Modeling Chocolate

Decorating By snickers34 Updated 25 Jun 2010 , 5:29pm by Herekittykitty

snickers34 Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 3:46pm
post #1 of 11

Please can someone help me I'm about ready to pull my hair out!!! I'm trying to make modeling chocolate so that I can make roses for a cake that I have to do for next weekand. The problem is once I start working the chocolate it gets oily and I can't make my petals because its too soft. Did anyone have this problem? What am I doing wrong? I tried the recipe from cake central and I used chocolate chips and when that didn't work i tried the blocks of chocolate and got the same results...HELP!!!

10 replies
CWIL Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 3:53pm
post #2 of 11

Modeling chocolate can be very hard to work with when your hands are hot. When I'm trying to work with it what I do is stick it in the fridgefor a bit (just long enough for it to get hard), then work with it as fast as you can. If it starts getting soft again, stick it back in the fridge. I used the recipe found on here also, but used candy melts instead of chocolate. Good luck.

kimblyd Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 4:01pm
post #3 of 11

I also use candy melts for my modeling chocolate. After I make it, I try to let as much excess oil drip off of it as I can. I wear plastic gloves and use to my hands to mix the modeling chocolate thoroughly. Then I put in a ziplock bag and let it set overnight.

The next day break off chunks the size you need and work it with your hands until it softens and you can roll it out. It might be helpful to let it sit and cool down between handling and rolling and cutting. Also try to work fast.

HTH.

cutthecake Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 4:06pm
post #4 of 11

I blot some of the oil off with a clean paper towel, too.

Rog2e Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 4:10pm
post #5 of 11

Are you making realistic roses? Modeling chocolate might not be a good choice for this since it never really firms up and actually becomes software as you work with it. I know realistic roses require a lot of handling. The more you touch it the more it becomes soft because of the heat and moisture from your hands.

My wife uses will use gumpaste or fondant for her roses and modeling chocolate for work that needs a lot of detail but can't dry out on her while doing the details.

But as CWIL said, keep sticking it in the fridge when it gets too soft, also if its humid where you live make sure your AC is running to keep moisture in the air to a minimum.

AnotherCreation Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 4:16pm
post #6 of 11

I make all of my roses out of modeling chocolate. I think they look very realistic. Here is the pic of the first one I ever made http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1574597
I use 10 ounces of candy melts and 1/3 cup corn syrup. The oil happens when the chocolate is overworked. Just set it down and come back. I personally like using the chocolate because it sets up faster and tast better!!!

I wanted to add that I cut out the petals and let them sit for a few minutes then I assemble the rose. It is true about the warm hands. I wash and the rinse mine in cold water often during the process. I have also used one of thefreezure cubes that I use in lunchboxes. I just keep it handy with a towel and rub my hands over it when they start getting warm. hth

gscout73 Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 4:24pm
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnotherCreation

I have also used one of thefreezure cubes that I use in lunchboxes. I just keep it handy with a towel and rub my hands over it when they start getting warm. hth




This is a great idea!!! thumbs_up.gif Thanx for the tip

Sandy

snickers34 Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 4:41pm
post #8 of 11

thanks everyone for the advice, hopefully I will get through this..LOL!!

raquel1 Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 5:03pm
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by gscout73

Quote:
Originally Posted by AnotherCreation

I have also used one of thefreezure cubes that I use in lunchboxes. I just keep it handy with a towel and rub my hands over it when they start getting warm. hth



This is a great idea!!! thumbs_up.gif Thanx for the tip

Sandy




Yes! I love this idea, I work fast and let the petals rest while I work on the next row, this gives it time to cool and firm up enough so when I come back to it I can shape them perfectly, love the stuff specially for roses. You can make the so realistic, this is a pic of my last ones:
http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1672137

raquel1 Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 5:04pm
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by gscout73

Quote:
Originally Posted by AnotherCreation

I have also used one of thefreezure cubes that I use in lunchboxes. I just keep it handy with a towel and rub my hands over it when they start getting warm. hth



This is a great idea!!! thumbs_up.gif Thanx for the tip

Sandy


Herekittykitty Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 5:29pm
post #11 of 11

I worked with it for the first time a few weeks ago and had the same problem.

I lightly dusted my surface with corn starch and the chocolate just a bit too. It helped absorb some of the oil and make the chocolate a bit firmer for moving. The oil seemed to absorb the corn starch and it didn't leave any white spots. If you let it sit on the counter for a few min. after working it it will firm up a bit as well.[/u]

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