How Do I Get The Chocolate Thin Enough To Pour? Please Help!

Lounge By KayMc Updated 27 Jun 2010 , 7:12pm by sweetiesbykim

KayMc Posted 26 Jun 2010 , 9:35pm
post #1 of 11

I'm making my first attempt to made a high heel shoe via Jennifer Dontz's instructions. I have that wonderful mold, and I've melted white chocolate melts. Her instructions state to pour the chocolate in the mold, but mine isn't thin enough to pour. I have to spoon mine into the mold, and then smooth around. This means that it won't be as smooth on the inside of the shoe as it's supposed to be. What do I do? I have the second chocolate application in the fridge cooling as I type this.

10 replies
Tug Posted 26 Jun 2010 , 9:52pm
post #2 of 11

Try adding a small amount of crsico.

KayMc Posted 26 Jun 2010 , 10:15pm
post #3 of 11

I wouldn't have thought of crisco. I'll give it a try. Thanks.

grama_j Posted 26 Jun 2010 , 10:31pm
post #4 of 11

It sounds like you haven'theated it long enough....... If you are putting it in the microwave, give it another 30 seconds or so......

sweetiesbykim Posted 26 Jun 2010 , 10:33pm
post #5 of 11

I work with chocolate every day, and it sounds like either cheap chocolate wafers/old chocolate, it got too hot, or moisture got into the chocolate. White chocolate's a lot more touchy, and needs a low heat to melt compared to semi or dark chocolate. Let me know if you have any questions icon_smile.gif

DetailsByDawn Posted 26 Jun 2010 , 10:45pm
post #6 of 11

I agree with Kim - I always melt my white choc (candymelts too) at 30% power in the microwave. Sure it takes a few extra seconds, but the result is smooth, creamy chocolate which is pourable. Once you fill the mold, also remember to tap out all the air bubbles - this will give you the very smooth finish you're looking for. Good luck!

DianeLM Posted 26 Jun 2010 , 10:46pm
post #7 of 11

I agree with sweetiesbykim -- probably old or overheated. Adding Crisco will thin it out, but if you're using confectioners coating (candy melts), get yourself some paramount crystals. They are flakes of the same oil that is in the confectioners coating, so they'll blend in perfectly without changing the taste.

However, you can still successfully fill a mold with thick chocolate. Simply tap the mold on the counter after you add each 'blob'. Ultimately, it will all homogenize and fill the mold completely. When filled, tap the mold a few more times to remove any air bubbles.

KayMc Posted 26 Jun 2010 , 11:55pm
post #8 of 11

I'm not familiar with these chocolate melting wafers, so I didn't know to nuke it @ 30% power. icon_cry.gif I did melt it at full power, so that's probably it. Thank you for the education, so I know what to do next time. I filled the mold with a spoon, and tried to smooth it out. For my first attempt, the shoe is ok. I'm learning as I go, and will be doing this again. I love this high heel! Even though it's not remotely perfect like the one made by Jennifer Dontz. I'll just keep practicing...

BlakesCakes Posted 27 Jun 2010 , 12:32am
post #9 of 11

Also, melt the candy melt/wafers in a plastic bowl that is microwave safe. Glass creates too many hot spots and it can scorch them quickly.

I melt on 50% power for 30 seconds, stir, and repeat until about 90% are melted and then stir until the rest melt.

Adding paramount crystals means that they'll set up hard with a good shine. Adding crisco or vegetable oil means that they'll set up "soft" and be a bit dull.

HTH
Rae

BlakesCakes Posted 27 Jun 2010 , 12:33am
post #10 of 11

Also, melt the candy melt/wafers in a plastic bowl that is microwave safe. Glass creates too many hot spots and it can scorch them quickly.

I melt on 50% power for 30 seconds, stir, and repeat until about 90% are melted and then stir until the rest melt.

Adding paramount crystals means that they'll set up hard with a good shine. Adding crisco or vegetable oil means that they'll set up "soft" and be a bit dull.

HTH
Rae

sweetiesbykim Posted 27 Jun 2010 , 7:12pm
post #11 of 11

Yes, I also nuke for 30 seconds at a time, stirring after each, for a total of maybe 90 seconds, but not until it's completely melted and don't let the outside of the bowl too hot. "Carry-over" heat will melt the rest of it without risking additional heating time. It's just like how the internal temp of meat keeps rising and cooking until it's out of the oven for a few minutes.

Instead of a spoon, try filling a plastic food-safe squirt bottle with the melted chocolate -works great for small molds and flooding in details!! Just make sure to remove the chocolate before it hardens in the bottle! I use a really great locally produced chocolate, but Merckens is good too. Just no cheap craft store chocolate please! icon_smile.gif

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%