How Do I Measure With A Digital Kitchen Scale???...

Decorating By Mikel79 Updated 25 Jun 2010 , 4:39pm by Mikel79

Mikel79 Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 1:27pm
post #1 of 11

Hi Cakers!

I know this is probably a stupid question, but humor me please. I currently use the standard 1 cup measuring cups when scooping out my shortening. It is a pain in the a@@ and not really accurate, I think.

I went to Wal-mart this morning to look at their scales and notice that they measure in pounds?? I use Sharon Z. BC recipe. It calls for 5 cups of shortening. How many pounds is this?

My math is terrible.

Thank you in advance...
Michael

10 replies
tiggy2 Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 1:39pm
post #2 of 11

Weigh 5 cups and see what it weighs icon_smile.gif

Doug Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 1:42pm
post #3 of 11

short cut...

how heavy is one can?

how many servings


divide total weight by # of servings to get weight of 1 serving.

now -- just how big is that serving?

calculate from that to = 1 cup

----

example

say can says your getting 1 lb of shortening.

and that it has 25 servings.

1lb / 25 = .04 lbs/serving

and 1 serving = 1 TBS

2 TBS = 1oz

16 TBS = 1 cup

so one cup of shortening = 16 * .04 = .64lbs = 10.24 oz = 290.3 grams

-------

BUT --- read closely that nutrition label.

10 to 1 it lists the weight of 1 serving in GRAMS.

so if 1 TBS = 1 serving and that = say 5 grams

then 1 cup would be 16 * 5= 90 grams / cup

so you need 450 (5 * 90) grams for the recipe.

-----

now, go sub in the real numbers from your can of shortening.

HotelPhyllis Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 1:57pm
post #4 of 11

Do a Google search for weights for baking ingredients. You should be able to find most ingredients.

TexasSugar Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 2:23pm
post #5 of 11

Weigh a cup or weight a couple of cups to see. When I weighed mine I believe I got 6 3/4ths oz per cup. I rounded it up to 7 since with my icing a little extra crisco doesn't hurt.

leah_s Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 2:25pm
post #6 of 11

a cup of shortening weighs 7 oz, usually. You really will need to take the time to measure, then weigh all your recipes to convert.

Only four things are the same in volume and weight, which is why math doesn't work well for this sort of problem. (whole butter, whole milk, whole eggs and water)

sweet_honesty Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 2:50pm
post #7 of 11

I usually use this site as a guide.

http://www.convert-me.com/en/convert/cooking#subs

Volume to weight conversions are a bit tricky.

tiggy2 Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 3:25pm
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

a cup of shortening weighs 7 oz, usually. You really will need to take the time to measure, then weigh all your recipes to convert.

Only four things are the same in volume and weight, which is why math doesn't work well for this sort of problem. (whole butter, whole milk, whole eggs and water)


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Kayakado Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 4:09pm
post #9 of 11

Usually the package gives a sample weight in the label with the food thingys like calories, sugars etc. It may say 1 serving = 2 Tbsp which = 28 grams multiply it out to get the cup measure.

I believe that all those digital scales also weigh in grams, there should be a button to switch between the two. I find grams to be easier to work with than ounces.

RLB's cake bible has several pages of food weights. I keep a spreadsheet of common foods and weights and have it taped on the inside of the cupboard door where I keep my scale.

metria Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 4:14pm
post #10 of 11

I used a 1.5 lb of high ratio shortening the other day and guesstimated it was about 3 cups.

Mikel79 Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 4:39pm
post #11 of 11

Thank you all!

I use Hi-Ratio shortening from TBK. The tubs that they come in do not have any food labels on them indicating serving sizes or any other similar information. The only label on it shows the name of the company and the ingredients.

I will do what a few have suggested. Take out 1 cup and see how much it weighs.

Thanks again!
Michael

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