How To Torte And Fill A Full Sheet Cake??!?!?!?

Decorating By miriamshapiro Updated 8 Jul 2010 , 4:52am by miriamshapiro

miriamshapiro Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 3:58pm
post #1 of 11

Hi,

How do you torte and fill a full sheet cake without it cracking or breaking? I have average home tools (a Wilton cake lifter) and a small budget. Please help!!! Thanks!!

10 replies
2SchnauzerLady Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 4:04pm
post #2 of 11

You are a much braver soul than I am! Welcome to CC! Do you have a large piece of cardboard that you could slide between the layers and lift the top off?

Sucrea Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 4:07pm
post #3 of 11

I have only done a half sheet but I used a thin piece of cardboard to slide in between and then I filled it and slipped the top back on very carefully. I would probably have someone help with a full sheet. Good luck!

Rose_N_Crantz Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 4:10pm
post #4 of 11

Have you tried torting in pieces? When you make that horizontal cut, then cut the top layer(s) vertically into a few smaller layers of cake. That way you have a few smaller pieces of cake to move rather than one large piece.

Or make the horizontal cut, slide a cookie sheet pan (the kind with no lips or edges) in between the layers and lift off.

carmijok Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 4:17pm
post #5 of 11

Definitely a board or even a no-sides cookie sheet would help. But don't despair...even if it breaks only you will know...icing covers a myriad of mistakes. I once did a torted sheet cake and the whole top broke into several pieces. After panicking for a second I calmly pieced them together and glued them with BC. I then slathered on my chocolate BC and refrigerated until solid and layered more BC on until it was all pretty and smooth. No one ever knew. Oh, and I stuck a few small dowels in to keep the pieces from sliding.

sweetiesbykim Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 4:25pm
post #6 of 11

Is it a true full sheet pan size? Usually only commercial ovens can fit such large full size pans.
I have an assortment of cake boards I've completely covered top and bottom with clear contact paper to use for separating torted layers, leveling, etc. It's super cheap to make them, and they can be washed and dried and last for many uses! You can do the same with a full sheet size board or a large piece of cardboard box with no bends or creases. HTH icon_smile.gif

weirkd Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 4:31pm
post #7 of 11

Large cardboard and a good long serated knife! But what I do is bake my layers only 2" high and that way I dont have to torte them! I just put my filling on one piece and plop the other one on top. Frost and decorate and Voila! Much easier to deal with!

cakegroove Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 4:48pm
post #8 of 11

I also do the cake board/contact paper method

Jackie_PatriotsFan Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 8:38pm
post #9 of 11

I recently made a 12 X 18 sheet cake and torted it the following way. First I froze the bottom layer - this helped me also trim the top off easier. I placed on the cake board and put in fridge. Then I froze the top layer, again, trimmed off top and because it was still frozen, place on top of the already torted bottom with no cracking etc. Someone else from CC had posted this and I used this idea on my John Deere cake it I had no problems. HTH

Jackie
VPM of CPL Sean - currently in Afghanistan

matthewkyrankelly Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 8:54pm
post #10 of 11

What Jackie said. Freeze or die. You'll be happy you froze.

miriamshapiro Posted 8 Jul 2010 , 4:52am
post #11 of 11

Thanks everyone! Came out perfect!!! icon_smile.gificon_smile.gificon_smile.gificon_biggrin.gif

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