Lol A New One :)

Decorating By Cakechick123 Updated 25 Jun 2010 , 10:34pm by costumeczar

Cakechick123 Posted 24 Jun 2010 , 10:31am
post #1 of 35

I decided to do some price checks in my area and mailed a couple of cake decorators with 2 pics of cakes. Explained I wanted a chocolate cake blah,blah and asked what the price would be.

One decorator mailed me back and told me that you
CANNOT DO A 3 TIER CAKE IN SPONGE CAKE AS IT WILL COLAPSE icon_confused.gificon_surprised.gificon_confused.gif
she only uses fruit cakes to stack as all other cakes are too soft. If the bride wants a sponge cake it must be on 3 different stands.
And this is a decorator that been in business about 10 years icon_surprised.gif

Guess she's never heard of internal supports icon_lol.gif

I was soooo tempted to mail her back and tell her to look at my website, they are ALL sponge cakes

34 replies
Caths_Cakes Posted 24 Jun 2010 , 10:55am
post #2 of 35

I must admit, i prefer to use fruit cakes for stacking because of the weight and denseness of them, but i still use internal supports even then, but i dont refuse sponge if thats what they want ! . . . perhaps she had a bad experience once and never tried again ?

artscallion Posted 24 Jun 2010 , 11:05am
post #3 of 35

If you use internal supports it doesn't matter what the cake is. The cakes don't support any weight if you've done it right. All the weight is supported by the dowels/straws. The cake just sits on the plate. Doesn't matter if it's fruit cake, sponge cake, angel food cake or a pile of bananas.

KHalstead Posted 24 Jun 2010 , 12:24pm
post #4 of 35

Collette peters I believe it was, when confronted with "can you stack this type of cake?" said something to the affect of "Honey, with plates and dowels you can stack jello if you want"

The type of cake makes NO difference! I've seen cheesecakes stacked (they're dense yes, but very fragile...most would crack apart just inserting dowels), and hey I think if people can manage to get cake mix cakes to stack then you CAN stack just about anything!! I can't even get one frosted without it falling apart lol

mamawrobin Posted 24 Jun 2010 , 3:54pm
post #5 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by KHalstead

Collette peters I believe it was, when confronted with "can you stack this type of cake?" said something to the affect of "Honey, with plates and dowels you can stack jello if you want


The type of cake makes NO difference! I've seen cheesecakes stacked (they're dense yes, but very fragile...most would crack apart just inserting dowels), and hey I think if people can manage to get cake mix cakes to stack then you CAN stack just about anything!! I can't even get one frosted without it falling apart lol





I love the line by C. Peters. thumbs_up.gif I don't understand why people think that cake supports cake icon_confused.gif Especially someone that has been in business for 10 years icon_eek.gif .

JCE62108 Posted 24 Jun 2010 , 4:02pm
post #6 of 35

Um.....I just dont get it. The cake I bake is so soft and moist and delicate. Its all I use. If you do it right (like mentioned above) its supported by dowels and plates. The cake doesnt support cake. So.....I dont get it.

bobwonderbuns Posted 24 Jun 2010 , 4:25pm
post #7 of 35

The only support issues I've ever seen are using angel food cake under a fondant cover -- certainly the fondant will be too heavy for that. But it sounds like this poor lost soul has completely missed the point of cake SUPPORT. icon_confused.gif

JCE62108 Posted 24 Jun 2010 , 7:43pm
post #8 of 35

In business for 10 years and only stacks fruit cakes? I just dont see how that's possible. I guess other countries like fruit cake more than americans do. lol. That nonsense wouldnt survive here for a week.

artscallion Posted 24 Jun 2010 , 8:00pm
post #9 of 35

If Toba Garret is to be believed, the standard cake in the UK is a fruitcake, covered in rolled out marzipan (almond paste) then covered completely in a type of royal icing which is smoothed to within an inch of its life. From the pictures in her books, they almost look like pastillage covered cakes...razor sharp edges...very elegant.

