How Do I Get Rid Of These Lines?

Decorating By Vanessa7 Updated 18 Jun 2010 , 7:22pm by audrey0522

Vanessa7 Posted 16 Jun 2010 , 7:29pm
post #1 of 15

I seem to be having a continual problem with the location where the icing between my cake layers is showing through my fondant. I thought I was putting too much icing but had same problem when I put less. I tried putting more icing with my crumb coat and that didn't help. I tried refrigerating the cake before putting the fondant on, no luck. I rolled the fondant using the thickest guide but same result. What am I doing wrong? What are you doing to hide that seam through your fondant?

Just a little frustrated (can you tell?) and want my cakes to look as professional as possible. Thanks for your help.

14 replies
SecretAgentCakeBaker Posted 16 Jun 2010 , 8:06pm
post #2 of 15

Are the sides of your cake pan perfectly straight, or do they slope ever so slightly? If they slope, this could be the problem. When they get stacked, the top is not the same size as the bottom and could cause a line. You would either have to trim it off, or just get a pan with straight sides.

I decided to just buy new pans and be done with fighting with them. I kept my sloped sided pans for regular home cooking, such as making cinnamon rolls.

artscallion Posted 16 Jun 2010 , 8:20pm
post #3 of 15

Yes, what Barbarann said. Plus, are you piping a dam to hold your filling in? Also, after the filled layers are put together, I also pipe around the seams with the same extra thick buttercream I'd used for the dam.

And...you have to let your filled, unfrosted cake settle for 4-12 hours so these things can work themselves out BEFORE they're covered in frosting and fondant.

tiggy2 Posted 16 Jun 2010 , 8:30pm
post #4 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion

Yes, what Barbarann said. Plus, are you piping a dam to hold your filling in? Also, after the filled layers are put together, I also pipe around the seams with the same extra thick buttercream I'd used for the dam.

And...you have to let your filled, unfrosted cake settle for 4-12 hours so these things can work themselves out BEFORE they're covered in frosting and fondant.



DITTO!!!

mayo2222 Posted 16 Jun 2010 , 8:37pm
post #5 of 15

YYep, make sure you let the filled cakes settle. To help with settling you can push down on the cakes and/or saran wrap the top and lay heavy book/tile on top

Vanessa7 Posted 16 Jun 2010 , 8:51pm
post #6 of 15

Ding ding ding ding!!!! That makes sense! I do need a little clarification though. I need to pipe an extra dose of icing around the seam and then let the cakes set 4 - 12 hours . . . is this before or after I put the crumb coat on? I thought that if I let the icing crust too much the fondant would not adhere as well. (Can you tell I'm still fairly new in the cake decorating business? lol) I never thought about putting something heavy on top as well. What would you suggest I put on top of the cake.

Thank you for your help! I really do appreciate it. icon_biggrin.gif

Vanessa7 Posted 16 Jun 2010 , 8:53pm
post #7 of 15

Sorry Mayo2222, I just reread your post and realized you told me what to place on top of my cake. Guess this 50+ year old brain is shining through. icon_rolleyes.gif

tiggy2 Posted 17 Jun 2010 , 2:52am
post #8 of 15

You can also use a ceramic tile

emrldsky Posted 18 Jun 2010 , 1:31pm
post #9 of 15

You want to add the extra around the seam before crumb coating, and you want to let the cake setting before crumb coating. Once it's settled (either for several hours or a couple of hours with a ceramic tile on top), you crumb coat or add your frosting (I don't crumb coat, I just add my icing without getting it messy). icon_smile.gif

Good luck!!

Vanessa7 Posted 18 Jun 2010 , 6:36pm
post #11 of 15

Isn't it weird how they don't tell you these tricks when taking cake decorating classes?? I love the tile suggestion but I'm thinking maybe the icing I'm using for the dam isn't stiff enough either. I typically use a white chocolate buttercream that is 1/2 butter : 1/2 crisco. I love the taste but know it's definately not stiff enough to make roses so maybe this is part of my problem too. Any suggestions? I really dislike the heavy crisco taste.

emrldsky Posted 18 Jun 2010 , 6:41pm
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vanessa7

Isn't it weird how they don't tell you these tricks when taking cake decorating classes?? I love the tile suggestion but I'm thinking maybe the icing I'm using for the dam isn't stiff enough either. I typically use a white chocolate buttercream that is 1/2 butter : 1/2 crisco. I love the taste but know it's definately not stiff enough to make roses so maybe this is part of my problem too. Any suggestions? I really dislike the heavy crisco taste.




I don't use a dam when I fill with butter cream and the tile method works wonders. icon_smile.gif If I use a filling like red raspberry, then I'll use a dam, but it's not that stiff.

leah_s Posted 18 Jun 2010 , 6:54pm
post #13 of 15

I make up a small batch of stiff, stiff (veg shortening based) bc just for dams. it's in a container labeled "Dam Icing."

awatterson Posted 18 Jun 2010 , 7:15pm
post #14 of 15

leah_s, do you use a thick dam even when your filling is just buttercream?

audrey0522 Posted 18 Jun 2010 , 7:22pm
post #15 of 15

From Leah
I make up a small batch of stiff, stiff (veg shortening based) bc just for dams. it's in a container labeled "Dam Icing."



yeah, I call my icing that a lot too!!

_________________

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%