Standing A Stacked Cake On Its Side

Decorating By nonilm Updated 7 Jul 2010 , 1:53pm by nonilm

nonilm Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 9:06pm
post #1 of 9

I am planning to bake two 10" rounds, cut in half and stack three layers high. Then turn on the rounded edge for a half of a watermelon. Any suggestions on how to keep the layers together? I will use buttercream filling and frosting (they do not want fondant) but am afraid if I turn the cake on its side the layers will crack and separate.

8 replies
mamawrobin Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 9:41pm
post #2 of 9

I did this making my Dr. Seuss "green eggs and ham cake". (cake is in my photos) I stacked five 6" cakes together and used a wooded bbq skewer through the center of the cakes to hold them together. I carved them slightly at the end to form the "butt" of the ham. I crumbcoated and covered with fondant and didn't have any trouble with the cake trying to fall apart. I actually didn't know whether or not it would work but to my surprise it worked perfectly.

DianeLM Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 11:02pm
post #3 of 9

Trim some off the rounded side so the cake is actually sitting flat and not 'rocking'. Maybe about 4-5 inches across of flat surface. I assure you, it will retain the rounded look.

To discourage the layers from separating, drive two dowels or skewers through the cake at opposite angles to make an "X", and hammer into the base board. (I've done this and actually 'lost' a dowel in the cake because my angle was too horizontal, so it never hit the base board. LOL It was found with no problem.)

Hopefully, you'll be able to keep the cake chilled at all times. That will help hold it together.

What are you planning to use for the rounded ends of the watermelon? Half balls?

mccorda Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 12:41am
post #4 of 9

I agree that you should trim a little off the bottom and to use a couple of skewers crossed through the cake to hold it together.
I found my photo of a watermelon cake, that I made 30 years ago when I was just starting to make cakes, using the half ball pan and 6 inch cake rounds. I did not cut part of the bottom off or use skewers and it did start to separate during the drive to town to enter it in the fair. I was able to fix it and I got a red ribbon for it.
Have fun with yours!
LL

nonilm Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 4:35pm
post #5 of 9

Thanks everyone, I wasn't planning to make the round ends, they only need a cake for 20 so it will be flat on both ends, just three half rounds stacked together and the fourth half will be cut pieces of watermelon. I didn't even think to cut the bottom a little icon_redface.gif I will definitley do that and keep it chilled. AND pick up some dowels on the way home.

Now I'm just hoping I don't melt before I finish this cake tonight. icon_lol.gif

Kitagrl Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 4:49pm
post #6 of 9

Any reason you can't bake 10" or 12" squares...stack like a regular two layer cake....and then carve two sides to resemble the side of the watermelon?

That way its going to be structured and cut like a regular layer cake but still shaped right...you could even use an empty round cake pan pressed against the ends to help you cut the correct shape on the sides....

CWR41 Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 5:44pm
post #7 of 9

I agree, if you can carve your shape from horizontal layers, the layers won't fall apart from one another. It's a lot more work, but so much more stable and less stress.

(I tried making a Noah's Ark boat shape from standing up half rounds on their ends 20 years ago, and it didn't work. Luckily, my neighbors with ten kids didn't mind eating my mistakes, and I had time to construct another one correctly.)

Kitagrl Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 5:54pm
post #8 of 9

Actually I don't think it would be more work....have a friend or your spouse hold two round pans on each end of the stacked 12" square cakes and then just run a knife around to cut the sides rounded...and there you have it...watermelon shaped cake that will not fall apart when you start cutting it.

nonilm Posted 7 Jul 2010 , 1:53pm
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

Any reason you can't bake 10" or 12" squares...stack like a regular two layer cake....and then carve two sides to resemble the side of the watermelon?

That way its going to be structured and cut like a regular layer cake but still shaped right...you could even use an empty round cake pan pressed against the ends to help you cut the correct shape on the sides....




Ah but this would be the less stress way. My inexperience got me here. icon_redface.gif Last minute cake request and I was handed a print out of how the design was done in a magazine and was caught up in that procedure. And I baked the cakes before I really thought about it. In hindsight I should have stacked it the way you suggested Kitagrl.

All being said and done it turned out OK, but it is not standing on the round end. It was just too wobbly for me. I guess I need to find a denser cake recipe for things like this. I'll post a photo tonight.

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