Cake Supports

Decorating By KayMc Updated 25 Jun 2010 , 1:21am by Rog2e

KayMc Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 2:33am
post #1 of 17

Ok, I'll be trying my first stacked cake next week (two 8" layers and two 6" layers). I have the bubble straws and have been reading how to do that. My question is the cake boards/support. Can I just use plain Wilton round cake boards on top of the bc frosting, or do I need to cover the boards with something? Or, do I need to use plastic separators instead of teh cardboard boards? Thanks!

16 replies
auntiecake Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 2:44am
post #2 of 17

I wouldn't use cardboard circles unless they are waxed. They will soak up moisture and may not support the cake. I have used acrylic plates, plastic separters (don't forget they have legs under them. A covered board or foam board would also work. Just make sure the plate and dowels will hold the weight of the cake.

bmoser24 Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 2:55am
post #3 of 17

I have used the boards, plain, uncovered wilton cake boards, esp. with the size your making. I havn't had a problem with them getting moisure i have had prob with dowels displacing under them so.... Now if the tier is larger and heavier I would use SPS system to have peace of mind. Great investment under $20 for me.

Rog2e Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 3:07am
post #4 of 17

Masonite cake boards are your best bet. You can get them at all the major cake decorating web sites or click the link in my signature.

We put cakes right on the masonite (after washing it off of course) as do many other cake decorators.

If you want more information on Masonite or "Tempered hardboard" in general, here is another link to a good file:

http://www.panel.com/uploads/whatisitcda0.pdf

metria Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 3:40am
post #5 of 17

you can definitely use the wilton boards, but i would suggest covering them in something to keep them from soaking up moisture. i like to use press 'n seal because it sticks easily and all i have to do is trim. make sure you trim your board to either exactly or a little smaller than your top tier. you can use your cake pan to trace a smaller circle on the board, then cut it out.

catlharper Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 4:37am
post #6 of 17

For just a 2 tier I use cardboard rounds under the cake and then set it on a cake drum covered with foil or fondant. However if the cake is more tiers than that I not only use the cardboard rounds under each tier but also SPS or a similar plastic seperator plate system for sturdiness. I have never had an issue with the cardboard soaking up too much moisture. HTH. Cat

CWR41 Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 4:57am
post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by KayMc

Can I just use plain Wilton round cake boards on top of the bc frosting




Yes, but you might also consider using a circle of waxed paper on top of the bc frosting before placing your cake circle on. Your cardboard won't get too soggy, but this prevents the icing from sticking to the circle when it's removed during the serving process.

Jeep_girl816 Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 5:48am
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWR41

Quote:
Originally Posted by KayMc

Can I just use plain Wilton round cake boards on top of the bc frosting



Yes, but you might also consider using a circle of waxed paper on top of the bc frosting before placing your cake circle on. Your cardboard won't get too soggy, but this prevents the icing from sticking to the circle when it's removed during the serving process.


This is what I was thinking too. I use just eh plain cardboard circles for two tier cakes all the time but mine don't get to sit around for very long either, if you're concerned then wax paper or press and seal is the way to go.

KayMc Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 2:05pm
post #9 of 17

Great advice! Thank you! I'm not sure what the press and seal is, though it sounds like contact paper? Is that right? But, several of you suggested wax paper, which is what I want to use for this. I already have it, so no need to buy anything else.

I do want to get the SPS, but then I have to worry about getting everything back. I'm a newbie hobby cake decorator, so I give my cakes away in order to get them out of MY house.

leah_s Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 2:21pm
post #10 of 17

First, SPS is a disposable system, so you don't have to get it back - assuming you charged the customer for it.

Second, a plain, unwaxed cardboard is FINE. It is NOT going to "soak up moisture" and cause the cake to collapse. There is no need to cover cardboards. In fact, the only time I've had a wee bit of trouble with a cardboard is with the waxed variety since they are soooo slippery.

Masonite is fine, but this is a 6/8 two tier cake. Cardboard will be fine for this one.

Of course, I use SPS with every cake, every time.

KayMc Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 2:31pm
post #11 of 17

Thanks, Leah. I was wondering about the cake slipping on a waxed surface. I have tons of the Wilton cardboard cake rounds that I got on sale, so I prefer to use this. Thanks again!

metria Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 3:49pm
post #12 of 17

GLAD Press'n Seal

http://www.glad.com/plasticwrap/pressnseal.php

It's a different kind of plastic food wrap that's sticky on one side...kinda nifty.

auntiecake Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 4:22pm
post #13 of 17

i HAVE SEEN PLAIN CARDBOARDS W/O COVERING THEM AND THEY GET SOGGY! i HAVE ALSO HEARD PEOPLE COMMENT ABOUT THEM ON A CAKE THEY PURCHASED FROM SOMEONE. i HAVE USED WAXED BOARDS AND NEVER HAD A PROBLEM WITH THEM SLIPPING. JUST WHAT i HAVE HEARD AND SEEN THRU THE LAST 40 YEARS +. YOU OF COURSE WELCOME TO DO WHATEVER YOU WANT, BUT JUST WANTED TO LET YOU KNOW. HAPPY CAKING!

CWR41 Posted 23 Jun 2010 , 11:56pm
post #14 of 17

The wax paper prevents it from getting too soggy, otherwise they might not look so good or even look a little flimsy, but not so much that it compromises the entire support structure. (I've never seen dowels, straws, or support pillars poke all the way through a cardboard circle with the exception of a sharpened dowel that's been hammered through it on purpose.)

If you don't want to spend a little extra money for the grease-proof circles, you could always use two non-coated circles instead. When using a separator plate (like SPS) in between your cake tiers, you'd normally have each tier on its own cardboard for handling purposes as well as keeping your plates from getting scored. So, if you aren't using a separator plate, you'd use one circle (much in the same way as the plate) within the area that has supports below, and the other circle that is on the bottom of your next tier which will be placed on top of the first circle you placed (attach with just a smear of buttercream). The grease, oil, and moisture isn't going to get through the waxed paper and two cardboard rounds. Just another option to consider if you're worried about wet cardboard.

auntiecake Posted 24 Jun 2010 , 2:27am
post #15 of 17

I agree w/2 circles of cardboard, but not one. They don't get so soggy that the supports go thru but they do get wet enough that they are not pleasing when you cut into the cake and they could compromise the support. 2 is fine or wax paper, or parchment paper to protect them is fine. Jimmies or something on top of the frosting also is good for extra protection. That is just my preference from comments I have heard. I prefer using acrylic or plastic separator plates. Masonite would be great! I didn't realize it was food safe so good to know it is an option. It would be less expensive than acrylic plates. Thanks for the info.

sweettreat101 Posted 24 Jun 2010 , 8:26am
post #16 of 17

I just made two wedding cakes for family members in the last two weeks. Cardboard circles are fine especially the sizes you are using.

Rog2e Posted 25 Jun 2010 , 1:21am
post #17 of 17

Yeah masonite is the way to go if you think it is worth the price or just pass the price onto your clients. Don't have to worry about soggy boards, or boards with poor support. But then again I'm biased. icon_biggrin.gif

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