I Wasn't Smart Enough To Buy An Agbay Yet.....

Decorating By KayMc Updated 1 Aug 2010 , 5:02am by infinitsky

KayMc Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 4:44pm
post #1 of 32

And here I am with an 11x11" cake that I wanted to torte and fill. My small Wilton thingee won't cut that large, so I'm screwed. I'm assuming if I try to do it with a knife, it'll be a disaster.

Assuming I DO purchase an Agbay in the future, where can I buy a cake separator (unsure of name) that large? I mean the tool that you slide under a layer to move it - like a very large spatula with no handle? Do they have larger ones than the one made by Wilton?

31 replies
pmarks0 Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 4:57pm
post #2 of 32

I had that similar issue with a 9x13 I wanted to torte. I took my small wilton cutter and cut into each corner as far as I could, and then I used a knife. I mentioned this to a 12yr cake veteran that I needed the larger Wilton one and she said don't. It's not very good, the blade bends...and she says that she does the larger ones like that too..just cut into the corners and then use a knife.

To separate the layers after you've torted, use a cake board. Slide it in between the layers and lift it off. Way easier, and no worry about breaking your layer as you lift it off. And it makes it a bit easier to slide it back on after filling the bottom half.

Doug Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 4:58pm
post #3 of 32

method 1:

GARROT the cake!

got dental floss???

if so, use tooth picks to mark all the way around the cake at level you want to cut -- just stick them in so floss can rest on top of them until your ready to.....

-- wrap the floss all the way around the cake with excess to hold in hands.

floss should cross over itself.


and then -- just like in those movies where they warp the wire around the good guy's neck and try to kill him by pulling the wire taunt....


you quickly and surely pull the floss tight.

it will cut into the cake and then through the cake (they never get that far in the movies -- decapitation too gross and the good guy as to win!)


-----

method 2: use a long knife and cut in from each side as far as knife will go --

again tooth picks placed around cake will help to guide cut.

Jamielc Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 5:00pm
post #4 of 32

Wilton has 2 size cake levelers ... the small one that's like $3 (handle with a wire) and a much larger one that's around $22 (sturdy handle with a serrated blade). I have both. I love the larger one and use it regularly. icon_smile.gif

Montrealconfections Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 5:01pm
post #5 of 32

I also don't have an Agbay, when I am stuck with a large cake I use a ruler & a long knife goes pretty well. I saw in the new Wilton 2011 magazine they have come out with a new torting device I don't know how the price compares with the Agbay but it definitely looks interesting.

Here is the Wilton link: http://www.wilton.com/store/site/product.cfm?id=25041F3E-1E0B-C910-EA7BF6A19B06DAE2&fid=251B2FB9-1E0B-C910-EA24D1C55B9E31E3

frankdiabetes Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 5:07pm
post #6 of 32

I bought the Fat Daddio's leveler since I couldn't justify an Agbay as I'm only a hobbyist. I haven't used it yet, but I would say just from looking at it and handling it that it's of higher quality than the Wilton one but probably less than the Agbay. BUT it's only $45...I'll have to see if it works well, or if I'll end up sucking it up and buying an Agbay in the end.

Fat Daddio's also has a big cake lifter, as does Nordic Ware.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0021ZSTG4/?tag=cakecentral-20

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B000237LPC/?tag=cakecentral-20

Edited to say: Doug! That sounds so morbid!

tesso Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 5:10pm
post #7 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug

method 1:

GARROT the cake!

got dental floss???

if so, use tooth picks to mark all the way around the cake at level you want to cut -- just stick them in so floss can rest on top of them until your ready to.....

-- wrap the floss all the way around the cake with excess to hold in hands.

floss should cross over itse


and then -- just like in those movies where they warp the wire around the good guy's neck and try to kill him by pulling the wire taunt....


you quickly and surely pull the floss tight.

it will cut into the cake and then through the cake (they never get that far in the movies -- decapitation too gross and the good guy as to win!)


-----

method 2: use a long knife and cut in from each side as far as knife will go --

again tooth picks placed around cake will help to guide cut.




are you spying in my kitchen? i love using dental floss. I also like it for cutting perfect crumb free slices of cake

sweetiesbykim Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 5:13pm
post #8 of 32

Another method:

Place 2 equal height forms of any kind on each side of the cake, then rest the knife blade on them to cut/saw through the cake . Like the method of using dowels on each side of roll-out cookie dough to get even an thickness while rolling. Just use stuff around the house:
tupperware containers, stacked cake boards, long boxes from foil or waxed paper, pvc pipes, books, etc. Hope this makes sense icon_smile.gif

Doug Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 5:14pm
post #9 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by frankdiabetes

Edited to say: Doug! That sounds so morbid!




and your point?!?

just remember who wrote it!

a B O Y ! !

icon_rolleyes.gificon_razz.gificon_lol.gifthumbs_up.gif

Apti Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 5:21pm
post #10 of 32

Howdy. I just successfully torted (is torted a real word??) my very first carved, 4" high 9x13 sheet cake. On July 4th I baked a flag cake with two 9x13 sheet cakes in a cheap, regular sheet cake pan. I used my Wilton leveler to tort each one. I left the sheet cake on my cooling rack, moved the Wilton leveler to accommodate the height of the tort I wanted then started on a slight diagonal and went from corner to far corner. Worked like a charm.

