Fondant And Buttercream Bulges/air Bubbles

Decorating By amysue99 Updated 25 Oct 2014 , 5:08pm by rearly

kandyc10 Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 2:46pm
post #31 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by amysue99

So is it the cornstarch? Or is my fondant getting air bubbles because there are air bubbles forming under the buttercream, therefore distorting the fondant?




I roll my fondant out between vinyl and so I do not have to use ps or cornstarch. Maybe you could try that.

The_Sugar_Fairy Posted 19 Sep 2010 , 12:42am
post #32 of 60

Okay, I made three fondant-covered cakes in the last month that I never once put in the fridge (used non-perishable fillings) and not one bubble - everything was great. I put my son's fondant-covered cake in and out of the fridge as I was working on it and put it back in the fridge until two hours before the party. As it came to room temperature, a bubble formed under the fonant and cracked the fondant. Ahhh, thank God it wasn't for a customer! I used powdered sugar, not cornstarch when covered all of the cakes with fondant. Sooo.. it seems to me that the issue is refrigeration and I will not be refrigerating my fondant-covered cakes any more.

ladycake17 Posted 19 Sep 2010 , 3:36pm
post #33 of 60

Please help with this one.....I use a buttercream icing, I use Land O Lakes butter(salted), Wal-mart shortening, Wilton vanilla flavoring and Wilton butter flavoring and a little water. I make my own MM fondant, which I use 2 - 10oz bags of JetPuffed MM, 1 bag of powder sugar and 2 TB of water and a capful of Wilton Butter flavoring...when I cover my cakes, something happens under the fondant and it looks like water or something is melting and coming out at the bottom of the fondant. Then it will form a big bubble. This will happen in just one area, the rest of my cake fills firm and the fondant is sticking good, although the liquid is coming out all around the whole cake, but the one area where the bubble is is mushy. PLEASE tell me what is happening!! I posted about this earlier and I was using Counry Crock margarine, I was told that the margarine had water in it and it was breaking down and melting the back of the fondant, well, I switched to butter and it is still doing it. I do use cornstarch, I am going to try just powdered sugar today.

LindaF144a Posted 19 Sep 2010 , 3:41pm
post #34 of 60

what do you mean when you say you sue corn starch? To roll out the fondant? I use shortening on my counter when I roll out fondant. You can also mix a 50/50 blend of cornstarch and powdered sugar. That is what they teach at Wilton.

And in case others ask, how do you prepare your cake each step of the way. Is there any time that is in the fridge and out?

punkyf Posted 19 Sep 2010 , 7:37pm
post #35 of 60

Since the transfats have been taken out of shortening I have had this problem no matter what recipe I use. I think the pools of clear liquid is shortening. Very frustrating. It almost makes me not want to decorate cakes. Almost.

LindaF144a Posted 19 Sep 2010 , 8:53pm
post #36 of 60

If that is the case then definitely get some Dream Whip and add it to the frosting. Dream Whip contains hydrogenated transfat, so you will be adding it back into your frosting and then the problem should be gone.

Although SMBC is used under fondant all the time and that has no transfat. But SMBC has no shortening, so it could be vegetable fat vs. animal fat. I don't know, just speculating. In any case, add the transfat back in with Dream Whip and the problem should go away.

ladycake17 Posted 21 Sep 2010 , 7:30pm
post #37 of 60

Do you add 1 packet of dreamwhip to each batch of icing?

LindaF144a Posted 21 Sep 2010 , 8:44pm
post #38 of 60

Indydeb's recipe uses about 3 tablespoons which I think is about a half of a package. If you srsrchbthe recipes section for indydeb's recipe it will have the exact amount posted there. I would post a link, but it is too long of a process from my iPad.

