Crumb Coating?

Decorating By Tre1 Updated 24 Jun 2010 , 3:53pm by Mickeebabe

Tre1 Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 2:56am
post #1 of 12

This will be my first time trying to make a buttercream cake and Im not sure what crumb coating is. Can someone help me out and also has anyone use wiltons buttercream or is it best to make your own?

11 replies
schnumvf Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 3:01am
post #2 of 12

A crumb coat is a thin layer of icing put on to seal your cake - to prevent crumbs from being in your "final coat" Wait for your crumb coat to set and ice again. Your crumb coat does not need to be thick... just a thin layer will do.
As for the Wilton icing, I never used it. Sorry, no help there.

mamawrobin Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 4:01am
post #3 of 12

It's best to make your own. The Wilton icing is not easy to smooth and it doesn't taste all that good IMO. I suggest that you try Indydebi's buttercream. It taste great, easy to make, crust very well and it smooths very well.

I always crumbcoat. I never have to worry about having crumbs in my icing.

catlharper Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 4:27am
post #4 of 12

Remember after crumbcoating to let your cake sit and settle for at least 2 hours if not more...overnight would be great. This is so that the cake will settle down and any filling that is going to sploosh out will do so...it will help prevent the "buldge" that many cakes have as well as prevent "blow outs" where the cake expells a gas bubble. This is especially important when working with fondant. HTH. Cat

metria Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 4:49am
post #5 of 12

keep in mind that the crumb coat doesn't have to be pretty. you can use thin to medium consistency buttercream to wipe a thin layer all around your cake. this will prevent any rogue crumbs from getting in to your final layer of buttercream for better presentation. an extreme example would be icing a red velvet cake in white buttercream. without the crumb coat, it's very easy to get a speck of red that will ruin a pure white look.

here's a picture of my last crumb coat.
LL

aprilmears Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 12:55pm
post #6 of 12

I'm looking for a cake with a navy SEABEES LOGO ON IT A BIRTHDAY CAKE

catlharper Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 6:44pm
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by aprilmears

I'm looking for a cake with a navy SEABEES LOGO ON IT A BIRTHDAY CAKE




April, not sure what that has to do with this post but if you google SEABEES LOGO CAKE IMAGE you are bound to find lots of photos..that is, if you haven't found them by doing a search right here on CC.

Cat

Mickeebabe Posted 24 Jun 2010 , 2:42am
post #8 of 12

Hi

I crumb coated a cake and let it sit and then when I put the final buttercream on, I got some crumbs. What did I do wrong? It was white buttercream over a chocolate cake.

Thanks for any help and advice. It seems to happen to me every time. icon_cry.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by metria

keep in mind that the crumb coat doesn't have to be pretty. you can use thin to medium consistency buttercream to wipe a thin layer all around your cake. this will prevent any rogue crumbs from getting in to your final layer of buttercream for better presentation. an extreme example would be icing a red velvet cake in white buttercream. without the crumb coat, it's very easy to get a speck of red that will ruin a pure white look.

here's a picture of my last crumb coat.


Darlene Posted 24 Jun 2010 , 2:48am
post #9 of 12

The easiest way to avoid crumbs in your final coat is not to touch the cake with your spatula.

metria Posted 24 Jun 2010 , 3:53am
post #10 of 12

couple more tips for avoiding crumbs.

after your crumb coat, clean your work area, especially the board under your cake. wipe away any excess crumbs or icing near your cake and tools.

make sure the icing you use for your final coat does not have crumbs. inspect your spatula or any tools before digging in to get more icing. wipe it completely if you get any crumbs on it.

pipe on the icing for your final coat on to the cake. i like to use a large tube tip (2A i think) and pipe lines of icing all around my cake so i can no longer see the crumb coat. i find this faster, more even, and practically crumb-free. there's another thread with a photo tutorial that i'll link in a sec.

Mickeebabe Posted 24 Jun 2010 , 3:53pm
post #12 of 12

Thanks. I think my icing needs to be a little thicker so I think I'll add it next time with one of my tips.

I have the video "Perfecting the Art of Buttercream" that I've just briefly skimmed through but I guess I need to watch the whole thing. I think that might help me alot.



Quote:
Originally Posted by metria

couple more tips for avoiding crumbs.

after your crumb coat, clean your work area, especially the board under your cake. wipe away any excess crumbs or icing near your cake and tools.

make sure the icing you use for your final coat does not have crumbs. inspect your spatula or any tools before digging in to get more icing. wipe it completely if you get any crumbs on it.

pipe on the icing for your final coat on to the cake. i like to use a large tube tip (2A i think) and pipe lines of icing all around my cake so i can no longer see the crumb coat. i find this faster, more even, and practically crumb-free. there's another thread with a photo tutorial that i'll link in a sec.


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