Cake Stackers Vs Sps System Which Is Best Buy?

Decorating By hollyberry91 Updated 16 Sep 2014 , 7:58pm by leah_s

hollyberry91 Posted 2 Jul 2010 , 6:17pm
post #1 of 78

Ive always used dowels but after having an episode where a tier slid off during a delivery I want to change to an interlocking system. I know alot of people on here use SPS has anyone used both? The sps system is plastic and cake stackers is metal so to me it seems like it would be much stronger and could support much more weight? And from the website it looks like you can turn your cake completely sideways with cake stackers. Im just trying to figure out if it's worth the extra $ before making such a big purchase. Any thoughts welcome icon_biggrin.gif

77 replies
Katiebelle74 Posted 2 Jul 2010 , 7:15pm
post #2 of 78

cakestrackers holds up to 200 pounds and is very strong and stable. I am very happy with mine. I have not used SPS.

Katiebelle74 Posted 2 Jul 2010 , 7:15pm
post #3 of 78

cakestrackers holds up to 200 pounds and is very strong and stable. I am very happy with mine. I have not used SPS.

Katiebelle74 Posted 2 Jul 2010 , 7:27pm
post #4 of 78

sorry dunno why it did the double post

leah_s Posted 2 Jul 2010 , 7:29pm
post #5 of 78

I a BIG fan of SPS. When I have a customer pick up a cake (three tiers and under) I assemble the cake with SPS, and then in front of the customer I put my hand under the base board of the cake and raise it up and tilt it about 30 degrees. The customer, once they get over their initial shock, completely understand that nothing is going to happen to the cake during delivery and they will be fine moving the cake themselves.

SPS is very sturdy and cheap. You just build the cost into the price of the cake and it's disposable. Nothing to return, no parts to lose.

Easy. Simple. Strong. Secure.

It certainly meets ALL my requirements.

Donnabugg Posted 2 Jul 2010 , 11:30pm
post #6 of 78

The website to order is way to confusing with not being familiar at all the the system....but if I figured it right the cost for a 6-8-10 is $11.17 plus shipping??

Donnabugg Posted 2 Jul 2010 , 11:33pm
post #7 of 78

I don't even think that's right because I think you still have to have pillars?? confusing! lol

leah_s Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 2:05am
post #8 of 78

You purchase the plates in whatever sizes and amounts you need and then a bag (or more if needed) of pillars. There are 12 pillars in a bag - enough for a 4 tier cake. And there are three different styles of pillars - 4", multi-piece and 9".

MaryAnnPriest Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 2:17am
post #9 of 78

The SPS system is wonderful & easy! I used to do dowels and then started reading about the SPS (courtesy of Leah!!!) and I use it all the time now. Cheap, easy & disposable = icon_smile.gif

Give it a try. You'll never look back!

uniquecreations Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 2:25am
post #10 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

You purchase the plates in whatever sizes and amounts you need and then a bag (or more if needed) of pillars. There are 12 pillars in a bag - enough for a 4 tier cake. And there are three different styles of pillars - 4", multi-piece and 9".




Leah where do you buy sps from?

Katiebelle74 Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 2:54am
post #11 of 78

I know I'm the crazy one LOL but I actually like that what I'm using is not disposable I feel like it's more "green" better for environment. Although I could see how the cheap "disposable" SPS could be a plus for a client that's going to take the cake somewhere not local. I know it's a big investment for the cake stackers I think it comes down a lot to what type/size/ configuration of cakes you plan to do. One of the big reasons I've never tried SPS is that it does not seem to allow for a center column to drive from the top to the bottom of the entire stacked cake and I want a center column in those babies!

ElmwoodHero Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 4:29am
post #12 of 78

i will definably use this tip

barnes113 Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 9:30am
post #13 of 78

I KNOW THIS MIGHT SOUND LIKE A DUMB QUESTION BUT I LOOKED AT THE TUTORIAL FOR THE SPS AND IT'S GREAT BUT I MIGHT BE A LITTLE DENSE I DON'T UNDERSTAND, THE PART THAT I AM HAVING TROUBLE WITH IS WHEN IT SAYS TO PUT A WHOLE IN THE CARDBOARD AND THAT THE HOLES SHOULD LINE UP SORRY BUT I;M A NEWBIE AND THAT PART IS THROWING ME FOR A LOOP ALSO DOSE THE CARDBORAD COME WITH THE SPS OR DO I HAVE TO GET THAT SEPARATE THANKS IN ADVANCE.

FleurDeCake Posted 9 Jul 2010 , 10:26am
post #14 of 78

I have also been wondering if the SPS system allows for a center dowel rod to go thru the entire cake . I just like the extra security. Leah can you enlightnen us as to if this is possible with SPS. Thanks

barnes113 Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 12:37pm
post #15 of 78

HELPPPPPPPP icon_cry.gif are there any cc pros out there that can help a newbie. tia

cutthecake Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 1:03pm
post #16 of 78

When I made my very first stacked cake (which was for our family reunion), I had no idea what to do for support, so I followed leah_s' advice and used SPS. It was easy to use, and it worked. My only issue was not making sure the layers were 4" tall. Mine came up a little short, so I covered the gaps with wide ribbon. The cake was very heavy (with buttercream, ganache and fondant), and sat out in the August heat in a park for a while. I still don't understand WHY it works, but it does.
It does not allow for a center dowel, but I believe leah when she says you don't need one.
Since it was for my family, and I cut the cake, I saved the SPS pillars for re-use.

leah_s Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 1:47pm
post #17 of 78

I'm gonna shout this again, "The center dowel is totally, completely false security."

