What Size Will My Number Be Using This Guide?

Decorating By Kaybaby Updated 23 Jun 2010 , 8:04pm by Kaybaby

Kaybaby Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 3:45pm
post #1 of 8

Thank you in advance for your help. I don't know why I can't figure this out for myself, but I can't. Brain fart? Old age? Menopause? Lack of sleep? 3 teenagers? To much caffeine? Who knows. Anyhow, if I use this guide to make my "5" and '0" cakes, how big will they be?

Thanks again,

Vonda

Image

7 replies
leily Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 3:49pm
post #2 of 8

I'm assuming you'll be using the 6" round, square or loaf pan that is shown in the diagram. So then your cakes will be about 6"wide by 12" long. (approximately)

HTH

Kaybaby Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 3:51pm
post #3 of 8

Thank you, it does help. I kept invisioning this mini cake. If the cake is stacked, how many people do you think it would serve?

Thanks so much,

Vonda

lilyankee5688 Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 4:09pm
post #4 of 8

I made the 3 using this guide, the Dora cake in my pics.. I used a bundt pan, which I would use for the 5 and 0 parts. I got about 20 servings out of my 3, but it was my family so it was a little bigger than the average party slice. you can use different size pans to reach the amount of servings you need. How many serving do you need?

KHalstead Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 4:27pm
post #5 of 8

really depends on how many servings you consider a 6" round to be.

The 5 is made up of -1-1/2 loafs (which is the third of the 6" square, so that's half of a 6' square)

- about 2/3 of the 6" round w/ the center removed. personally I would consider a 6" square 18 servings, so you're using 9 of those and the 6" round is 14 servings so you're using about 8 of those...so 17 servings for the number 5


You know you could always make these using larger rounds/squares. Since it's all broken up this way (brilliant by the way) you could go with an 8" round/square or 10" depending on how big you want your overall numbers to be and feed.


Also, are you doing it 4" tall or 2" tall?? That will make a huge difference in servings!

Kaybaby Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 7:35pm
post #6 of 8

Lily,

Adorable Dora cake!

KHalstead,

I need the cake to feed 40. I was leaning towards using an 8" round since I already own one. I was hoping I can do the rest with a 9x13 (I own one of those also). I honestly don't know how tall it should be. I seldom make cakes, I'm really somewhat clueless. I had planned on stacking the numbers with a filling. I like the height of the 50th example below.

What is a good height to use? The cake will be in the center of an 8' table surrounded my mini desserts.

Thank you again,

Vonda

Image

KHalstead Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 7:52pm
post #7 of 8

LOVE those cakes!! Probably the nicest number cakes I've ever seen.

I would suggest going with a full 4" height on the cakes if they're going to be on such a large table AND surrounded by other things. Looks to me like that example photo is 4" tall as well.



The best thing to do is to get some paper out and trace your 8" round pan and trace the 9"x13" and then cut the pieces of paper to form the numbers. Once you have the number made, start sectioning off 1"x2" sections for your servings. That should give you a good idea of the servings you're looking at!

Kaybaby Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 8:04pm
post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by KHalstead

LOVE those cakes!! Probably the nicest number cakes I've ever seen.

I would suggest going with a full 4" height on the cakes if they're going to be on such a large table AND surrounded by other things. Looks to me like that example photo is 4" tall as well.



The best thing to do is to get some paper out and trace your 8" round pan and trace the 9"x13" and then cut the pieces of paper to form the numbers. Once you have the number made, start sectioning off 1"x2" sections for your servings. That should give you a good idea of the servings you're looking at!





Thank you for the excellent suggestion. I'm assuming when I bake, I should make two 2" cakes to stack?

Vonda

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