Two Layer, 9X13, Party Cake, Feeds How Many?

Decorating By pinky73 Updated 12 Jul 2010 , 5:19am by lovenintheoven

pinky73 Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 3:47pm
post #1 of 30

I kniow this question is as old as the Ozark Hills but I'm asking anyway...how many does a 9x13 inch, two layer (each layer in 2 inches tall) with a filling, serve? This would be a "party cake" and if someone would tell me how big the pieces should be cut, that would be helpful. Sorry for asking this but I'm trying to get it stuck in my brain.

29 replies
7yyrt Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 3:50pm
post #2 of 30

1x2x4inches or 2x2x2inches is standard size; 8 cubic inches of cake.

kakeladi Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 3:56pm
post #3 of 30

A piece 1x2x4 (called 'wedding serving') is the same amount of cake as a 2x2x2 (called 'party size') soooooooooo

Your 9x13x4 would be cut into 1x2x4 pieces and will serve 96.
Let the customer decide if they want to serve bigger pieces BUT.....base the pricing on the 1x2x4 # of servings.

For that much cake I'd charge around $150. I know, I know.... that's on the low end of the scale - only about $1.50 a serving.
Many are now charging $3.50 a serving.

awatterson Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 4:02pm
post #4 of 30

I just made one and it only fed 25 Navy guys. They ate it in 5 minutes flat, but it is supposed to feed 45 party servings.

lanana Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 4:05pm
post #5 of 30

no more than 45 party servings

tinygoose Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 4:05pm
post #6 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by awatterson

I just made one and it only fed 25 Navy guys. They ate it in 5 minutes flat, but it is supposed to feed 45 party servings.




Lol...Military guys, and football players should just be counted as x2, they are like food vacuums. I wish I could plow through calories like that. icon_smile.gif

tracycakes Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 4:14pm
post #7 of 30

A serving size is a serving size. I tell them how many servings there are and how big it is. If they have big guys or teenage boys, I recommend that they buy more cake.

yums Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 4:36pm
post #8 of 30

Holy cow! $150 for a 9x13? That is crazy! No way would that serve 96. That is exactly what confuses people. I just go by what I think a good serving size is and price from there. So I would go by 40 servings in that.

7yyrt Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 4:38pm
post #9 of 30

I have seen 1/2 of a single layer 9x13 go down the gullet of a teenage boy in about 3 minutes.
--
So, if I did the math correctly...
Double layer = 9x13x4 = 468 cubic inches of cake; divide that by 8 cubic inches of cake, and you get 58.5 servings.
Single layer = 9x13x2 = 234; divided by 8 = 29.25 servings.
-
Kakeladi - how do you get 96 servings?

pinky73 Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 4:39pm
post #10 of 30

Kakeladi: oh crap...I made this cake for a gal who needed it for a bridal shower and to feed 30 people...I charged her 50 bucks..oh dear...well, thank you for setting the record for me.

I can see how a bunch of guys would devour it within minutes, it's like throwing a steak to the lions cage..at least it's that way around my office!

Thanks to everyone for your quick and informative responses..I understand that once the cake goes out the door, there's not any controlling how it will be cut...thanks again everyone, I will be keeping this info close to the vest from now on.

pinky73 Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 4:46pm
post #11 of 30

7yyrt: one of my favorite words because it makes me giggle: gullet. Thanks for that, I needed it today! Also, thanks for the detailed breakdown of the measurements and resulting servings...that really helps...I knew when I put this two layered baby together, that it would serve more than 30 but didn't know how many more.

Thanks again everybody!

Dolledupcakes Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 4:46pm
post #12 of 30
cutthecake Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 4:56pm
post #13 of 30

Doesn't anyone ever want leftover cake? I sure do! And a 1x2x4 piece of cake is an appetizer to be eaten before dessert (which could be another--bigger--piece of cake).

lecrn Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 4:59pm
post #14 of 30

I thought a 9 x 13 x 4 would yield around 52 servings (cut 1 x 2 x 4).

tiggy2 Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 5:06pm
post #15 of 30

I also came up with 52-54 servings

Donnagardner Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 5:12pm
post #16 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dolledupcakes

check out this site

http://shinymetalobjects.net/cake/calculator/cake_calculator.cgi



Love this website

justsweet Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 5:15pm
post #17 of 30

Birthday and Party Cake Serving Chart from: http://www.fosterscreations.us
1/4 Sheet (9x13)

Slice Size  # of servings
2 x 2  =24
2 x 3  =16
3 x 3  =12
2 x 1 = 52
(2 Layer)

michel30014 Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 5:27pm
post #18 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dolledupcakes

check out this site

http://shinymetalobjects.net/cake/calculator/cake_calculator.cgi




Wow, thanks for this link. Really appreciate it! I will be using it going forward!!

