What Is This Cake Covered With?

Decorating By veghed Updated 4 Jul 2010 , 9:59am by auzzi

veghed Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 4:50pm
post #1 of 17

My daughter emailed me this picture and said she wants a smaller version of this for her wedding cake. I have from now to December to figure out what I am doing. She does not want fondant because she says she does not like it (I'm gonna work on that) and wants a dark chocolate buttercream. This cake does not look like it is covered in buttercream to my untrained eye...but what do I know?

What do you guys think?
LL

16 replies
teddybr218 Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 4:57pm
post #2 of 17

Looks like a chocolate gaunche (sp) to me. The only other thought would be rolled buttercream.

TexasSugar Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 4:57pm
post #3 of 17

Looks like poured ganache to me.

CakeMommyJeni Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 5:05pm
post #4 of 17

Looks lie poured ganache to me too.

CakeMommyJeni Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 5:06pm
post #5 of 17

Like Not Lie, Sorry...Looks liKe poured ganache.

veghed Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 5:11pm
post #6 of 17

I thought it looked like ganache also. She says she likes ganache, so maybe that would be okay.

There's no problem with using ganache is there? I've never made it.

Molly2 Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 5:18pm
post #7 of 17

Maybe chocolate fondant that has been steamed with a hand held steamer I think that will make your fondant look like

Molly

tesso Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 6:15pm
post #8 of 17

It looks like poured ganache.. but i wish it was covered in my teeth marks!! it looks so yummy!! I think I need choc...

TexasSugar Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 6:19pm
post #9 of 17

Shouldn't be a problem, I've used it several times. I actually use chocolate buttercream for atleast a crumb coat under it, that way when I torte and fill my cakes there are no 'seams' showing. You want an even surface to pour the ganche on.

icer101 Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 6:37pm
post #10 of 17

i do like texasugar says she does. Buttercream it first, then pour the ganache over it .I start in the middle , as i pour and go to the edge of the cake. hth

veghed Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 6:45pm
post #11 of 17

I just watched a video tutorial on pouring ganache. How do you keep the ganache from completely succumbing to gravity and rolling right off the cake?

Anyone have more tutorials?

TexasSugar Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 6:58pm
post #12 of 17

Poured ganache is a thin-ish layer. It will coat evenly as you pour.

You also don't want it hot hot. You want to let it cool slightly, still be able to pour but if it is cooler it will layer a little thicker. If it is really warm it will coat thinner.

Doug Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 7:03pm
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by veghed

I just watched a video tutorial on pouring ganache. How do you keep the ganache from completely succumbing to gravity and rolling right off the cake?

Anyone have more tutorials?




it's chocolate.

it's sticky

(think children smeared with chocolate covered faces and hands and clothes and.....)

it easily sticks to the buttercream or, better still, whipped ganache covering the cake.

Fleur_de_Lis Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 7:39pm
post #14 of 17

http://sugaredblog.blogspot.com/2009/01/new-orleans-doberge-cake.html

This tutorial has some good photos of Sharon Zambito's buttercream coating and then poured ganache coating.

4realLaLa Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 11:51pm
post #15 of 17

My guess is ganache, probably poured. I have one like that in a cake book.

4realLaLa Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 11:55pm
post #16 of 17

Sorry should have read responses first. I guess I came late to the party. Seems like a consensus...poured ganache.

auzzi Posted 4 Jul 2010 , 9:59am
post #17 of 17

It's what the English call chocolate paste - kind of like chocolate fondant, modelling chocolate, and chocolate plastique..

Check out this site ..
http://www.traceyscakes.co.uk/pagesnew/chocolateweddingcakeset.htm

She also sells her own proprietary product which is very popular in the UK

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%