JCE62108 Posted 24 Jun 2010 , 8:10pm
post #10 of 35

Wow....I bet that is beautiful! It must be RI with a bit of glycerine added to keep it soft, right? I saw that recipe in a book once. I bet it is beautiful. Are these fruitcakes similar to the type americans get around Christmas time? Most people just through those out...or pick at it out of curiousity, but it seems people here just dont care for it very much.

artscallion Posted 24 Jun 2010 , 10:50pm
post #11 of 35

Here's what she says...
"In America royal icing, though creamy, is considered more of an ornamental icing. Outside the US, most decorated cakes are iced in royal icing. They are rich fruitcakes which first have a layer of marzipan...You can arrest the hard drying by stirring a little glycerine in...will allow it to dry on the outside yet remain soft in the middle..."

From her book, "The Well Decorated Cake" This book is a must-have in my opinion.

http://i48.tinypic.com/308bjpv.jpg[/img]

Look at how sharp those corners come out!

They even ice the cake board with royal icing.

http://i48.tinypic.com/zn3rxz.jpg[/IMG]

The elegant end result...

http://i50.tinypic.com/sb1wkp.jpg[/IMG]

She also has a recipe for fruitcake in the book that looks pretty much like what my idea of an American fruit is. Of course well made fruitcakes are really nothing like the crap that gets passed around the US at Xmas time.

JCE62108 Posted 24 Jun 2010 , 11:41pm
post #12 of 35

wow. that is beautiful. so perfect looking. If only I could get my buttercream to do that! RI really isnt that bad if its got some flavor added to it. I like it with almond when I use it on cookies. icon_smile.gif

costumeczar Posted 24 Jun 2010 , 11:41pm
post #13 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion


Of course well made fruitcakes are really nothing like the crap that gets passed around the US at Xmas time.




That's true. Rich fruitcakes have nothing to do with the yellow block of crap that people think of in the US.

JCE62108 Posted 24 Jun 2010 , 11:57pm
post #14 of 35

lol! Ive never seen yellow. Thats a new one to me. Usually brown and slimy-looking. But dry when you bite into it. Weird. I am curious now. I want to try some real fruitcake! Dont have a clue where Id get it here, and Id probably pay a fortune just to try some at a specialty bakery....I doubt there is even a bakery anywhere close to here that makes stuff like that. Lots of hispanic bakeries though. mmmmmm.......

costumeczar Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 12:01am
post #15 of 35

Jamaican fruitcake is soaked in rum, and British fruitcake is soaked in brandy...(or whatever booze is lying around hahaha!)

Here you go on the yellow one:
LL

catlharper Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 12:08am
post #16 of 35

Ok, nothing against those who love fruitcake but EWWWWW...that looks like nothing I'd want on my birthday or wedding day! I bake sponge and yes, stack it on a weekly basis so I have no idea what that woman is talking about. But I'm not a fruitcake fan, don't like the stuff that gets loaded into them, and really don't like booze in my cakes....shoot, I barely like it in a glass and I usually disguise it with all sorts of other stuff to make it taste good! LOL!

Just my 2 cents...Cat

JCE62108 Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 12:21am
post #17 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by catlharper

EWWWWW...





LOL Im with ya on that one. I like my chocolate cake....and carrot cake....and cheese cake....mmm.... icon_lol.gif

costumeczar Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 1:19am
post #18 of 35

Here's a photo of the rich fruitcake, so you can see the difference between it and the yellow monstrosity that is the US fruitcake. I personally LOVE rich fruitcake, but I know a lot of Brits who are so sick of it they have no desire to ever eat it again. I make them at Christmas and I have a little group of fruitcake lovers who I give them to. I guess if it's something you rarely have it's a treat, otherwise it's something you have to eat often and it's no good!
LL

3GCakes Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 1:39am
post #19 of 35

The round fruitcake pictured looks really good....but can it be made without the fruit? Cuz the cake part looks delicious, it's the fruit that weird "candied" fruit that I don't like.

JCE62108 Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 1:46am
post #20 of 35

That actually looks pretty good. Better than the yellow brick, that's for sure. Green cherries...uuugggghhhhkkkkk. Frightening.

So when you cover it with the marzipan and royal does it make it taste better? Or is that basically for looks? Ive never had marzipan before.....although I have some sitting in my pantry in a can. lol. Maybe I should try it one day.

Im so sorry. This post is getting horribly off topic. Feel free to yell at me at any time.

costumeczar Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 1:57am
post #21 of 35

What was the starting topic agian?

