Peony, Wired Petals Or No

Decorating By momma28 Updated 21 Jun 2010 , 1:46am by Marianna46

momma28 Posted 20 Jun 2010 , 11:57pm
post #1 of 9

I am playing around making some flowers and I have not made a peony so I thought I would try.

Want to do a closed peony and an open peony. There are not that many tutorials I can find. Some put their petals on wires and add the next day when dry...Buddy Valastro just layers the petals until it is as full as he wants (at least thats the tutorial I found)

If you make peony's can you tell me if you wire your petals or just let them dry and put them on without wire.

If you use wire....how the heck do you get the wire in the petal. I tried, if the petal was thick enough for the wire it was too thick to flutter nicely.

Any help would be great, thank you so much icon_smile.gif

8 replies
Jeep_girl816 Posted 21 Jun 2010 , 12:05am
post #2 of 9

This magazine has an awesome peony tutorial, both wired and not. It's somewhere in my cake stuff, I'll see if I can track it down & pm it to you.

momma28 Posted 21 Jun 2010 , 12:14am
post #3 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeep_girl816

This magazine has an awesome peony tutorial, both wired and not. It's somewhere in my cake stuff, I'll see if I can track it down & pm it to you.




wow that would be awesome icon_smile.gif thank you!

Malakin Posted 21 Jun 2010 , 12:46am
post #4 of 9

If you find the article and don't mind Jeep_girl816 please pm me a copy!

artscallion Posted 21 Jun 2010 , 1:07am
post #5 of 9

It helps if you have a cel board. I won't do wired petals or leaves without it. Here's a magnolia tutorial that is a good example of how a cel board works. It basically adds a thick ridge to your thin petal so that the wire can be inserted into it.

http://tinyurl.com/2dlcu6x

I find wired petals awkward to place and adjust though and prefer other alternatives.

momma28 Posted 21 Jun 2010 , 1:11am
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion

It helps if you have a cel board. I won't do wired petals or leaves without it. Here's a magnolia tutorial that is a good example of how a cel board works. It basically adds a thick ridge to your thin petal so that the wire can be inserted into it.

http://tinyurl.com/2dlcu6x

I find wired petals awkward to place and adjust though and prefer other alternatives.




Honestly I just dont want to spend 30 dollars on a board just to get a thick ridge. I would love an alternate. I dont use wires in my flowers usually.

Kaylani Posted 21 Jun 2010 , 1:32am
post #7 of 9

I have to agree with the cel board. It was tough to spend the $ on it, but now it is essential. Totally made the difference!

Here is a picture of a peony I did with the celboard. Once it gets past 4 or 5 rows using wired petals is the way it keeps the perfect shape and opens like the really peony.

They are time consuming to make, but oh so pretty! The amount of work to make the wired petals is worth it. Nicholas Lodge has a great dvd on the technique. HTH! icon_biggrin.gif
LL

Jeep_girl816 Posted 21 Jun 2010 , 1:45am
post #8 of 9

I have the article, and scanned it. It's not the best, my scanner leaves much to be desired. Anyone that wants it needs to pm me their email address because the "pm's" only let me send one attachment and the article is in three.

Marianna46 Posted 21 Jun 2010 , 1:46am
post #9 of 9

I saw a tutorial somewhere recently (I wish I could remember where!) that suggests that you do the following if you don't have a cel board, but need a middle ridge to thread a wire through: roll out the fondant or gumpaste with a very small roller (like the wooden stick that comes in the Wilton gumpaste flower kit) and roll it from the middle out, leaving the middle part thicker. Not being the proud owner of a cel board, I tried it, and it works pretty well, although it is a good deal more time consuming than rolling stuff out on a cel board would be. I'll certainly be getting one as soon as I clear my current debts, but meanwhile...

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