butter sandwich." When the customer would say, "Oh we usually cut them bigger than that." I would tell them, "SOunds like you would want to purchase a 10" round cake, then. The price of that is......"

I don't worry about if they run out or not. It's part of my marketing and sales job to sell them enough cake and that's based on my conversation with them, not on my own personal insecurities. I KNOW an 8" cake will serve 24. I've cut 24 pieces from it for years. When they have the information and they still choose to cut it like bricks ..... not my problem.

It's not intended to sound as cold as it does ..... it's just business.

KFC ain't giving me extra free chicken ..... I ain't giving extra free cake.




WOW, you have really opened my eyes here. You are so right! It's not my problem if they cut the pieces too big. wow... See my problem is that I'm just way too nice...lol I don't makes cakes as my full time job. It's sort of a side thing for me now, therefore I don't depend on the money for anything. It's just a extra bonus to me.

I will however be rethinking the way I do things though! Thanks !

confectionsofahousewife Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 12:30pm
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi


"Ok, I'll give you more cake because your family eats like Jethro Bodine and you expect ME to pay for it." icon_confused.gif




LMAO! icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

cutthecake Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 1:57pm
post #12 of 20

I don't disagree with the business end of it at all, as I don't run a business. But I think the slice charts are unrealistic for family, especially my family, use. By all means, bakers should charge by the chart, as they see fit. No argument here on that. And when I have purchased cakes, I always ordered more servings than needed. We MUST have extra cake. However, I don't expect free cake, and I will buy more than I need. I understand how it works from the business end.
I guess I made us sound like heifers--that 12" cake would certainly be enough to feed the 5 of us, with ample leftovers. (In fact, I rarely bake cakes for everyday consumption, and usually only bake for special occasions.) But it would not be sufficient for our extended family.
Debi, I would probably buy 3 buckets of chicken, just to be sure there was enough. If there's extra, someone will eat it for lunch tomorrow. Pizza, bread, it doesn't matter. Make/buy extra. (And if I was serving KFC at a picnic, you can be sure there would be trays of eggplant parm, baked rigatoni and sausage and peppers next to the buckets.)
Our Italian family members, especially cousin Jethro, would not come to our house and happily accept a 1x2x4" piece of cake as their entire dessert. We usually have a cake/dessert buffet offering something for everyone (for example, carrot cake for my brother-in-law, apple for my father, something chocolate for Mom, angel food for those who are watching their cholesterol, and whatever else we decided to make.) We not only plan meals according to the (formerly) Basic Four Food Groups, we plan dessert according to the Basic Cake Groups--Chocolate, Non-Chocolate, Fruit, Crumb, Low-Fat/Jell-O, and Other.
However, my husband--the businessman-- ALWAYS says, "You made too much food." "Do we need all that cake?" (His favorite dessert is ice cream.)
We went to a wedding last weekend at a wonderful, fancy-pants, upscale facility, and I laughed when the waiter served me my very dainty slice of "by-the-chart" wedding cake. (And then I thought of you guys and this topic.) It was a lovely dessert appetizer.

indydebi Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 2:06pm
post #13 of 20

cutthecake, I come from a Jethro Bodine family, too, so I totally understand what you're saying. A gallon of ice cream would be barely enough for one bowl for all 8 of us. When my mom cooked a sunday dinner with fried chicken, she'd spend most of the day frying 4 full chickens. She's buy a 20-lb bag of potatoes at the grocery and we'd only have pototoes twice a week because it took 10 lbs per meal. We Germans have very big appetites!! And back then, all of us COULDN"T gain weight! All of us were bean poles! My dad, who was 6ft tall just couldn't get over 165 lbs no matter what he did!

But family is personal and business is business and I was addressing the business side of it. thumbs_up.gif Whenever there's a question of "how much cake do I need for this many servings?", I refer to the chart. When people reply "but we cut 'em bigger than that", then I revert to "well, you're on your own, then! Do the math!" icon_lol.gif

cutthecake Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 2:13pm
post #14 of 20

And now I'm hungry.

JulieMN Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 2:16pm
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi



But family is personal and business is business and I was addressing the business side of it. thumbs_up.gif




Very true. My family goes through much more than the "published" servings....we make the necessary arrangements/adjustments in quantities needed when planning for events.

SugarFiend Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 2:49pm
post #16 of 20

Hmm, this thread has given me an idea. I'm going to Lowe's, buying a little piece of wood cut 1"x2"x4", and painting it to look like a slice of cake. That way when I go into business I'll have a permanent sample to show prospective clients what the standard serving size looks like, and they can make their own decision whether to buy more servings or not.

cutthecake Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 4:54pm
post #17 of 20

I think it's Indydebi who uses wooden cake slice pieces to show her customers.

Devil's advocate question: The rest of the food world "super-sized"--why not the cake industry? Just wondering.

SugarFiend Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 6:27pm
post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by cutthecake

I think it's Indydebi who uses wooden cake slice pieces to show her customers.

Devil's advocate question: The rest of the food world "super-sized"--why not the cake industry? Just wondering.




SERIOUSLY? I came up with an IndyDebi idea independently? icon_surprised.gif WOO-HOO!!! Granted, it's one little nugget, but WOW, there's hope for me yet! icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

Rita1969 Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 5:31pm
post #19 of 20

Thank you everybody!

That was fun. I will make a 12" and a 10" cake.
It is nor really for business, but not for my family either.

Thanks again!

Rita

dawncr Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 6:31pm
post #20 of 20

Some persons make the cake serving examples out of wood and others have made them out of styrofoam.

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=88648

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