Tiered Cakes Terrify Me, But.........

Decorating By lvspaisley Updated 5 Jul 2010 , 5:21pm by rb822

lvspaisley Posted 4 Jul 2010 , 6:32pm
post #1 of 17

.......I'm thinking I might want to make one just to see how it all fits together, etc. I don't really know where to start, but maybe just a two tiered "fun" cake. What do you guys mean when you talk about torting and where do I start? I am freaking thinking about putting dowels in cake! YIKES!

16 replies
tonedna Posted 4 Jul 2010 , 6:42pm
post #2 of 17

Here is a simple video on stacking. It might help




Edna icon_smile.gif

chellescountrycakes Posted 4 Jul 2010 , 7:06pm
post #3 of 17

I'll let the experts walk you through the steps- icon_smile.gif

BUT, I use mcDonalds or Sonic straws to stack with, I dont use dowells. And I am not capable of cutting a cake in half to 'tort' it. So I bake 2, and put the BC between the layers.

Mamatoboys Posted 4 Jul 2010 , 7:14pm
post #4 of 17

Edna - Thanks for posting your video..you make it look so easy!

tonedna Posted 4 Jul 2010 , 7:20pm
post #5 of 17

It's a matter of practice. It gets easier the more you do it!
Edna icon_smile.gif

cake-angel Posted 4 Jul 2010 , 7:28pm
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by lvspaisley

.......I'm thinking I might want to make one just to see how it all fits together, etc. I don't really know where to start, but maybe just a two tiered "fun" cake. What do you guys mean when you talk about torting and where do I start? I am freaking thinking about putting dowels in cake! YIKES!




I saw your last cake. You can do this! It really is pretty easy. Torting means to cut a cake into layers. Example: take a 2 inch layer and cut in half. It allows you to have more layers of filling within a cake. Don't forget the Icing Dam.

To stack - you need a cake circle the same size as the cake that is wrapped in foil under it. Ice and decorate each tier seperately on their own board. Place your largest tier onto the display board/platter and add bottom border. Use a cake circle the size of the tier going on top to make a guideline of where you want the top tier placed so you will know where to place the dowels. Place a dowel/straw/hidden pillar/sps (varying opinions on favorite tools here.) into the cake and mark the level of the dowel at the icing line. Remove it and cut it and use it to measure all your other dowels. Make sure they are all leveled and not cut at an angle. Placew all dowels (or other choice) into your cake making sure they tgo all the way to the bottom and are in straight. The number of dowels depends on the type used and the size of the cake being placed on top. (under a 6" I use 4 - under an 8" i use 5 or 6). That is the basics. It is important to make sure your tiers are level before stacking. Hope that helps.

mamawrobin Posted 4 Jul 2010 , 7:55pm
post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by chellebyerly

I'll let the experts walk you through the steps- icon_smile.gif

BUT, I use mcDonalds or Sonic straws to stack with, I dont use dowells. And I am not capable of cutting a cake in half to 'tort' it. So I bake 2, and put the BC between the layers.




I also use straws for my tiered cakes. The cakes in my photos actually have McDonald's straws for supports. I had ran out of straws and had to order because I couldn't find any locally. I went to my local McDonalds and ask if they would sell me a few of their straws. The manager gave me a couple of handfuls. I still have some of those that she gave me. icon_lol.gif I hate cutting wooden dowels and the straws work fine.

nancyg Posted 4 Jul 2010 , 7:58pm
post #8 of 17

mamawrobin....How many tiers do you stack with straws I sooo want to try this but I am nervous...2 tiers...3 tiers...

Give me some more insite. And what particular do I need to know about the straws

Thanks

sherrycanary62 Posted 4 Jul 2010 , 9:00pm
post #9 of 17

stacking tiers is easy with a few simple instructions..the second cake I ever made was a stacked cake...it doesn't have to be terrifying at all.

I use shis-kabob skewers, they are sturdy and I can cut them with scissors, must remember to sand the cut end a bit for any wood particles.

Straws or skewers would work fine for a two tiers, but imo for a three tier you need to run a dowel down the center, you would have to sharpen one end with a pencil sharpener and then drive it through all three layers and their cake boards.

I personally don't make a dam if I am just filling with buttercream, but you would need if for a softer filling, such as a mousee, or puree.

hth

Marianna46 Posted 4 Jul 2010 , 9:32pm
post #10 of 17

I agree with sherrycanary about the central dowel for cakes of three tiers or more. This is in addition to the straws (my preference) or dowels you use to keep each layer from collapsing. The reason you need the straws in each layer is to hold up the cake board on the bottom of the next layer up. This is what keeps the weight of the upper layers from crushing the lower ones.

chellescountrycakes Posted 4 Jul 2010 , 9:58pm
post #11 of 17

mamawrobin- it was because of you that I got the mcdonalds straws, icon_smile.gif I couldnt find bubble tea straws, and was trying to find something other than dowells, which like you I HATE to cut- plus the displacement of cake scares me-

My Mcdonalds and sonic gave me a few handfuls each- I fiqure they will last a little while icon_smile.gif

tracycakes Posted 4 Jul 2010 , 10:07pm
post #12 of 17

If you use SPS, you will get over your fear. I used to hate tiered cakes also but now, I can travel with a 5 tier cake already stacked. I get to the venue, take it in, and leave. I highly suggest SPS. I just wouldn't trust straws, especially with a 4 or 5 tier cake.

tonedna Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 6:38am
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by tracycakes

If you use SPS, you will get over your fear. I used to hate tiered cakes also but now, I can travel with a 5 tier cake already stacked. I get to the venue, take it in, and leave. I highly suggest SPS. I just wouldn't trust straws, especially with a 4 or 5 tier cake.




I don't use SPS, but I agree with this. I don't trust sraws on tall cakes. Only on eight's holding a six or a four.
Edna icon_smile.gif

mrsc808 Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 7:15am
post #14 of 17

I did my first tiered cake for fun too, just to see what it was like. Still very scary, since I have only done 3 but I have to say that I watched Edna's video, then jumped right in. It's very helpful!

rb822 Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 7:48am
post #15 of 17

you need a cake board between each layer??? im still so new at this!

cake-angel Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 1:35pm
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by rb822

you need a cake board between each layer??? im still so new at this!




Just to clarify, you need a cake board under each tier... for example a cakeboard under the 12" round, one under the 10" round and one under the 8" round etc.

I am only saying this because I met a few people who misunderstood before and actually had a layer of cake, a board, the filling a layer of cake, a board the filling etc. icon_eek.gif Makes for a very difficult to serve cake. Please don't take this personally - I just wanted to put it out there since I have seen this happen before. icon_redface.gif

rb822 Posted 5 Jul 2010 , 5:21pm
post #17 of 17

thanks for clarifying even though i sort of figured that much!

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