The_Sugar_Fairy Posted 8 Oct 2010 , 3:38pm
post #39 of 60

Okay, I have another idea about this... yesterday I made my mother-in-law a buttercream cake and I used crusting buttercream (as I always do). Just before she served the cake, I noticed an air bubble under the buttercream. I remember adding more buttercream to that area because the cake was almost showing through (I probably added more AFTER it had crusted). Could the crusting buttercream be the problem??? Maybe fondant has trouble sticking to it (even though I usually wipe it with a wet paper towel first before covering in fondant). I'm going to start using the crusting buttercream's only as filling and try using non-crusting buttercream to ice my cake and to use under fondant. What do you guys think? I'll let you know how it goes. As you can see, I'm desparate to figure this out! So you guys that have had blow-outs, are you using a crusted buttercream? If you're not, that blows my latest theory right out the window, lol!
Also.. lately I'm having trouble getting a crusted buttercream smooth on my cake anyway - it dries too fast then my spatula starts pulling at the icing and leaving marks. I'd like to try and start using non-crusted buttercream for that reason too.

debbief Posted 8 Oct 2010 , 4:34pm
post #40 of 60

I had some pretty good size bulges and air bubbles in a few of my cakes. I always used the same method and sometimes Id get them and sometimes I wouldnt. Very frustrating because I dont know what to do different to prevent it. EXCEPT, the last 5 or 6 fondant covered cakes Ive done, I used ganache under my fondant. You can be assured, no bulges, no air bubbles, nothing. You get very sharp edges and nice flat, bulge free sides.

I really want to use buttercream again because ganache is more expensive and well, I just want to be able to use buttercream! But now Im scared to try it again since I get such amazing results using ganache.

I will say Im guilty of chilling my cakes. They go in and out of the fridge as Im decorating. Its just so much easier to decorate a chilled, firm cake.

sugarshack Posted 8 Oct 2010 , 6:16pm
post #41 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaylani

Has anyone compared the side bulge to the cake flavor/recipe? I am so annoyed with it that I have been driving everyone around me crazy. icon_surprised.gif

The icing dam is always the same, but now I am wondering if the cake density is part of it. I am going to start tracking that with the size of the bulge. My idea is that the weight of the fondant pulls down more on some cake flavors than others which pushes the buttercream out further.

Or....I may have been worrying about this so much that I am confusing myself icon_confused.gif LOL! I want perfect fondant covered cakes & these bulges are in the way.




I do think this is true. If the cake is very soft, then I will get those tiny bulges along the dam line, even though the dam is super stiff. The cake is compressing under the fondant, not the filling, and the crumcoat collects along the dam line.

Lemon, berry, yeallow... seem to be the culprits for me. That is whay I use ganache over soft cakes now.

Babs1964 Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 2:50pm
post #42 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Sugar_Fairy

Okay, I have another idea about this... yesterday I made my mother-in-law a buttercream cake and I used crusting buttercream (as I always do). Just before she served the cake, I noticed an air bubble under the buttercream. I remember adding more buttercream to that area because the cake was almost showing through (I probably added more AFTER it had crusted). Could the crusting buttercream be the problem??? Maybe fondant has trouble sticking to it (even though I usually wipe it with a wet paper towel first before covering in fondant). I'm going to start using the crusting buttercream's only as filling and try using non-crusting buttercream to ice my cake and to use under fondant. What do you guys think? I'll let you know how it goes. As you can see, I'm desparate to figure this out! So you guys that have had blow-outs, are you using a crusted buttercream? If you're not, that blows my latest theory right out the window, lol!
Also.. lately I'm having trouble getting a crusted buttercream smooth on my cake anyway - it dries too fast then my spatula starts pulling at the icing and leaving marks. I'd like to try and start using non-crusted buttercream for that reason too.



I've thought the very same thing, that the buttercream crusts too fast for the fondant to adhere properly so I've started misting my cakes lightly with water before covering in fondant, seems to help.
I also have a insulin needle that I poke all around the fondant then smooth again with fondant smoothers.

kimmy11 Posted 4 Aug 2013 , 3:14am
post #43 of 60

AI made a 6" yellow cake (denser cake ~pound cake) with vanilla BC. I covered it with Satin ICE and did NOT refrigerate. Noticed a huge bubble a few hours layer. So, for me at least, refrigeration wasn't the problem.

