How To Use Wilton Gumpaste Tools

Decorating By bea30 Updated 18 Jun 2010 , 8:12pm by mpetty

bea30 Posted 17 Jun 2010 , 5:50pm
post #1 of 9

I feel stupid asking this. I ordered a big set of Wilton gumpaste tools...and I can't find anything about how to use them. Is there a tutorial out there that says how to use each tool? Some of them I know but I have a few that I really don't know what they are for. I lost the instructions. I am asking about the tools that have something on each end like the ball tool. I know how to use that one. But is there something explaining all of them out there? I can't find anything.

8 replies
chellescountrycakes Posted 17 Jun 2010 , 11:42pm
post #2 of 9

when I bought mine, I hadnt even SEEN a tutorial (still havent really, I cant watch youtube on dial up.. LOL ) I just kinda fiqured out what most of them did for me. like the pointy one, I make my wood grain with it.

Depending on what I am doing, I just grab one up and play with it icon_smile.gif if you find a description though, I'd love to know icon_smile.gif

KayMc Posted 18 Jun 2010 , 2:24am
post #3 of 9

Do you have the book that came with the gumpaste tools? that should give you an explanation.

bea30 Posted 18 Jun 2010 , 7:39am
post #4 of 9

I lost the paper. I wish I could find a copy. There is literally nothing out there online that I can find.

noahsmummy Posted 18 Jun 2010 , 9:44am
post #5 of 9

i have no idea what to do witrh mine either.. or what the proper names for each one is... they all have there own special names given to them by me though, "the pointy one" as someone else but yeah, i mainly just experiment with them.

mpetty Posted 18 Jun 2010 , 9:46am
post #6 of 9

If you go on YouTube and enter CakesBenicia in the search box, you'll find a number of tutorials using Wilton cutters. She's a Wilton instructor and shows you a variety of how-to's, including hydrangeas, orchids, dogwood, etc.

Elcee Posted 18 Jun 2010 , 1:51pm
post #7 of 9

I love my set and use it all the time. In addititon to the traditional uses, I find that the leaf veiner (it's kind of a turquoise color) works great to clean up edges of fondant/gumpaste cutouts and to slightly shift cutouts applied to a cake. The orange blade side is also good for cleaning up edges on larger cutouts and I use it after covering my cakes in fondant to tuck the edges of trimmed fondant under the cake. It's not sharp enough to use for cutting, though, it will stretch your fondant. The scalloped side of that one is great for the underside of a fondant covered cake board to smooth and adhere the fondant to the board. I haven't been able to get little lime green wheel cutter to work properly.

cheatize Posted 18 Jun 2010 , 1:57pm
post #8 of 9

Let's see if naming them is any help.
Ball tool- I use this for ruffling edges
Dog bone tool- I never use this one so I'm not sure of it's purpose.
Veiner- that's the pointy one, used to make vein patterns on leaves. I've used it on small petals, too.

mpetty Posted 18 Jun 2010 , 8:12pm
post #9 of 9

I found the sheet for my set, so here's what it says (quotation marks indicate the instructions as written on the sheet):

Blue and white sticks with thin and thick points: use for frilling and ruffling petals and leaves; also use as small rolling pins.

veining tool to make thin or wide veins on leaves and flowers.

Orange: shell tool and knife; use shell to make impressions on borders and trim. It says the knife trims petals and leaves, but I agree with Elcee that it's too dull for that.

Blue: dogbone tool, used to cup flower centers and is used to shape and soften flower petals. I use for small filler flowers.

Olive green: serrated quilling wheel and cutting tool. Makes quilt stitches on fondant. I've seen someone on YouTube cut around a pattern on top of gumpaste with the cutting end and it actually did cut.

Red: umbrella tool, used to add detail to flower throats and tops of buds. You can also create flower petals by "spearing the desired side of tool (5-sided or 6-sided end) into top of fondant bud on florist wire. Use knife tool (orange) to cut desired amount of petals."

(FYI this is called a pulled flower because after you make the cuts for the petals, you turn the flower over and form the petals by gently pulling the gumpaste out.)

Mint green: serrated and cone tool; serrated end adds veining and dot details. "Cone end hollows out flowers and tops of buds. After petals have been formed on flowers, spear center of flower with serrated side of tool to create natural-looking centers. Use cone side to create larger well in center of flower."

Violet: Ball tool, "used to soften and smoother outer edge of petal without tearing."

Hope this helps!

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