It's Not The Taste...

Decorating By jqorso Updated 3 Jul 2010 , 6:53pm by Katiebelle74

jqorso Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 8:31am
post #1 of 22

...it's the texture of fondant that gets me. I can't stand it. It really bugs me to bite into nice soft moist cake and have a gummy chewy bit of fondant in there. icon_mad.gif There's always lots of discussion about which tests better, bought, made, etc; but the ones I have tried all have the same texture.

Anyone else feel the same? Maybe not, thanks for letting me vent!

21 replies
Katie1985 Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 8:52am
post #2 of 22

i agree! i like fondant....but by itself. My sister calls it 'fondant candy' because she sees it as a sweet treat that should be eaten alone and not with cake!

tinygoose Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 8:53am
post #3 of 22

I don't like fondant either, and i don't eat it, but I also don't eat those big globs of buttercream roses. Yuck, personally I like my cake plain, and I find most people love the look of fondant, and just eat the buttercream underneath. My cakes are all torted so there is three layers of icing/filling in each cake, that is plenty for most folks. If they really don't like fondant...no prob, I just make a smooth buttercream with fondant accents.

jqorso Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 9:12am
post #4 of 22

Oh good, I'm not alone. I agree that it's ok to eat by itself and as a candy. Oh and 100% with you tinygoose about the blob of buttercream roses. In fact, my favorite cake is an ice cream cake roll. No icing, just cake and ice cream rolled into a delicious log of heaven. icon_biggrin.gif

Texas_Rose Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 9:32am
post #5 of 22

When I first started out, my fondant was fairly thick and was noticeable on the cake. Now I've gotten more practice with fondant and it's such a thin layer on the cake that most people end up eating it. It seems to soften a little bit against the buttercream.

jqorso Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 9:38am
post #6 of 22

Texas_Rose, how thin are you talking? And homemade or bought? Thanks!

Occther Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 10:38am
post #7 of 22

I believe the texture is what a lot of people don't like. It isn't the taste. (Once people taste my white chocolate fondant, they have a different opinion about it.)

I prefer the look of fondant on wedding cakes and tell brides to go elsewhere if they don't want fondant. Of course, I only do cake as a hobby so I don't have to worry about turning clients away.

Caths_Cakes Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 10:38am
post #8 of 22

Funny isnt it, must be a location thing, most people in the UK think the icings (fondant) is the best part lol icon_smile.gif

Occther Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 10:47am
post #9 of 22

That is true, Cath - but isn't fruitcake the traditional wedding cake in the UK? Guests would freak out if that were served at a wedding in the US.

Caths_Cakes Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 11:02am
post #10 of 22

Occther, Your quite right, it is tradtional, with marzipan and a layer of fondant, Awful stuff if you ask me, but people here seem to love it lol

Summer09 Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 11:30am
post #11 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caths_Cakes

Occther, Your quite right, it is tradtional, with marzipan and a layer of fondant, Awful stuff if you ask me, but people here seem to love it lol





althou i wuld not have that at my wedding- whats the point of having cake if you yourself wont like it- i hate fruit cake. mine will be sponge icon_redface.gif

jojo76 Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 11:34am
post #12 of 22

True, no one minds fondant here in the uk really. I wonder if ours tastes different??!!
Caths cakes, are you finding you are getting more orders for sponge cakes for weddings and christenings these days? I dont get many fruit cake orders...but do get the odd one. Chocolate or lemon madeira seems most popular.

Cakelayer Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 1:59pm
post #13 of 22

I'm not crazy about fondant but I make a white chocolate fondant that tastes really good. It's almost like a modeling chocolate and it's more difficult to work with than fondant. I used it on a baby shower cake and I was surprised that almost everyone ate it with the cake. I always judge how good the cake was with how much cake/frosting is left on the guest's plates and they were clean!

DianaJJ

cutthecake Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 2:04pm
post #14 of 22

A sugar-based product? I'll eat it.

Caths_Cakes Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 2:22pm
post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by jojo76

True, no one minds fondant here in the uk really. I wonder if ours tastes different??!!
Caths cakes, are you finding you are getting more orders for sponge cakes for weddings and christenings these days? I dont get many fruit cake orders...but do get the odd one. Chocolate or lemon madeira seems most popular.




Jojo, I mostly get sponge cakes for weddings, But i get ALOT of fruit cakes at christmas, last year i had to make 26 for xmas alone, Its mostly the older population who order them though or people getting them as gifts for grandparents , they see they value in a good home made fruit cake for something special like christmas icon_smile.gif

Franluvsfrosting Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 3:57pm
post #16 of 22

I'm with you on the texture thing! My family adores good fondant but I just pass on the stuff. If I'm going to eat something that says it's chocolate it had better not taste like a tootsie roll (which in my opinion is not chocolate!) icon_razz.gif

LindaF144a Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 4:10pm
post #17 of 22

I would think of it as a shell and it's okay to leave it on the plate.

I don't like certain pie crusts. I'm not a pie crust snob, it's just that sometimes I like to enjoy the filling without the crust. Weird I know. icon_wink.gif . Pumpkin pie comes to mind. There is no reason why you can't leave it on the plate.

I know some people who enjoy cake without the frosting. Blasphemy! icon_biggrin.gif But they eat the cake and leave the frosting. Fondant should be no different.

Cakelayer Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 4:13pm
post #18 of 22

It's very hard to find a good fruitcake anymore and my husband LOVES, LOVES, LOVES fruitcake. Willing to share your recipe?

DianaJJ

Sassy74 Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 4:24pm
post #19 of 22

Ditto. Love working with fondant, covering cakes with fondant...not eating fondant. I can roll it pretty thin now, and my husband loves it on cakes. Me...not so much. But I would never say that to a customer lol .

jojo76 Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 5:52pm
post #20 of 22

Cathscakes - thats good going! I did a few for christmas too, but not nearly so many as you! Im going to have to up my game icon_biggrin.gif

Marianna46 Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 6:24pm
post #21 of 22

Strangely enough, it used to be traditional in the US for the top tier of a wedding cake to be a fruitcake, which could be saved without refrigeration to be cut on the couple's first wedding anniversary. I think it's kind of nice, but then I'm with cutthecake: if it's sugar-based, bring it on! I'm also with those who like their fondant separate from the cake. I've made fondant balls (and other shapes, as well) flavored with orange, peppermint, coconut, raspberry, strawberry, lemon, almond and about any other thing there is an extract for and sometimes I've added chopped nuts, liqueurs, colorings and anything else that I think of. I then refrigerate them and dip them in melted chocolate, just like I would for cake truffles. Mmmm, yummy! And addictive. And, more's the pity, fattening!

Katiebelle74 Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 6:53pm
post #22 of 22

I love the european marzipan on cakes with jam beneath it but way too pricey for the average joe in the us and not what people are used too. I do loke white chocolate fondant it is good. But I agree the texture is not something I am crazy about on my cake. Just because I was not raised with it, I like cream cheese icing and carrot cake or ganache and chocolate cake once in a blue moon I get a sweet tooth and want a buttercream iced cake. Ah crap I'm hungry for cake now.

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