Making Fondant Decor With Fondarific

Decorating By lecrn Updated 2 Jul 2010 , 1:07pm by cai0311

lecrn Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 7:06pm
post #1 of 16

I haven't had that much experience with Fondarific, but it is absolutely giving me fits!
I made loops for a loop bow 2 days ago made of 1/2 Fondarific & 1/2 Wilton with tylose added in. The loops felt hard enough to assemble the bow, but when I got it all put together, the loops started caving under the pressure. I've stuffed some tissue to give it more support, but I really don't think that the loops will dry hard.
I usually use Wilton fondant with tylose & give it the same drying time without issues. I'm probably going to have to make the bow again using Wilton.
Has anyone else had issues with making decor with Fondarific? It tastes really great, but I beginning to think it's much too soft.
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15 replies
foxymomma521 Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 7:11pm
post #2 of 16

my good friend called yesterday because she was trying to paint Fondarific with food coloring and it just wouldn't work. Like painting on plastic... wonder what the problem is. I like the taste and only use it to cover cookies or cakes. I use cheap stuff for accents. Sorry you are having such a tough time. The bow is still really pretty!

BrightDelights Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 7:23pm
post #3 of 16

I used fondariffic/duff fondant 50/50 with wilton gumpaste to make a loopy bow and it worked pretty well. No sagging or smooshing.

lecrn Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 7:23pm
post #4 of 16

Thanks so much for the compliment. I think that I'll have to do it over though.
I bought Fondarific for the 1st time last month for a cake, and had a lot of problems with it sticking even rolling it on a silicone mat and using powered sugar. I contacted the company and they sent me some more for free to try out.
I usually use Wilton for non-edible stuff, but was lazy and didn't want to color 2 sets of fondant (there will be other edible decor in the same colors).

lecrn Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 7:25pm
post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigsis22

I used fondariffic/duff fondant 50/50 with wilton gumpaste to make a loopy bow and it worked pretty well. No sagging or smooshing.




How long did you let the loops dry? I actually added more tylose than usual this time.

BlakesCakes Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 8:40pm
post #6 of 16

I posted at length about this last week.

Fondarific/Duff's Fondant use ingredients that are more like candy melts than basic fondant. Because of this much larger amount of fats/oil, it will NOT take tylose, cmc, or gum tex the same way. It is actually designed NOT to get hard. Adding more gum powders is just wasting them.

Rae

confectionsofahousewife Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 9:08pm
post #7 of 16

Rae, I was wondering if that was the case. I love fondarific but it is difficult to make any kind of three dimensional figure with. It just collapses onto itself and gets dumpy looking. I have had pretty good luck mixing it 50/50 with wilton gumpaste though. I made a bow (not loopy) with that mix and it hardened up nicely. I let it dry for about three or four days. Here's the link.
http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1596271⊂=1596275

BlakesCakes Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 9:14pm
post #8 of 16

Pretty bow!

Yeah, given that an all Wilton gum paste bow would be rock hard in less than 8 hrs., you can see how the fats impact drying time.

I'd also be concerned that in heat, the fats could separate and even the gum paste wouldn't hold something together.

I can see the coverning benefits, but, IMHO, they should advise people to not try to make dimensional items.

Rae

Karen421 Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 9:26pm
post #9 of 16

Fondarific is my absolute favorite fondant. That being said, it really doesn't hold up well in our summers in AR. So I have to change in this weather. Also, I am making roses and it took 4 days - but they finally harden, but only after mixing 50/50 with gumpaste and tylose powder.

lecrn Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 9:43pm
post #10 of 16

I also made a cake last wk with a simple fondant ribbon border made from Fondarific. I had some problems with it stretching & distorting.
I should have gotten a clue about it then, but thought it would be fine mixed with the Wilton & tylose.
I don't think that I will be buying it that often, unless I have a special request for it. It's not that useful to me if I can only cover the cake with it.
I agree they should have a disclaimer that it cannot be used for decor.

caleyb Posted 2 Jul 2010 , 3:21am
post #11 of 16

I am new to all of this so have what may be a stupid question - what is tylose and can I get it at Michaels or A C Moore? Is it a powder, a liquid - does it go by any other name? Thanks.

sweetiesbykim Posted 2 Jul 2010 , 3:45am
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by caleyb

I am new to all of this so have what may be a stupid question - what is tylose and can I get it at Michaels or A C Moore? Is it a powder, a liquid - does it go by any other name? Thanks.




It comes in a powder form, and is added to fondant to make it more like gumpaste -stiff, and better and faster drying power. Sharon Zambito of SugarShack uses it in her DVD's for bows, ribbons, and other details. Lots of decorators prefer it because you can use the fondant to cover the cake, then do the details with the tylose-added fondant so the colors match vs coloring fondant and gumpaste separately. HTH icon_smile.gif

confectionsofahousewife Posted 2 Jul 2010 , 12:27pm
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by lecrn

I also made a cake last wk with a simple fondant ribbon border made from Fondarific. I had some problems with it stretching & distorting.
I should have gotten a clue about it then, but thought it would be fine mixed with the Wilton & tylose.
I don't think that I will be buying it that often, unless I have a special request for it. It's not that useful to me if I can only cover the cake with it.
I agree they should have a disclaimer that it cannot be used for decor.




I use it all the time for fondant ribbons. It does want to stretch though so I usually roll out the fondant then let it sit for a time while I do something else. Then I cut the ribbon out then let that sit while I do something else. I was worried about using for the most recent cake I did. It had black stripes and black fondant (which black fondarific seems to be stretchier than white for some reason) ribbons on a white cake and any distortion would have been noticable but it worked out well letting them dry a little before applying them. Now that I think about it, I have used it for figures with some success. I did these strawberry shortcake figures with 100% fondarific (don't know what I was thinking, but oh well). But now I mix it with gumpaste for better results.

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1553694

cai0311 Posted 2 Jul 2010 , 12:54pm
post #14 of 16

I love Fondarific for covering a cake - but not for bows or really for most accent things. It does tend to stretch and become distorted. For those items I use Wilton fondant.

caleyb Posted 2 Jul 2010 , 12:54pm
post #15 of 16

Are tylose and gum paste basically the same thing? Could I just add gum paste to my fondant rather than look for tylose?

cai0311 Posted 2 Jul 2010 , 1:07pm
post #16 of 16

I love Fondarific for covering a cake - but not for bows or really for most accent things. It does tend to stretch and become distorted. For those items I use Wilton fondant.

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