How Do I Say This Or Should I Just Shut Up

Business By Lenette Updated 5 Jul 2010 , 6:33pm by CoutureCake

Lenette Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 1:20pm
post #1 of 15

I have an order for which I can design any way I want but we already agreed on a price.

I have no problem with the price but I want to do a cake that would normally cost more than that. I kind of want to say something to the effect of "I wanted to do something extra special for your daughter but this cake would normally cost $$$".

Understand that in no way do I want to make the client uncomfortable but I also don't want her telling anyone that the cake was "only $$$". Know what I mean?

Is there a way to phrase this so it comes across like I just wanted to do this particular design, like I gave her a deal without it sounding bad?

14 replies
leah_s Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 1:22pm
post #2 of 15

When I do that, I list the regular price on the invoice and a "Friend Discount" where I deduct the extra charge. They're clear they don't have to pay the "extra".

momma28 Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 1:32pm
post #3 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

When I do that, I list the regular price on the invoice and a "Friend Discount" where I deduct the extra charge. They're clear they don't have to pay the "extra".




Ditto. I usually just list "discount" . The discount is deductible if you are a legal business.

nana_marta Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 1:36pm
post #4 of 15

Leah I'm glad that works for you! I would be afraid that then they would always expect a "friend discount." Me being me, I would probably say I went a little beyond since it was for such a special girl. Why are we always discounting!? I do a church/school discount too!

leah_s Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 1:39pm
post #5 of 15

Oh I rarely discount. I will discount for other chefs (Professional courtesy discount) or a dear, dear friend who has done favors for me in the past. Not just for some I know. And I also charge the highest prices and for every detail, so that there's "room" for the discount.

Melvira Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 1:43pm
post #6 of 15

Yah, I wouldn't want her to think she's going to get XX% off every cake. You could label the discount as, 'first time buyer discount', 'special sale price', 'Independence Day sale' (depending on WHEN the cake is being done, where you are, etc.) List it as something you are comfortable with, which doesn't imply that she gets this price all the time, unless you WANT her to get this price all the time! KWIM? GOOD LUCK!

Aeropanda Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 1:47pm
post #7 of 15

I had the same situation when making a cake for my cousin that he was taking to a convention. I told him that if anyone were to ask, he paid XXX amount, but I was only charging him for the supplies. He had asked for a sheet cake, but t was an opportunity for me to have my work seen by many people, and I wanted it to be really nice.

nana_marta Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 2:24pm
post #8 of 15

Aeropanda- that is one of the reasons why I have a church/school discount!

poohsmomma Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 2:26pm
post #9 of 15

Could you call it a "creative license" discount since you got to do what you wanted?

minicuppie Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 2:29pm
post #10 of 15

I guess it is just human nature, but gentle southern conversation that includes the discussion of paychecks and "how much WAS that" is just plain tacky. IMO.

Ruth0209 Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 3:03pm
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by minicuppie

I guess it is just human nature, but gentle southern conversation that includes the discussion of paychecks and "how much WAS that" is just plain tacky. IMO.




I agree. I can't imagine asking someone, "How much did you have to pay for that cake?" It's just tasteless (unless maybe it's a really close friend or family member, and you ask in private).

When people ask me things like that in public, I just say, "Oh, lots and lots."

dldbrou Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 3:54pm
post #12 of 15

Maybe just call it a "Design of the Day" discount. In the south, when you get the urge to improvise on a design you give what we call "Lagniappe" ( a little something extra for nothing" (pronounced, lan yap)

Melvira Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 4:00pm
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by minicuppie

I guess it is just human nature, but gentle southern conversation that includes the discussion of paychecks and "how much WAS that" is just plain tacky. IMO.




Unfortunately we're crawling with tacky people! While most people wouldn't have the audacity to ask, there are those out there. thumbsdown.gif

catlharper Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 4:59pm
post #14 of 15

Yup, I would phrase it as a one time discount because I wanted to do an extra special cake for their child. You can start out with "I don't normally do this but" so they know it won't happen again. Cat

CoutureCake Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 6:33pm
post #15 of 15

I always called it my "Creative License Cake" for purposes of invoice... If you give me complete design control, I'm less stressed so you're getting what I give you, which is usually more than you paid, take it or leave it... My thought is put it down on the invoice as such because which would you rather have, creativity to do it your way or something that's suppose to be to the letter a specific design with no creative license by you to make it your work KWIM... Also, let them know this that if they aren't picky about the design and the price is within reason (still gotta make money!) you're the person to hire.

Believe it or not I had it on my website for the price for "hand over your details and I'll design a cake for you at $X.$$/guest" (which was $1/slice less than my normal)... The funny part is it's the value of giving up control to someone else and NO ONE ever took me up on it LOL..

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