Cindy619 Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 6:09pm
post #19 of 30

Here's a link to a sketch someone posted that shows how different size sheet cakes can be cut to yield various servings. I know the sketch refers to only 2" high cakes, but whether its 2" or 4", it still usually gets cut the same. Hope this helps!

http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1300481

pinky73 Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 6:16pm
post #20 of 30

great links to cutting and serving charts...thanks..my printer is busy right now!!

Dolledupcakes Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 7:43pm
post #21 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cindy619

Here's a link to a sketch someone posted that shows how different size sheet cakes can be cut to yield various servings. I know the sketch refers to only 2" high cakes, but whether its 2" or 4", it still usually gets cut the same. Hope this helps!

http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1300481




Thank you. icon_biggrin.gif I had to add it in my favs.

kakeladi Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 11:26pm
post #22 of 30

O.k. everybody I guess I hadn't had my caffine before coming up with my answer of 92 servings.....sorry about that! That's what I get for trying to remember things when I haven't used it for a long time icon_sad.gif

Just for the record.....that link to the chart .... www.cakecentral.com/mod....id 1300481....
Ijust took a quick look at it and I disagree w/their labling a 9x13 a '1/4 sheet'. The servings is good, but should not be calling it a 1/4 sheet -- That is a 12x8x2.

7yyrt Posted 4 Jul 2010 , 12:17am
post #23 of 30

Reminds me of the 8 inch '1/4 yard' pieces the lady at the fabric store always tries to sell me.

"Excuse me, but 36 divided by 4 is 9, not 8 inches."
I had better be getting 9 inches when I pay for 9 inches.

erin2345 Posted 4 Jul 2010 , 1:23am
post #24 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

A piece 1x2x4 (called 'wedding serving') is the same amount of cake as a 2x2x2 (called 'party size') soooooooooo

Your 9x13x4 would be cut into 1x2x4 pieces and will serve 96.
Let the customer decide if they want to serve bigger pieces BUT.....base the pricing on the 1x2x4 # of servings.

For that much cake I'd charge around $150. I know, I know.... that's on the low end of the scale - only about $1.50 a serving.
Many are now charging $3.50 a serving.




No offense, but I can't imagine ANYONE paying $150 for a 9x13 slab cake!!

cheatize Posted 4 Jul 2010 , 4:17am
post #25 of 30

It depends on the market, the decorations, the ingredients, and the overall skills of the decorator. While I may not be able to charge those prices I can certainly see how others could due to those reasons.

If it's a one layer cake with shells border, simple inscription, and a few roses- probably not. If it's a two layer with hazelnut filling, fondant figures and other fondant details- sure. As long as the market can bear it, that's the proper price and people will pay it. (Yes, "market can bear it" is a simplification.)

msthang1224 Posted 4 Jul 2010 , 8:13am
post #26 of 30

Wow, thanks for shaing the cutting chart info. I will definitely use rhem!

kakeladi Posted 10 Jul 2010 , 1:31am
post #27 of 30

........36 divided by 4 is 9, not 8 inches." .......I had better be getting 9 inches when I pay for 9 inches. .......

Here again, sorry for not keeping up with this thread.

My reasoning for using 8" as the dividing # is that *EVERY!* cake shrinks at least 1/2" after baking.
If it ididn't it would never come out of the pan icon_smile.gif
And........one could count (serve) the 1/2 serving left when actually measuring 2x2" servings in a *9*x*13*.

quietude Posted 10 Jul 2010 , 2:06am
post #28 of 30

Thanks for that link Dolledupcakes!

7yyrt Posted 10 Jul 2010 , 2:31am
post #29 of 30

No problem kakeladi, I was just airing a similar grievance I have with measuring at the fabric store.

I squeeze every last micrometer out of fabric. Sometimes that darn 1 x 45 inches of fabric means I can or can't make something.

lovenintheoven Posted 12 Jul 2010 , 5:19am
post #30 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by erin2345

Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

A piece 1x2x4 (called 'wedding serving') is the same amount of cake as a 2x2x2 (called 'party size') soooooooooo

Your 9x13x4 would be cut into 1x2x4 pieces and will serve 96.
Let the customer decide if they want to serve bigger pieces BUT.....base the pricing on the 1x2x4 # of servings.

For that much cake I'd charge around $150. I know, I know.... that's on the low end of the scale - only about $1.50 a serving.
Many are now charging $3.50 a serving.



No offense, but I can't imagine ANYONE paying $150 for a 9x13 slab cake!!



I am in Southern California, where cupcakes are easily $5-6, and a standard 1/4 sheet cake at a high end bakery is $140.00. Yes, a person can go to the local grocery store bakery and get a 1/4 sheet cake for MUCH less...but that's apples and oranges.

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