Homemadebytz Posted 9 Sep 2013 , 7:15pm
post #44 of 60

Still trying to figure this out, I get this so very often and it drives me nuts... NUTS!!! I think this definitely has something to do with the temperature. So frustrated with trying to figure this out..seriously!

shake n cake Posted 9 Sep 2013 , 8:46pm
post #45 of 60

If you get air bubbles I have the BEST solution. After kneading your fondant, and you place it on the cornstarch wherever you roll it. Flip the piece over and poke holes with a fabric needle. Poke holes ALL over the bottom, then flip it back over and roll it out. Ever since I've been poking holes in my fondant, I haven't had a SINGLE air bubble. I think it gets out any potential air bubbles before they form. Good luck!

 

Marissa :)

Claire138 Posted 9 Sep 2013 , 8:49pm
post #46 of 60

Thanks for that tip, am definitely going to try  it. Have been having nightmare bulges and bubbles lately.

shake n cake Posted 9 Sep 2013 , 8:50pm
post #47 of 60

Hope it works for you Claire, let me know how it turns out :smile:!

 

Marissa

Claire138 Posted 9 Sep 2013 , 8:53pm
post #48 of 60

I shall Marissa,

 

Have been so worried about this off late, it's  a problem that I had never had so am freaking out. Can't decide if it's the weather, change of cake recipe or if the different packaging on the chocolate I make the ganache with means different chocolate although the ing's are all the same - or some terrifying mix of all 3:(

Homemadebytz Posted 9 Sep 2013 , 9:51pm
post #49 of 60

OMG this sounds sooooo good and simple. I am definitely trying this out asap. I really hope this works I really really really need this to work lol ;) 1 question tho you do not poke the needle all the way thru right? just about half way or all the way thru to the other side? Thanks Marissa and I will let you know what happens, wish me luck. 

amyswtcks Posted 9 Sep 2013 , 11:09pm
post #50 of 60

Man am I glad I'm not the only one who has struggled with bulges in the past!

 

It's only been within the last year that I've finally figured out how to keep the bulges at bay. Oddly enough it seems that when I changed the type of fondant I was using that all of the bulges stopped. Other than that I have kept the same routine as before, so maybe it was that all along!

Homemadebytz Posted 10 Sep 2013 , 1:19am
post #51 of 60

AAmyswtcks ....what fondant were you using? What are you using now if you don't mind me asking?

amyswtcks Posted 10 Sep 2013 , 1:26am
post #52 of 60

Quote:

Originally Posted by Homemadebytz 

Amyswtcks ....what fondant were you using? What are you using now if you don't mind me asking?

 

I was using Satin Ice but now I've switched to Fondarific. For some reason I have found the Fondarific easier to work with, which has made covering cakes easier. Maybe that's why I have seen such a decrease in the bulges. Looking back on it, I realized that the Satin Ice was always to soft for my liking and it would make sense to me that a really soft fondant might slip more than a firmer one.

 

Just my theory, don't know if it's right. :)

shake n cake Posted 11 Sep 2013 , 1:38am
post #53 of 60

I usually have some that go all the way through and some that don't, it doesn't matter once its rolled out!

Peachie Posted 28 Mar 2014 , 4:56pm
post #54 of 60

Same issue here, until someone told me to use straws if its a layered cake to keep the weight lifted a bit off the next layer. tTe last cake I did,  no airbubbles!  Now I'm not saying you haven't done this but with a layered cake it did work for me. 

galletitadulce Posted 8 Apr 2014 , 11:45am
post #55 of 60

Quote:

Originally Posted by amysue99 

I know there have been tons of posts about this, but I'm getting frustrated. I am consistently getting air bubbles under my fondant and buttercream and small bulges at the mid-seam. But I'm trying to do everything right! Where am I going wrong? Here is what I'm doing:

1. Cool cakes completely
2. Fill with stiff buttercream dam, about 1/4" filling. Very thin crumbcoat
3. Let rest overnight on counter, weighted for smaller cakes
4. Ice
5. If using fondant, flash freeze (per Sugarshack) and cover.

What is going wrong? Someone please help!!!