When I make it I don't even bother with the marzipan, I just eat it as is. You bake it and then soak it over a few weeks (at least) with brandy. I have a friend whose mother starts her holiday fruitcakes the year before so that she can feed it over the course of the year and let it mellow out. It's sooooooo good. All you need is a little sliver of it and a cup of tea or coffee. Yum!

JCE62108 Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 2:10am
post #22 of 35

OMG it lasts that long? I guess the alcohol keeps it from going bad? Geeze sounds like you could get wasted off that cake. Seriously the way you talk about it makes me want to try it. Too bad, no booze for me for another 6 months! (bun in the oven, lol)

cakeroach Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 2:12am
post #23 of 35
Quote:
Quote:

"and hey I think if people can manage to get cake mix cakes to stack then you CAN stack just about anything!! I can't even get one frosted without it falling apart lol "






Why do your boxed cakes fall apart when icing them? That sounds really odd. I ice a lot of box cakes and they ice just like scratch cakes, perfectly smooth. Just wondering how (your method) you ice a cake if you can't get a box mix cake to ice??

cutthecake Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 2:12am
post #24 of 35

I love American Christmastime fruitcake (no rum or brandy, though)! I'm the one that gets the fruitcakes that nobody else will eat. I make a honking big heavy one every Christmas, then I eat it every day for breakfast and lunch until it's gone. All by myself.
I love anchovies, too. I have a theory that people who like fruitcake also like anchovies.

cgm_cakes Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 4:38am
post #25 of 35

I've always wanted to make a good fruitcake but never found a decent recipe. Always wanted to try plum pudding too . . .

Cakechick123 Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 6:10am
post #26 of 35

well I see that overnight my post went from a silly decorator to the differences between fruit cakes icon_lol.gif

The fruit cake you get in South Africa are the same as the UK ones, rich, dark, loads of fruit and brandy, verrrrry yummy (to me). But the trend is changing here, very few brides actually wants fruit cake nowadays, well my customers in any case icon_smile.gif They all want soft sponge cakes in different flavours as their wedding cake.

The whole thing was just very funny to me when she lectured me about not being able to stack sponges, while I've done hundreds (not that she knew) , its like preaching to the choir icon_smile.gificon_smile.gif
There are several decorators I know that wont do sponge cakes as it is very last minute, a fruit cake can be baked and decorated over several weeks, so no last minute rush and late nights, but then they say that, they dont give brides a line about not being able to stack them.

miss_sweetstory Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 6:39am
post #27 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3GCakes

The round fruitcake pictured looks really good....but can it be made without the fruit? Cuz the cake part looks delicious, it's the fruit that weird "candied" fruit that I don't like.




The candied fruit here is so much better than the stuff sold in the states around the holidays. It makes a huge difference. I soak the fruit overnight in brandy so it's nice and plump when I bake. I moved here hating fruitcake (the "yellow" one), but I love a good rich fruit cake.

In response to the OP... do you think this might be a case of "old dog, no new tricks?" I see a lot of decorators here that stick very closely to classic styles and techniques and refuse to try anything new.

scorpio711 Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 7:15am
post #28 of 35

I use a Recipe given to me by a farmers wife in South Africa when I lived there. The fruit is boiled with the sugar and orange juice, (supposed to be apricot juice but can't get here in england) every one raves over it. It cuts beautifully for weddings into 1" pieces. I also find that the trend is for sponge cake now, but we Brits must have our Fruit Christmas cake. My pal is still eating hers from last Christmas, and refuses to give anyone a look in.
I buy the local supermarket (Asda Walmart) mixed fruit bag, it has very little candied stuff in.
I also don't like the look of those yellow cakes, with green cherries YUK.
Anyway anyone wants to try the recipe, contact me. You wont be disappointed. Greetings from here to there

noahsmummy Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 8:06am
post #29 of 35

egh. i hate fruitcake. its supposed to be "very popular" as a wedding cake here in aust too.. but ive never been to or heard of a wedding that has used it.

my mum loves and adores the stuff. my opa is a pastry chef, so he makes one for her, then she keeps it to have the year after, and eats the one she got the year before... ive never been one for dried fruit though, and im not big on alcohol either.. so that may be my problem..lol

LeonardoLi Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 11:25am
post #30 of 35

The Australian rich fruitcake is delicious, but I still can`t understand why we are eating that long. For me the cake older than 2 weeks is really OLD, and I will never eat it, no meter what kind of cake is. Fresh cake is healthier.

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