Sincerely, if your cake is going sideways, the center dowel will stay firmly implanted in the cake board and tear right thru your cake. No hope of recovery after that.

A cake is built much like a house.

First floor of house
foundation = bottom board
studs = SPS legs
floor joists = SPS plate
subfloor = cardboard
furniture = cake

Second floor of house
studs sit on top of the ceiling joist below = SPS legs sit on top of the cardboard and plate below

With a house all parts get tied together with nails. With a cake all parts get tied together with icing (bc or royal)

And consider this - those dowels many of you use are just sitting on top of the bottom cardboard. The difference is that dowels don't connect to ANYTHING at the top. It's like the studs in your house were never nailed to the ceiling joists. If that actually happened, your house would fall down. With dowels your cake is balancing on itself.

Katiebelle74 Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 3:31pm
post #18 of 78

Only if it is a cake stackers system the center dowel is fully connected top to bottom screwed and locked in place and the "legs" are screwed in place, fully locked down no chance of sliding or moving.

terrig007 Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 3:42pm
post #19 of 78

Thanks Leah for explaining. I am an SPS convert myself and I love it. I just wish the legs were able to be cut because sometimes for whatever reason, my cakes don't do up 4 inches and in other cases they do over. Maybe they do cut but I'm missing something, which knowing me would not be surprising one little bit.
terri

leah_s Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 7:00pm
post #20 of 78

You can cut the SPS legs with a miter box and saw, a pipe cutter, a chop saw or a hacksaw.

barnes113 Posted 13 Jul 2010 , 4:54am
post #21 of 78

thank so much for the answers but (sorry to sound dense) but how do i keep the cakes center is there a hole that has to match up. tia

RRGibson Posted 13 Jul 2010 , 5:26am
post #22 of 78

There's a little notch in the middle of each plate. You would use that to center your cake and board on the plate.

Leah is sooo right. That center dowel is such false security. It only took one disaster for me to start using the SPS system.

pmarks0 Posted 13 Jul 2010 , 6:27pm
post #23 of 78

If I understand how to use this correctly, for a three tiered cake you need three of their sps plates, plus the standard cake cardboard between the cake and their plate, plus the number of necessary pillars for support, for the bottom and middle tiers, and their separator plate plus cardboard for the top tier. I've still got to go up and watch a video to see it but, my question is, can you still put the bottom SPS plate on a fondant covered drumboard and if so, how is it attached?

Katiebelle74 Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 3:15pm
post #24 of 78

Personally I like that with the cake stackers it can be a cupcake stand, a stacked cake support system, a separated cake support system, hang from the ceiling, be used to make 3d cakes that are raised up on one slender post, you can put small to large or any combination in between..... it will do all sorts of things all with the one stand and it is not ending up in the trash, you invest in it once and use it forever.

cakesbycathy Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 3:45pm
post #25 of 78

The SPS system is cheaper to purchase thumbs_up.gif

leah_s Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 3:57pm
post #26 of 78

[quote="pmarks0"]If I understand how to use this correctly, for a three tiered cake you need three of their sps plates, plus the standard cake cardboard between the cake and their plate, plus the number of necessary pillars for support, for the bottom and middle tiers, and their separator plate plus cardboard for the top tier. I've still got to go up and watch a video to see it but, my question is, can you still put the bottom SPS plate on a fondant covered drumboard and if so, how is it attached?[/quote]

First there IS no bottom SPS plate.

For a three tier cake you need these SPS supplies: 2 plates, 8 legs.
Other equipment: 2 cardboards, plus a drum for the bottom.

That's it.

Melvira Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 4:03pm
post #27 of 78

Leah, if you'll indulge me for one moment... I have read the SPS instructions, seems pretty straight forward, and you being very vocal in favor of them has me thinking they really MUST be good. I just have a quick question. The plate has legs that go on it, then that pushes down into the tier below and another cake rests on top of that. At any point do the legs attach to the plate of the tier below it? Or are they just resting on the lower board as they would with dowels?

cakesbycathy Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 5:12pm
post #28 of 78

just resting on the lower board

Melvira Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 5:45pm
post #29 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesbycathy

just resting on the lower board




Oh, thank you! I didn't mean that info had to come from Leah of course, sorry! icon_lol.gif I just want to make sure I am 'getting' how the system works. Seems pretty affordable!

cakesbycathy Posted 14 Jul 2010 , 5:55pm
post #30 of 78

It really is. It's the only thing I use for stacked cakes. Assuming most of your cakes are 4" tall, make sure you order the 4" legs

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