Found the tip online (sorry, don't remember where) to use a flat cookie sheet to transfer layers. I just bought one of the new Michael's brand 14x17 flat cookie sheets ($13 with coupon). After you tort, carefully slide the cookie sheet under the top layer and set aside. Then position your cake board over the part on the cooling grid and turn them both upside down. Then do your BC dam and filling. Now you carefully position the cookie sheet and torted piece and just slide it off onto the the other piece on the cake board. Repeat as needed.

After all the layers had their BC dams and filling, I placed the cookie sheet on top, added a book for weight and let settle for about 2 hours.

Doing it this way meant I had to add the fondant while the cake was on the presentation cake board.

Jamielc Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 6:41pm
post #11 of 32

Quoted: I saw in the new Wilton 2011 magazine they have come out with a new torting device I don't know how the price compares with the Agbay but it definitely looks interesting.

Here is the Wilton link: http://www.wilton.com/store/si.....C55B9E31E3



This is an updated version of the one I have. It folds in half for easier storage. Same price as I mentioned earlier for the one I have.

leah_s Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 6:50pm
post #12 of 32

IMO, the Agbay is the ONLY leveler that's worth any money, at all, period, end of story. Save your money and don't buy the Wilton crap, for sure.

Alternate method for leveling and torting.

Use a long serrated knife, laid flat along the top of the pans as a guide and cut. This should make your cakes 2" tall (unless you're using W pans which frequently ar eNOT 2" tall).

next, remove the cake from the pan.

Next add 1" of cake cardboards into the pan, and replace the cake.

Repeat step one.

NOTE: if your pan is not 2" tall, then adjust the height measurement accordingly so that you have 2 layers the same height at the end of the process.

Finally, save those $$ for the Agbay. Ask your family and friends to contribute any birthday and holiday $ to your Agbay fund. Yeah, it's that good.

peg818 Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 11:12pm
post #13 of 32

Instead of a cake lifter, just use a cookie sheet with out sides. If you must have a lifter of that size you might want to look at the pizza lifter, they are the same thing but with a very long handle probably able to find them in a restaurant supply store. Dont know if it is called a pizza lifter, but they are the same thing as that cake lifter and you avg size pizza is what 16 inches?

KayMc Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 12:50am
post #14 of 32

I love these ideas! I wouldn't have thought of using the small one on the corners and then finishing with a knife! Wow! And Doug, I was actually wondering if teh floss trick was an old wive's tale, but it seems to be real! Thank you!!!

KayMc Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 12:53am
post #15 of 32

Frankdiabetes! thanks for those links! I put the Fat Dadio one in my basket already! Woo hoo!!

Peridot Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 3:09am
post #16 of 32

Order the Agbay - best money I ever spent and you will never be sorry. No marking, no toothpicks, no dental floss, no long knives, no guessing, no eyeballing, no krink in your neck.....set the blade and away you go.

Use flat cookie sheet dusted lightly with powdered sugar or cornstarch to prevent cake from sticking to the pan or to the cake board if you use that. Be sure your cake board is sturdy enough to hold the weight of your cake.

I like the idea of the pizza paddle for a lifter!! I am going to have to check out the large Fat Daddio cake lifter. I have two of the Wilton ones and they work great for 10" cakes and smaller.

tesso Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 10:36am
post #17 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by peg818

Instead of a cake lifter, just use a cookie sheet with out sides. If you must have a lifter of that size you might want to look at the pizza lifter, they are the same thing but with a very long handle probably able to find them in a restaurant supply store. Dont know if it is called a pizza lifter, but they are the same thing as that cake lifter and you avg size pizza is what 16 inches?




that is called a pizza peel. icon_wink.gif

aprilblack Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 10:50am
post #18 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

IMO, the Agbay is the ONLY leveler that's worth any money, at all, period, end of story. Save your money and don't buy the Wilton crap, for sure.

Alternate method for leveling and torting.

Use a long serrated knife, laid flat along the top of the pans as a guide and cut. This should make your cakes 2" tall (unless you're using W pans which frequently ar eNOT 2" tall).

next, remove the cake from the pan.

