How Do You Secure The Bake-Even Strips?

Lounge By KayMc Updated 11 Jul 2010 , 12:50pm by indydebi

KayMc Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 7:27pm
post #1 of 15

I used my bake-even strips for the first time this past weekend, and what a hassle! I can't believe that Wilton can't provide acceptable pins with which to secure the ends!!! icon_mad.gif The pins that came with mine were all bent over, and very flimsy when I tried to restraighten and inset.

What do you all use to secure these strips? I have to admit that they worked very well, but it took a tremendous amount of cussing at them during the application process, in order to get them on the pan!!!!!

14 replies
SPCC Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 7:34pm
post #2 of 15

they are supposed to be bent. You just slide it in. I lost mine though and I now use safety pins. If the bake even strips are wet enough after you ring them out they should stick to the pan while you are pinning the ends.

TexasSugar Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 7:44pm
post #3 of 15

T pins are what came with them. I liked them expect I was always poking myself with them. I now use those all metal binder clips.

Win Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 7:46pm
post #4 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by KayMc

I used my bake-even strips for the first time this past weekend, and what a hassle! I can't believe that Wilton can't provide acceptable pins with which to secure the ends!!! icon_mad.gif The pins that came with mine were all bent over, and very flimsy when I tried to restraighten and inset.

What do you all use to secure these strips? I have to admit that they worked very well, but it took a tremendous amount of cussing at them during the application process, in order to get them on the pan!!!!!




HA! REALLY!!! I threw the pin idea out altogether. I now use the small sized clip (paper) used to hold larger stacks of paper. It was the perfect solution. It holds the strips down tight and they do not slip at all.
LL

Uniqueask Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 7:47pm
post #5 of 15

YEP I use safety pins too, I actually use an old towel too, I learned that from Jennifer(MI), cut up, an old clean towel, into the size strips that you need and use them in the place of the bake even strips, saves a lot of money. at first I spent at least $100 on bake even strips and over time they destroy and I had to throw them away, so now I use towels.

matthewkyrankelly Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 7:57pm
post #6 of 15

My bake even strips are about worn out and I may not replace them. Just did a wedding for three hundred and did not use strips at all.

I learned from here to lower the temp (325 F) and bake 'til done. Used flower nails where needed.


All level. All good. No strips. Think I'm done.

Win Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 9:12pm
post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by matthewkyrankelly

My bake even strips are about worn out and I may not replace them. Just did a wedding for three hundred and did not use strips at all.

I learned from here to lower the temp (325 F) and bake 'til done. Used flower nails where needed.


All level. All good. No strips. Think I'm done.




I rarely use mine except when baking WASC which I find has a hard time finishing up in its center --even with lower temp and flower nail. Oh, and when I bake a half n' half cake (half chocolate, half white) they are great for leveling out the chocolate side since chocolate always wants to bake higher than white.

Kayakado Posted 7 Jul 2010 , 2:24pm
post #8 of 15

Yup, bent "T" pins. Not great for people with arthritis. You can buy them from any office supply store and bend them yourself. If you know someone who has a fabric upholstered cubicle at work, they'd probably have some extra. T-pins are the only way you can hang stuff on one of those cubicle walls

JulieMN Posted 8 Jul 2010 , 12:31am
post #9 of 15

I used the t-pins that came with them until they got lost (no idea where they ended up). In a pinch I used a large metal paperclip for one batch and bought safety pins and binder clips to try as well. Almost anything has to be easier than what is included with the strips.

KayMc Posted 8 Jul 2010 , 11:20pm
post #10 of 15

I have used T pins before, and they weren't intentionally bent. The main portion was straight, and it butted up against the top T portion. These were so flimsy that the main portion bent at the first microsecond of insertion into the fabric. A piece of crap! I like the idea of those black paper clip thingees, and will try that next time.

kansaslaura Posted 10 Jul 2010 , 11:10pm
post #11 of 15

I use binder clips, too--and wouldn't bake without those strips for nuthin'! I've made my own for years...

casme Posted 10 Jul 2010 , 11:45pm
post #12 of 15

I vote for safety pins, works great.

Echooo3 Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 11:35am
post #13 of 15

I also use the t-pins.

1) Wrap the strips around the pan before putting the batter in. Now you know where the pin should go. Take the strip off of the pan and put the pin in at the correct location.

2) Fill the pan with batter

3) Slip the pan into the wrap that has the pin in it

Hope that makes sense. That's what works best for me.

kansaslaura Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 12:42pm
post #14 of 15

You cakers using T pins or saftey pins must have better luck than I do--I would poke myself more than I care to admit. Especially with the safety pin. I think it has something to do with the lip on the pan. I'm stickin' with the binder clips cause I'm a sissy and don't like pokes! icon_lol.gif

indydebi Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 12:50pm
post #15 of 15

I'm with Laura ... no cake goes in my oven without a baking strip. I use striaght pins or those t-pins.

If you have a problem getting the pin on while the strip is on the pan, then wrap the strip around the pan, and while holding it in place (to keep the size right), slide it off the pan, insert the pin and then slide it back onto the pan. Works like a charm and it's real easy to slide the pin in.

But I've been doing it so long, I can insert the pin with my eyes closed. Like anything else in cake-world, practice-practice-practic! thumbs_up.gif

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