Baking 1/2 And 1/2 Sheet Cake

Baking By caleyb Updated 29 Jun 2010 , 4:22am by mbark

caleyb Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 10:36pm
post #1 of 20

I baked a 12x18 1/2 and 1/2 sheet cake today - has anyone had trouble with the chocolate side not baking as quickly as the yellow....I left it in a little longer but was afraid the yellow would be overbaked....but toothpick from the chocolate was still not clean....any suggestions to avoiding this next time? Oh, I did use 2 flower nails in the center, too!

19 replies
Elaine2581 Posted 26 Jun 2010 , 3:16am
post #2 of 20

Are you saying that in the same pan you put two different kinds of cake batter? I've never done it that way. I just bake two different cakes and then put them together. I would definitely think that my chocolate and plain take different amounts of time to bake. Let us know how it comes out.

caleyb Posted 26 Jun 2010 , 1:26pm
post #3 of 20

Yes, my Wilton instructor, as well as someone on anothe forum on this site, told us how to bake a half and half cake in the same pan. The technique worked perfectly....but the baking was off.

KHalstead Posted 26 Jun 2010 , 1:45pm
post #4 of 20

I do it all the time and don't have any problems with one side not baking.......by the way, you want to pull that out when the choc. side has crumbs stuck to the toothpick, not wet batter, but not a clean toothpick either or it will be overbaked.

I always pull the cakes out when there are crumbs on the tester and they come out moist, dense and delicious! Especially the chocolate!

caleyb Posted 26 Jun 2010 , 2:37pm
post #5 of 20

Lets hope it worked....

indydebi Posted 26 Jun 2010 , 4:02pm
post #6 of 20

I not only always bake two different flavors in the same pan, but I can't even remember a sheet cake that WASN'T two different flavors. It long ago became SOP (Standard Operating Procedure) to me.

I think people are more impressed that it's 2 flavors in one cake and it's less work for me.

Yes, chocolate cake takes a bit longer to bake. It also tends to rise higher than other cake flavors. But it was never an issue when I baked one of these half and half's up. For a 12x18, which takes 3 cake mixes, I always did 2 white and 1 chocolate. Because chocolate tends to rise higher, that means it would expand in the pan and take up abotu half of the space, making my 2/3 and 1/3 cake more like half and half by the time it was done.

Mombo Posted 26 Jun 2010 , 4:29pm
post #7 of 20

I am interested in how you bake the two flavors in one pan...are they marbled together or totally separate?

jsclar03 Posted 26 Jun 2010 , 4:39pm
post #8 of 20

I second that, how is it done?

indydebi Posted 26 Jun 2010 , 4:39pm
post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mombo

I am interested in how you bake the two flavors in one pan...are they marbled together or totally separate?


Separate. Pour one flavor in one end; pour the other flavor in the other end. The batter meets in the middle.

To answer the frequent question, no they do not blend together when they meet in the middle. It's batter, not Kool-Aid. thumbs_up.gif

Mombo Posted 26 Jun 2010 , 4:49pm
post #10 of 20

I don't doubt you. It is just hard to believe that it works that way. I guess I'll have to try it for myself. I have found that sometimes in life we tend to complicate things, this is an easy one!

juleebug Posted 26 Jun 2010 , 5:06pm
post #11 of 20

Here's a video that shows you how to do it:


indydebi Posted 26 Jun 2010 , 7:48pm
post #12 of 20

excellent video ... that's exactly how I do it.

Mombo Posted 26 Jun 2010 , 11:07pm
post #13 of 20

THanks for the info, great video and will definitely try it out!

hammer1 Posted 26 Jun 2010 , 11:27pm
post #14 of 20

yep, we do it all the time, except we take a knife of wooden spoon handle and marble the two together in the middle, that is my favorite piece. We have even done three colors in one pan. On that one I do have to draft another person to help pour all three colors at once. marble where the colors meet and surprise all when the cake is cut. works everytime, just like debi said. Hey deb hows the classes coming?

auntbeesbaking Posted 27 Jun 2010 , 12:02am
post #15 of 20

I have also taken foil and folded it up so I had a stiff piece. I then put it in the middle of the pan (short side) to measure where I need to fold it. It ends up looking like a "Z". This keeps the batter from separating. After I have both sides filled, I carefully lift the foil straight up and put any excess batter on the foil in the appropriate side.

Janretha Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 3:17am
post #16 of 20

I want to bake a sheet cake, I want to bake a pound cake. I need to know how much batter I need to make for a 9x13 sheet cake. I have recipes for bundt cake pans but no sheet cake. Please help.

indydebi Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 3:18am
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Janretha

I want to bake a sheet cake, I want to bake a pound cake. I need to know how much batter I need to make for a 9x13 sheet cake. I have recipes for bundt cake pans but no sheet cake. Please help.


It's just a different pan. Pour it in a sheet pan instead of a bundt pan.

Janretha Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 3:27am
post #18 of 20

ok, I am just worried the batter might not be enough.

indydebi Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 3:35am
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Janretha

ok, I am just worried the batter might not be enough.


how many cakes mixes does the bundt pan take? how many cake mixes does the 9x13 take? If they are the same, you're fine.

mbark Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 4:22am
post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by juleebug

Here's a video that shows you how to do it:





very clever. I never would have thought to do that.

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