Baking 11X11X3 Inch Cake Layer

Baking By smoothcakes75 Updated 5 Jul 2010 , 6:38pm by Jamielc

smoothcakes75 Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 3:15pm
post #1 of 12

Hi, I'm looking for some tips for baking an 11 inch (3" deep) cake layer, I definitely want at least 2 inches height,(I'll be baking two of them), so I can have a nice 4 inch layer. I have a heating core that I've used once and I wasn't too impressed with the shrunken circular piece that wouldn't fit properly back in the hole after. So if the cake shrinks inward from the sides (including the core piece), is the cake overbaked? Also - how much batter should I be filling the 3 inch pan with (2/3, half, etc) to get at least a 2 inch layer? It just seems tricky to get a perfect cake, when you have to use a heating core. Help! icon_smile.gif

11 replies
minicuppie Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 3:33pm
post #2 of 12

Welcome to CC. I like a thick cake, also. I usually fill my pans (2 inch) to the 2/3 mark and get a good 2 or more inch in height. Every recipe I use has a note on the amt it rises so as not to waste batter. I don't use the core. As you become more experienced you will get a feel for the temp and time you bake different recipes at. Note this on your recipe, also.

L_Collins Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 3:40pm
post #3 of 12

Bake right strips really help to make sure that your cake rises evenly and helps to make sure the outer edges of the cake don't over bake. I don't use a core, I use a flat flower nail inserted in the cake batter upside down. Hope this helps.

Rosie2 Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 3:47pm
post #4 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by L_Collins

Bake right strips really help to make sure that your cake rises evenly and helps to make sure the outer edges of the cake don't over bake. I don't use a core, I use a flat flower nail inserted in the cake batter upside down. Hope this helps.


Quick question...do you use both the nail and the baking strips at once?? ---I'm baking an 11x13 (3" deep)

L_Collins Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 3:49pm
post #5 of 12

I do use them both. The flower nail only leaves a very small puncture hole in the cake. It works great for me and whover invented the bake right strips was a genius!

Jamielc Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 4:18pm
post #6 of 12

Yes, you can use both the bake even strips and a flower nail. icon_smile.gif

grandmomof1 Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 4:19pm
post #7 of 12

Ditto on the flower nail!!!! Ditch the baking core.

KayMc Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 4:51pm
post #8 of 12

I did this just yesterday. For the first time, I used my square Fat Dadio's 11x11x2" pans. I filled it about 2/3 full, used a flower nail in the center, and used bake easy strips for the first time. I used the WASC recipe (with oil), and I got the 11x11 inch pan PLUS an 8" round! Both pans were nice, deep layers of cake. If you are filling the 3" pan, you'd still have enough batter for either a 4-6" layer or cupcakes in addition to the 11x11.

matthewkyrankelly Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 4:55pm
post #9 of 12

I do an 11x15x2 with two box mixes, that's 330 cubic inches. Your pan is 363 cubic inches. You'll get most of the three inches in the pan. Lower your heat to 325, use the flower nail. and skip the strips. It will work fine.

For bigger pans I use two nails.

Just did cake for 300 this way. All level. All baked.

lyndim Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 5:25pm
post #10 of 12

This may be a stupid question, but I'm gonna ask it anyways. How do you get the flower nail out? Does the flower nail protrude much higher than the baked cake? If you flip the cake over with the f.n. does it get in the way? I'll be baking a large cake this week and need all the help I can get! TIA! icon_redface.gif

smoothcakes75 Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 6:23pm
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by L_Collins

Bake right strips really help to make sure that your cake rises evenly and helps to make sure the outer edges of the cake don't over bake. I don't use a core, I use a flat flower nail inserted in the cake batter upside down. Hope this helps.




That's really interesting about the flower nail, I had never heard of that. I'll definitely try it out, sounds like less hassle! Oh and I will remember to use the baking strips, thanks!

Jamielc Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 6:38pm
post #12 of 12

First I line my pan with parchment cut to the size of the pan. Then I fill my pan with my batter, whatever size and flavor I'm working with. Last, I spray my flower nail with non-stick spray, flip it over so flat side is down and place it in the center of my cake batter (some put the nail in first, personal preference I say). When I turn my cake out of the pan, I just pull the nail out. Leaves a tiny hole compared to the heating core. For larger cakes, you might need more than 1 flower nail. And I hardly ever use the baking strips, too much of a pain for me. Best of luck!

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