Same thing is happening to me! I'm soooooo frustrated with this problem. :(

ChefTaaj Posted 19 Jul 2014 , 8:47pm
post #56 of 60

ACakes shrink when refrigerated and expand as they come back to room temperature. Think about a loaf of bread, place it in your fridge and comeback to it later and it's shrunk! I say this to explain the air bubble problem (That took me years to figure out). What's happening is when you cover the cake with fondant and refrigerate it, it shrinks and pulls away from the buttercream. Once the cake comes back to room temperature, hades fill the spaces where the cake deprecated and hence the air bubble is born! Here is the process I use and I get very few bubbles: Bake my cakes, wrap in saran wrap and freeze (I keep layers on hand all the time). Take the layers I need out and let them thaw while still wrapped up. Level, fill, stack, and crumb coat the cakes. I allow them to sit on the counter for about 20-30 minutes to allow my buttercream to crust over. I place the cake in the freezer for 15 minutes to harden. I remove the cake and cover it with fondant and decorate accordingly.

I WILL place the completed cake back in the fridge on the second to the warmest setting on the fridge until it's time for delivery (I have a separate fridge I use only for cakes).

This process has been VERY good to me! Nothing like slaving over a cake just to have an air bubble ruin it.

Jody130 Posted 28 Jul 2014 , 2:41pm
post #57 of 60

Quote:

Originally Posted by ChefTaaj 

Cakes shrink when refrigerated and expand as they come back to room temperature. Think about a loaf of bread, place it in your fridge and comeback to it later and it's shrunk! I say this to explain the air bubble problem (That took me years to figure out). What's happening is when you cover the cake with fondant and refrigerate it, it shrinks and pulls away from the buttercream. Once the cake comes back to room temperature, hades fill the spaces where the cake deprecated and hence the air bubble is born! Here is the process I use and I get very few bubbles:
Bake my cakes, wrap in saran wrap and freeze (I keep layers on hand all the time).
Take the layers I need out and let them thaw while still wrapped up.
Level, fill, stack, and crumb coat the cakes.
I allow them to sit on the counter for about 20-30 minutes to allow my buttercream to crust over.
I place the cake in the freezer for 15 minutes to harden.
I remove the cake and cover it with fondant and decorate accordingly.

I WILL place the completed cake back in the fridge on the second to the warmest setting on the fridge until it's time for delivery (I have a separate fridge I use only for cakes).

This process has been VERY good to me! Nothing like slaving over a cake just to have an air bubble ruin it.


When you wrap your cakes are they completely cooled or do you wrap them warm ?? and do you thaw them on the counter or in the fridge??

ChefTaaj Posted 28 Jul 2014 , 3:07pm
post #58 of 60

AI wait until they are coiled before wrapping them. I thaw them on the counter.

Jody130 Posted 28 Jul 2014 , 6:30pm
post #59 of 60

Quote:

Originally Posted by ChefTaaj 

I wait until they are coiled before wrapping them. I thaw them on the counter.


Thank you for your prompt reply~

rearly Posted 25 Oct 2014 , 5:08pm
post #60 of 60

I am on the verge of a nervous breakdown if I can't figure this out! 

For me it is always my smallest (top) cake and always using a 50/50 blend BC and shortening (never ganache or cream cheese).  I have tried refrigerating just before, after filled or not at all and yet it still happens.  My latest disaster is a 3 tiered wedding cake 6+8+12.  8"+10" had straws in them for stability so know problems the 6" developed a large bubble on one side, I popped the bubble and smoothed it out.  I then stored the cake in a box on my counter (19 C in the house Oct in Canada) and 4 hrs later the bubble was back in the same place, I then popped it with a pin and smooth it out, 6 hrs later it was back.  This happened 5 time in total before I ripped off the fondant and re-iced and rolled out new fondant.  I did notice that the cake seemed damp under the icing. 

I have 3 theories as to maybe why:

1.  My fridge has too much moisture and the cake is soaking it up? 

2.  I have pendent lights over my work station and maybe they are causing the buttercream to heat up

3.  I use constarch and spray with water.

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