Next add 1" of cake cardboards into the pan, and replace the cake.

Repeat step one.

NOTE: if your pan is not 2" tall, then adjust the height measurement accordingly so that you have 2 layers the same height at the end of the process.

Finally, save those $$ for the Agbay. Ask your family and friends to contribute any birthday and holiday $ to your Agbay fund. Yeah, it's that good.



thumbs_up.gif itto The Agbay is totally worth the $. Besides, its and investment.

Pickulz Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 2:33pm
post #19 of 32

Where do you purchase an agbay from?

psurrette Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 2:47pm
post #20 of 32

agbayproducts.com well worth the money

soledad Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 3:18pm
post #21 of 32

I have a though... could you cut the cake in half (vertical)and then tort?
Doug... I will look into the use of the dental floss as a cutter, which kind should I buy? icon_smile.gif Thank you Doug.
On the lifter... I was also thinking of the pizza thing ,I use to work in a restaurant supply store (this was...way before I got into cake decorating) icon_biggrin.gif ,and I saw it there I might just go and see if it will work and if it is not to heavy to handle because I do not have to much strengh in my hands. I have never made cookies(would like to!) so I am not familiar with the cookie sheet, but will look into it also. icon_smile.gif thank you all for the tips! icon_smile.gif
CIAO

Doug Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 3:29pm
post #22 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by soledad

Doug... I will look into the use of the dental floss as a cutter, which kind should I buy? icon_smile.gif Thank you Doug.




whatever you get free from the dental hygienist? i.e. the cheapest stuff possible.

even strong button thread would do it -- tho' I wouldn't use that as not food save and dental floss is.

KayMc Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 3:32pm
post #23 of 32

I know the Agbay is fabulous, based on all the positive comments I always hear about it. I'm a hobbyist, though, and haven't decided if I want to spend that on it. If I continue to make larger cakes, I'll probably do it... till then, I'm using the tips you guys all gave me!

Suzanne30 Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 11:22pm
post #24 of 32

I can remember my Mom using thread when I was growing up to split cakes in half. She never leveled the top though!

debbief Posted 22 Jul 2010 , 8:10pm
post #25 of 32

I never tort my cakes, I just fill in between two layers icon_redface.gif . I think I've just been too scared to try. Affraid I would make it uneven. I think I'll try that dental floss method.

As far as leveling...I learned somewhere, I can't remember where...to put a clean tea towel over the cake right after you take it out of the oven and gently press down on the towel to smoosh the cake down until it's even. This is how I've been doing it. I also started putting a smaller size cake board on top of the towel to make it easier and also so I don't get finger impressions on the cake. Does anyone else do it this way. Is there a reason I shouldn't be doing it this way? icon_confused.gif

honeyscakes Posted 22 Jul 2010 , 8:20pm
post #26 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug

Quote:
Originally Posted by frankdiabetes

Edited to say: Doug! That sounds so morbid!



and your point?!?

just remember who wrote it!

a B O Y ! !

icon_rolleyes.gificon_razz.gificon_lol.gifthumbs_up.gif



for some reason! I LOVE READING DOUG'S REPLIES!!!! haha LOVE YOU DOUG! Oh and Rylan too icon_lol.gif
- h

karabeal Posted 22 Jul 2010 , 8:28pm
post #27 of 32

Doug, I can't believe you just used "garrote" in a cake post. FABULOUS! Made my day! My hat is off to you . . . but I'll keep my head.

Sassy74 Posted 22 Jul 2010 , 10:23pm
post #28 of 32

Soledad, that was my thought as well. Does it HAVE to be in one piece, or can you cut the large cake into two manageable cakes, and torte them individually? I saw a tutorial on this (and of course, can't remember where) for a large two layer sheet cake. Rather than try to fill the cake and place the top layer on in one large unwieldy piece, the baker cut the top layer in two vertically, then placed the two pieces individually. Once iced, it's not noticeable.

BakingGirl Posted 22 Jul 2010 , 10:32pm
post #29 of 32

I always use the garroting method, I use regular cotton thread. Instead of marking with tooth picks I put the cake on the turntable, I hold a serrated knife against the side where I want the cut to go, then I spin the turntable to score a groove in the cake. I then wrap the thread around the cake, inside the groove, cross the ends of the tread and just pull through. Easy and cheap!

saapena Posted 22 Jul 2010 , 11:01pm
post #30 of 32

My DH bought me the two-blade Agbay for my birthday two years ago!! I was so excited I was literally jumping up and down lol. It is absolutely the best. Just be careful with it; my Agbay "bit" me and by the time I got around to going to the doctor it was too late for stitches--those blades are sharp!

The Agbay is worth every penny! Just do as Leah_s suggests and put your birthday and gift money toward it--you will LOVE it.

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