How To Control Cakes From Sweating In High Humidity?

Decorating By TheCornerBakery Updated 13 Jul 2010 , 7:03pm by kensoven

TheCornerBakery Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 1:01pm
post #1 of 13

Hi to all,

I live in Orlando and I am having a terrible problem with my fondant cakes sweating?

I use a merinque (sp?) style buttercream to coat my cakes and I do put my cakes in the fridge.

I use either Satin Ice, PettinIce or Massa brand fondant and all of them seem to be sweating

Any advice or tips would be useful,
Michael

12 replies
leah_s Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 1:03pm
post #2 of 13

Well, stop putting them in the fridge.

TheCornerBakery Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 1:56pm
post #3 of 13

How can a cake with a mouse type filling not be in the fridge?

brincess_b Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 2:14pm
post #4 of 13

You need to weigh up your options. If you put your cakes in the fridge, you get sweating.
So to combat that, you stop putting them in the fridge (although in theory they will be fine once they dry up again)
so that means you can't use certain fillings. (also not sure how meringue bc holds up in humidity/ heat without refridgeration, so you might need to change bc)
xx

kakeladi Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 2:21pm
post #5 of 13

I don't think there is any way to combat the problem short of what has already been suggested.
If you box that cake before putting it in the frig do NOT open the box when you take it out; never touch a sweating cake. Just allow it to come to room temp and the sweating will evaporate.
Granted I do not have experience with humidity.....especially as bad as I hear it is in FL. Take my advice with a grain of salt icon_smile.gif

Doug Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 2:36pm
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

I don't think there is any way to combat the problem short of what has already been suggested.
If you box that cake before putting it in the frig do NOT open the box when you take it out; never touch a sweating cake. Just allow it to come to room temp and the sweating will evaporate.
Granted I do not have experience with humidity.....especially as bad as I hear it is in FL. Take my advice with a grain of salt icon_smile.gif




living in NC now and FL previously, I know that her advice is spot on about putting IN a box and sealing the box -- then refrigerate -- then leave in box to come to room temp.

and ditto to spot on to let it just sit untouched if not in box until it comes to room temp and humidity evaporates.

---
of course, impatient me does have one trick I rely on ....

puts it on dining room table directly under the ceiling fan with fan blowing down on it.

comes to temp faster and due to the constantly circulating air, very little, if any, condensation.

TheCornerBakery Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 2:37pm
post #7 of 13

Thanks for all your advice and input.

I do have professional equipment in my cake studio.

I work alone so I need to begin on Wednesday baking and crumb coating. I use Thursdays for finishing the cakes, Fridays for the outside design work and delivery on Saturdays.


I heard from in one of my classes with Nicholas Lodge to put the cake in a box so that is I think I will start with that technique

It only happens during the extreme FLorida Summer months so I will have to make adjustments

michael

kensoven Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 3:48pm
post #8 of 13

Hi Michael,

I live in Costa Rica and believe me humidity is a big issue here. After trying several things I ended up buying a small dehumidifier.

I put the dehumidifier in a small room and the cakes there, works like a charm. My cakes no longer sweat or shine (you can look at my pictures).

As someone said before, stop putting the cakes on the freezer or at least do not cover them with fondant until they are at room temperature again.

Hope that helps!

dguerrant Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 6:46pm
post #9 of 13

love the dehumidifier idea, here in arkansas (95 degree temp and dewpoint of 70 degrees)the sweating is a pain. This past weekend i had a two tier 60th b-day cake covered in fondant and frozen in order to survive the long winding curvy drive to the lake 3 hours away. The customer wanted it to be stable and not shift or slide, so I explained the options. we went with the complete the cake, box it, wrap in cello and freeze. At pick up, we put the boxed cake into a large cooler with instructions to not open the cooler until ready for the party. It made it to the lake safe and sound and came to a cool temp overnight and didn't sweat. the cake was white fondant with zebra stripes and lime green with a modern circle pattern and red whimsical roses. everything stayed perfect for the party.
sweating occurs when the damp moist air hits the cool cake surface, so to prevent it, you have to eliminate one of the two, room temp cake, or the moist air touching the cake. hope that helps icon_smile.gif

gayle_75 Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 2:01am
post #10 of 13

I have recently been doing more Fondant covered cakes, and have been experiencing the "sweating issues"! I have done the cardboard box sealed technique in the past, but I have recently purchased a Cakesafe box made with plastic sides that are kind of like corragated cardboard. Does something like that work, or is there something about the cardboard absorbing the moisture?I bought the box hoping to not need the cardboard ones anymore. I have my 1st Topsy Turvy fondant cake this weekend, and really don't want to be doing those last touches at the venue, but also really hoping that the cake isn't sweating!

Doug Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 2:09am
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by gayle_75

I have recently been doing more Fondant covered cakes, and have been experiencing the "sweating issues"! I have done the cardboard box sealed technique in the past, but I have recently purchased a Cakesafe box made with plastic sides that are kind of like corragated cardboard. Does something like that work, or is there something about the cardboard absorbing the moisture?I bought the box hoping to not need the cardboard ones anymore. I have my 1st Topsy Turvy fondant cake this weekend, and really don't want to be doing those last touches at the venue, but also really hoping that the cake isn't sweating!




any barrier, cardboard or plastic, that keeps the humidity in the room from reaching the cake will work

so your cake safe should do a good job of protecting the cake from humidity too.

mommynana Posted 6 Jul 2010 , 2:22am
post #12 of 13

love ur cakes, thumbs_up.gif kensoven

kensoven Posted 13 Jul 2010 , 7:03pm
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommynana

love ur cakes, thumbs_up.gif kensoven





Thanks Mommynana! icon_biggrin.gif

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